Age?

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Miron Schmidt

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Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
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Hi!

I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.
Now, I understand that most of us have to be old enough to have experienced
the old magic when it was still fresh. At this age, it starts to be
considered rude to ask for details.
Nevertheless, I _have_ wondered.
From what I've heard, most of us are around my own age, give or take. So may
I make a start.
I'm 25: 26 in two weeks (hey, if anyone happens to be in Berlin at the time,
you're invited to my birthday party :)).

Any volunteers?


--
Miron Schmidt <mi...@comports.com> PGP key on request

WATCH TV... MARRY AND REPRODUCE... OBEY... PLAY INTERACTIVE FICTION...


Matthew Amster-Burton

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Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
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Miron Schmidt <s59...@tfh-berlin.de> wrote:

>I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.
>Now, I understand that most of us have to be old enough to have experienced
>the old magic when it was still fresh. At this age, it starts to be
>considered rude to ask for details.
>Nevertheless, I _have_ wondered.

As Neil D. put it, I'm far too young to remember Watergate. In fact,
I was born over a year after Nixon resigned.

Matthew
(Political junkie)


Andrew Plotkin

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Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
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Obfuscation, obfuscation... I'm 27.

In the spirit of prying, I'll point out that in the "About the Author"
section of Jigsaw, Graham admitted to having been born in 1968.

--Z

--

"And Aholibamah bare Jeush, and Jaalam, and Korah: these were the
borogoves..."

Allen Garvin

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Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
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In article <33B00B17.MD-...@tfh-berlin.de>,
Miron Schmidt <s59...@tfh-berlin.de> wrote:
>Hi!

>
>I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.
>Now, I understand that most of us have to be old enough to have experienced
>the old magic when it was still fresh. At this age, it starts to be
>considered rude to ask for details.
>Nevertheless, I _have_ wondered.
>From what I've heard, most of us are around my own age, give or take. So may
>I make a start.
>I'm 25: 26 in two weeks (hey, if anyone happens to be in Berlin at the time,
>you're invited to my birthday party :)).

Oh boy! Another pointless thread that will be posted to millions of machines
throughout the civilized world and will cost the net hundreds (if not
thousands) of dollars.

I'm 28, and I got my first adventure game (Zork I) when I was 13.

--
Allen Garvin
------------
eare...@faeryland.tamu-commerce.edu
http://faeryland.tamu-commerce.edu/~earendil

John Francis

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Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
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In article <erkyrathE...@netcom.com>,

Andrew Plotkin <erky...@netcom.com> wrote:
>Matthew Amster-Burton (mam...@u.washington.edu) wrote:
>> Miron Schmidt <s59...@tfh-berlin.de> wrote:
>
>> >I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.
>> >Now, I understand that most of us have to be old enough to have experienced
>> >the old magic when it was still fresh. At this age, it starts to be
>> >considered rude to ask for details.
>> >Nevertheless, I _have_ wondered.
>
>> As Neil D. put it, I'm far too young to remember Watergate. In fact,
>> I was born over a year after Nixon resigned.
>
>Obfuscation, obfuscation... I'm 27.
>
When I was 27, IF consisted of ADVENT. In FORTRAN.
The first release of ZORK was a year away.

(To save you time searching the history files, that makes me 48)
--
John Francis jfra...@sgi.com Silicon Graphics, Inc.
(415)933-8295 2011 N. Shoreline Blvd. MS 43U-991
(415)933-4692 (Fax) Mountain View, CA 94043-1389
Unsolicited electronic mail will be subject to a $100 handling fee.

J. Holder

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Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
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In a fit of lunacy, Miron Schmidt (s59...@tfh-berlin.de) escribed:
: From what I've heard, most of us are around my own age, give or take. So may

: I make a start.
: I'm 25: 26 in two weeks (hey, if anyone happens to be in Berlin at the time,
: you're invited to my birthday party :)).

I'm 26, 27 in August. Sorry I won't be in Berlin... :(

: WATCH TV... MARRY AND REPRODUCE... OBEY... PLAY INTERACTIVE FICTION...

> WATCH TV

You are watching an inane program called "Married with Children"

> MARRY AND REPRODUCE

After watching that show, you decide against it.

> PLAY INTERACTIVE FICTION

You whip out a copy of I-0, and have some fun!

--
John Holder (jho...@frii.com) /\ http://www.frii.com/~jholder/
UNIX Specialist, Paranet Inc. <--> Raytracing|Fractals|Interactive Fiction
http://www.paranet.com/ \/ Homebrewing|Strange Attractors

Mary K. Kuhner

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Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
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I'll be 34 next week. Played Scott Adams and Infocom games when I was
an undergraduate in college, on my squeaky new Atari 800 with cassette
tape player. It took me years to become willing to do save/restore
after the bad experiences I had with that thing.

But I think I've played more IF in the last year than I ever did back
then.

Mary Kuhner mkku...@genetics.washington.edu

Mark J Musante

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Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
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Andrew Plotkin (erky...@netcom.com) wrote:
> Matthew Amster-Burton (mam...@u.washington.edu) wrote:
> > As Neil D. put it, I'm far too young to remember Watergate. In fact,
> > I was born over a year after Nixon resigned.
>
> Obfuscation, obfuscation... I'm 27.

Zarf, I'm sure your obfuscatory talents will improve once you've
reached 30, like me.

Oops.

- Mark

wo...@one.net

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Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
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Hi Miron,

Miron Schmidt <s59...@tfh-berlin.de> wrote:

>I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.

> ...


>From what I've heard, most of us are around my own age, give or take. So may
>I make a start.
>I'm 25: 26 in two weeks (hey, if anyone happens to be in Berlin at the time,

I'm 37, first ran into IF with the granddaddy of them all--the Fortran
version of Advent running on a DEC PDP-11 when the game was still
distributed on paper tape, which was probably back in 1976 - 1977.

The perfect game to play on those nifty new CRT terminals...

Respectfully,

Wolf (starting to grey around the muzzle)


Matthew T. Russotto

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Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
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In article <33afff33...@news.u.washington.edu>,

Matthew Amster-Burton <mam...@u.washington.edu> wrote:
}Miron Schmidt <s59...@tfh-berlin.de> wrote:
}
}>I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.
}>Now, I understand that most of us have to be old enough to have experienced
}>the old magic when it was still fresh. At this age, it starts to be
}>considered rude to ask for details.
}>Nevertheless, I _have_ wondered.
}
}As Neil D. put it, I'm far too young to remember Watergate. In fact,
}I was born over a year after Nixon resigned.

Ack, a young'un!

I'm old enough to remember playing "Star Trek" on a state-of-the-art
printing terminal connected to an acoustic coupler. I think I saw
"Adventure" on that terminal too, but I didn't really get into it
until I got an Apple ][ with the Microsoft version.
--
Matthew T. Russotto russ...@pond.com
"Extremism in defense of liberty is no vice, and moderation in pursuit
of justice is no virtue."

ryb...@anok4u2.org

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Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
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16...please don't hate me....

peace___anarchyfreedompunkinteractivefictionslackantiinfinityyellowoi!2o3.
/ -\--- Rotund \/ ! "Live long & | ryb...@connix.com
(/ ) Pigeon \00_| fuck off!!" |Its always after MidNite
\o-o/ _||_ Riot Nrrrd | www.connix.com/~rybread

-------------------==== Posted via Deja News ====-----------------------
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Torbj|rn Andersson

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Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
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Miron Schmidt <s59...@tfh-berlin.de> wrote:

>I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.
>Now, I understand that most of us have to be old enough to have experienced
>the old magic when it was still fresh. At this age, it starts to be
>considered rude to ask for details.
>Nevertheless, I _have_ wondered.

Well, I'm 26, and I first got access to computers in the early
eighties, so in theory I should be old enough to have seen at least
some of the old magic while it was fresh.

However, since these were Swedish computers, the availability of
software was somewhat limited, and adventures were almost unheard of.


INFOCOM NOSTALGIA WARNING!!!


And even when I finally got access to a computer which could play
Infocom games, the computer stores here tended to take a rather dim
view on text games, basically telling me that I didn't really want to
play them, and what I really want to play was this neaty graphical
game.

While I had played some Infocom games (pirated, I have to admit), it
wasn't until much later that I finally managed to order some from the
US. I don't remember what year this was, but Beyond Zork had been
written, Triton were distributing the games, and Infocom had started
to look into graphical games, although none had been released yet.

I still remember that day. I was home sick when the games finally
arrived: Trinity (I'm still trying to make up my mind on whether it's
great or just plain weird) and Deadline (which remains one of my
favorite games). I was amazed at the packaging for Deadline. Come to
think of it, I still am.

After that, I ordered quite a number of Infocom games through Triton,
until they suddenly, tragically, became unavailable, and I kept
ordering them from England (and even a few from Swedish stores) until
1991. Most of the ones I ordered from England, alas, used the later,
not as robust, box design, and arrived in a rather sorry state.

And, of course, I ended up buying the Lost Treasure of Infocom
collections to fill most of the remaining holes in my collection,
although there are still games I wish I had in their original
packaging. Some day, perhaps ...

Ah, the memories ...

_
Torbjorn

John Wood

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Jun 24, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/24/97
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Miron Schmidt <s59...@tfh-berlin.de> asks

>I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.

Dunno, but if you want a data point, I'm 32 (33 next month).
John (who got married last saturday 8-)

Patrick Kellum

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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[I would quote, but as usual I never recived the orignal post, it'll show
up next month (not kidding)]

Well, I'm an old fart, being 26 I'm the oldest of all my friends which
really makes me feel real old sometimes.

My start in IF was a pirated copy of Zork III for the Apple IIe givin to
me and my classmates by my computer teacher (he also gave us each a copy
of Strip Poker ;-) Ahhh, I miss being 15.

I didn't really get totally hooked until I started a BBS and found out I
could use text adventures as on-line games. After playing them for hours
I became hooked.

Patrick
---

"Every weekday morning the school bell cast its glamour over the
surounding hills, calling the young to classes. They came running
down the slopes and leaping over the streams, out from caves and the
hollows of trees and suburban tract homes, impelled by powers greater
then their own to gain an education."
"The Iron Dragon's Daughter" by Michael Swanwick

Urpo Lankinen

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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On Tue, 24 Jun 1997 22:52:51 -0600, ryb...@anok4u2.org
<ryb...@anok4u2.org> wrote:

>16...please don't hate me....

I'm 18. Why should I hate you? B-)

I got my first touches to IF via Petteri Järvinen's book
"Mikrotietokoneet" (published 1986) which contained transcript (with
Finnish translation) from the beginning of Zork I. I *loved* the
game, though I was unable to get it. Later, I bought
Zork II for Commodore 64... for 20 FIM (USD $4 ?)... Sheer luck.

--
Urpo Lankinen || www...@iki.fi || http://www.iki.fi/wwwwolf/


Stephen Granade

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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On 24 Jun 1997, Miron Schmidt wrote:

> I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.

I'm 24. I don't know what the average age is, but I could guess:

73.

Stephen

--
Stephen Granade | "It takes character to withstand the
sgra...@phy.duke.edu | rigors of indolence."
Duke University, Physics Dept | -- from _The Madness of King George_


Laurel Halbany

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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Miron Schmidt <s59...@tfh-berlin.de> wrote:

>I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.

>Now, I understand that most of us have to be old enough to have experienced
>the old magic when it was still fresh. At this age, it starts to be
>considered rude to ask for details.
>Nevertheless, I _have_ wondered.

I started to play I-F when my dad took me to the technical school he
taught at; he'd leave me in the computer room to play games while he
was busy. I don't know if the Adventure on their mainframe was
FORTRAN, but I rather suspect so.

----------------------------------------------------------
Laurel Halbany
myt...@agora.rdrop.com
http://www.rdrop.com/users/mythago/

Mordacai

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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I would appear to be one of the young ones in this group, at 17. This is
an interesting situation in that, frankly, it's a good age for computer
gamers, so I've played a lot of the current graphic games as well as i-f,
and I've learned from both. My first connection with i-f was in fifth
grade when my teacher (Mrs. Martinez, who I still claim was the best
teacher I ever had) got a group of us together in the ancient computer lab
and gave us Zork. We went wild, and, from that day on I've loved i-f and
have wanted to write a piece of my own. I admit, being one of the
youngest here, I'm a little intimidated; I've sunk about 40 work hours
into my little game so far and am hoping it'll be able to stand on it's
own out there in the cold, harsh world ;)

Ian
mord...@ix.netcom.com
"I'm more of a man than you'll ever be and more of a woman than
you'll ever get." -Angel, RENT

GElli84119

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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I was exactly 0 years old when Infocom got started

Jim MacBrayne

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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>>I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.
>> ...
>>From what I've heard, most of us are around my own age, give or take. So may
>>I make a start.
>>I'm 25: 26 in two weeks (hey, if anyone happens to be in Berlin at the time,

Funnily enough, I've often wondered about this as well but didn't have
the brass neck to make the posting. I'm pretty much of an occasional
lurker here only.

Equally funnily enough, most of the ages I've seen tie in pretty well
exactly with what I'd imagined.

I'm 54, so that makes me the grandaddy of you all!

Jim

-----------------------------------------
Jim MacBrayne
jm...@medusa.u-net.com
http://www.medusa.u-net.com/jmacb.htm
CIS 100411,461
-----------------------------------------

J. Holder

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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In a fit of lunacy, Jim MacBrayne (jm...@medusa.u-net.com) escribed:
: I'm 54, so that makes me the grandaddy of you all!

So you're saying Uncle Bob and Uncle Volker aren't the oldest of the crowd
anymore, Grandpa Jim? ;)

J. Holder

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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In a fit of lunacy, ryb...@anok4u2.org escribed:
: 16...please don't hate me....

More likely, you'll find that we are happy that IF is still interesting, and
can appeal to you as a programmer!

J. Holder

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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In a fit of lunacy, Stephen Granade (sgra...@phy.duke.edu) escribed:
: On 24 Jun 1997, Miron Schmidt wrote:

: > I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.

: I'm 24. I don't know what the average age is, but I could guess:

: 73.

You're just saying that because we all act like old farts, constatntly
bitching about this and that, and "the good (bad?) old days"...

Hmmmph!

<ALERT=NOSTALGIA>
My first experience with IF was at a family day at my father's workplace,
Los Alamos National Labs, in 1978. I sat down in front of a high-tech
green screen (next to a few old teletypes) and played Crowther & Woods
"Adventure" on some old DEC platform. I was a ripe eight years old.
In 1980 I enrolled in a BASIC programming class at the High School
(it was a summer school course, and I got special dispensation to
enroll) where I learned my first programming chops on a PDP11/780.
Late that year I got my first PeeCee, an Atari 800 w/ 16Kb RAM and a
screaming tape drive. For almost $800.00. ->SIGH<- Ah, how fun
it was, Zorking about (after a RAM upgrade and a floppy drive).

Okay, I'm making myself sick. I hate to think about everyone else...
</ALERT>

RayDunakin

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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I'm 42, and I've been writing adventure games (Another Fine Mess, A Mess
O'Trouble, Twisted!) since I got my first computer about 5-6 years ago.

chris markwyn

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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I'm 20, 21 in November. The first IF i played were some old AGT games that a
friend gave me, on an original IBM PC. After that I played the Zork trilogy
and Hitchhiker's on the Apple IIe at school. I didn't really get back into IF
until I went to college, got an e-mail account, and stumbled across r.a.if and
the Unnkullia games.

--Chris M.

Graham Nelson

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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Miron Schmidt <s59...@tfh-berlin.de> asks

>I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.

29. Actually, I just got an award which is only available to
people under 30, with a feeling of being just in the nick of
time.

--
Graham Nelson | gra...@gnelson.demon.co.uk | Oxford, United Kingdom


John Francis

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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In article <8672101...@dejanews.com>, <ryb...@anok4u2.org> wrote:
>16...please don't hate me....
>
Why should we hate you just because you are 16?

In fact it might make some of us look on you more favourably.
Your excruciatingly bad entries in the 1996 interactive fiction
competition (which are the primary things we have to judge you by)
become a little more understandable when we remember what it was
like to be sixteen (I think I can remember that far back ...).

This is a test

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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J. Holder (jho...@deimos.frii.com) wrote:

: My first experience with IF was at a family day at my father's workplace,


: Los Alamos National Labs, in 1978. I sat down in front of a high-tech
: green screen (next to a few old teletypes) and played Crowther & Woods
: "Adventure" on some old DEC platform. I was a ripe eight years old.

I remember going to my father's workplace and having to play *Yahtzee*. I
bet your dad could beat up my dad, too. I'm 26.

Stephen Robert Norris

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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Miron Schmidt wanted to know how old we are:

26.5. My first encounter with adventure games was a Scott Adams thing, and I
immediately thought "I can do better". I wrote a much better parser in basic
for the C64, with all the rooms in data statements. You could do things like
"get all but the rock". Once I found the Infocom adventures I was hooked :)

I guess that first start was in about 1982...

Stephen

Julian Arnold

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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In article <33b0b98d...@news.one.net>, <URL:mailto:wo...@one.net> wrote:
>
> Miron Schmidt <s59...@tfh-berlin.de> wrote:
>
> >I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.
> > ...
> >From what I've heard, most of us are around my own age, give or take. So may
> >I make a start.
> >I'm 25: 26 in two weeks (hey, if anyone happens to be in Berlin at the time,

I gave my age a while ago, so you'll all know it if you were paying
attention.

Of course, I'm a bit older now (still no game :).

Jools
--
"For small erections may be finished by their first architects; grand
ones, true ones, ever leave the copestone to posterity. God keep me
from ever completing anything." -- Herman Melville, "Moby Dick"


StarrGirl

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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Torbj|rn Andersson wrote:
>
> Miron Schmidt <s59...@tfh-berlin.de> wrote:
>
> I still remember that day. I was home sick when the games finally
> arrived: Trinity (I'm still trying to make up my mind on whether it's
> great or just plain weird) and Deadline (which remains one of my
> favorite games). I was amazed at the packaging for Deadline. Come to
> think of it, I still am.
>

So what were those pills in the original deadline folder really? I got
the game I think I was 13 years old and I sooo wanted to eat them
because I knew they couldn't be harmful since if they were they wouldn't
have been able to package them in a game! If you go to Computer shows
and even thrift stores you can find the originals sometimes. The disks
of course are unusable unless you got a spare Apple lying around, but
buying them for the packaging has come to mind. The biggest
disapointment for me when the games were re-released was that they came
with that big book which didn't even come with all the information you
needed! (example, the radio station info for Ballyho)

Sorry I know this has nothing to do with CREATING the games, but I just
had to reminise for a moment.

Martin DeMello

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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On 24 Jun 1997 18:59:56 GMT, jfra...@dungeon.engr.sgi.com (John
Francis) wrote:

>In article <erkyrathE...@netcom.com>,
>Andrew Plotkin <erky...@netcom.com> wrote:


>>Matthew Amster-Burton (mam...@u.washington.edu) wrote:
>>> Miron Schmidt <s59...@tfh-berlin.de> wrote:
>>

>>> >I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.

>>> >Now, I understand that most of us have to be old enough to have experienced
>>> >the old magic when it was still fresh. At this age, it starts to be
>>> >considered rude to ask for details.
>>> >Nevertheless, I _have_ wondered.
>>

>>> As Neil D. put it, I'm far too young to remember Watergate. In fact,
>>> I was born over a year after Nixon resigned.
>>

>>Obfuscation, obfuscation... I'm 27.
>>

>When I was 27, IF consisted of ADVENT. In FORTRAN.
>The first release of ZORK was a year away.
>
>(To save you time searching the history files, that makes me 48)

I'm 21 (rapidly tending to 22). I started off with a BBC Micro some 11
years back, which had a lot of great adventures available (and a lot
of not-so-great ones :-) ). I remember finishing (and enjoying) Twin
Kingdom Valley, and getting totally stuck on Snowball (has anyone
played either?). And you're right about the sense of magic that seemed
to imbue all but the most cursorily-written games.

Martin

Carl Muckenhoupt

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Jun 25, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/25/97
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27, if you must know. And my first adventure, at the age of eight, was
Scott Adams' Adventureland. The original version, in TRS-80 BASIC, not
the later form with the game engine in assembly language and the
standardized data file format. (You actually had to wait several seconds
for your commands to be processed...)

--
Carl Muckenhoupt ca...@earthweb.com
EarthWeb http://www.earthweb.com/

David Dyte

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

Miron Schmidt wanted to know how old we are:

28. In 1982 I played Dungeon at school on a PDP-11 and was addicted
pretty much immediately. Mind you, I was also addicted to Super Star Trek.

At a new school the next year, a friend of mine (who shall remain
nameless but will read this post) acted as computer while I played
Scott Adams adventures he had memorised, during a stunningly dull
hiking camp.

Once I got my Vic 20, well I already knew how to solve Adventureland,
and things went from there...

- David Dyte

Florian Beck

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

Graham Nelson <gra...@gnelson.demon.co.uk> writes:
> Miron Schmidt <s59...@tfh-berlin.de> asks

> >I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.
>
> 29.

Yes I can resist...


Anyway, I'm 25. Below average, but not out of place. Tough it seems
I'm very new to the IF community: I have *finished* my first IF game
about a year ago. I have first *played around* with IF 2 years ago
when I installed Linux (which comes with dungeon). And I have vague
memories of encountering a IF game some ten years ago which featured
???urga-mauls???)

Question to IF authors: Is it normal to have started about ten games,
discarded them all and therefore having zero lines of code after one
year of writing?

--
Flo

Mark Hultz

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
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On June 25th,
Florian Beck <h729...@sun1.cip.fak14.uni-muenchen.de> wrote:

> Question to IF authors: Is it normal to have started about ten games,
> discarded them all and therefore having zero lines of code after one
> year of writing?
>

Is it normal to start them, or to discard them? Personally, I start quite
a few, finish some, but discard nothing. (Secretly, I'm holding them in
reserve for my Lost Episodes Archive!). My advice is to keep at it!

By the way, in further response to the Age question, I'm 34.

Mark Hultz
hu...@hometel.com


Gerry Kevin Wilson

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

22. But I swear, I'm really 84 at heart.
--
My new email address is: whiz...@pobox.com.
If that's too long for you, try g...@pobox.com.

Andrew Plotkin

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
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Florian Beck (h729...@sun1.cip.fak14.uni-muenchen.de) wrote:
> Question to IF authors: Is it normal to have started about ten games,
> discarded them all and therefore having zero lines of code after one
> year of writing?

I think it's much more common to have ten unfinished games lying around,
each with zero lines of code -- but I'm going to get back to them,
honest, I'm not discarding anything...

--Z

--

"And Aholibamah bare Jeush, and Jaalam, and Korah: these were the
borogoves..."

Gnimish

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

Well, I'm 19--a youngen' for IF--whose first IF game to play was Sorcerer
sometime around its release. I have since played a few, but didn't really
have access to a lot of them until buying the Lost Treasures of Infocom Vol
I. (I missed the second one. Dammit.)

Just last week I got a copy of the Masterpieces of Infocom CD. I was
enthralled. I began searching through directories for more info. You can
imagine my surprise when I learned that IFs not only had two newsgroups,
but new ones are still being written. It didn't take me two minutes of
searching the IF ftp site before I decided that I, too, must try this
thing. I am a Film/Video and Theater double major. I am a writer. I
can't think of anything more difficult or rewarding than breathing life
into a section of interactive text. To truly take people somewhere of
their own volation. Their mind's supply the magic.

I may be a youngen, but I bring with me many a computer game disillusioned
friend!

Matthew Griffin

RayDunakin <raydu...@aol.com> wrote in article
<19970625192...@ladder02.news.aol.com>...

William R Sherman

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

In article <...>, Miron Schmidt <s59...@tfh-berlin.de> writes:
> Hi!
[snip]
>
> Any volunteers?

Odd that you bring that up now, since it's also a major thread
in another newsgroup that I read -- must be something in the air.

> Miron Schmidt <mi...@comports.com> PGP key on request

As for me: 33. Which puts me at the age just before the home
computer revolution took off, so when I went to school, I was
basically the only kid playing with computers, and everyone
was amazed that a kid could understand how to use computers.
When my high-school decided to add a programming class (my
senior year), they didn't want me to take it since I knew more
than the math teacher who would be teaching the course -- and
I'd been working in a computer store for two years by then.
This is all for context btw, I don't consider it bragging, because
I'm sure most in this ng have similar experiences.

Anyway, as far as I-F goes, I'm still a newby. Despite the fact
that I've been reading r.a.i-f since 1991/2 when I found this cool
program called ITF that allowed people to play infocom games on
their UNIX machines (SGIs, which I used exclusively). That prompted
me to go out and get LTOI I (later II (much later MOI)). Now, I
still haven't gone an finished any games, so most of my playing
experience is still limited to two games: Adventure and Dungeon
(ie. the complete Zork).

My fondest memories were as a freshman in college playing Zork
on my terminal (dialed up to a VAX 780 at 300 baud) with my
roommate, and a big 1.5 liter bottle of wine -- on a few Friday
nights that my fraternity didn't have a party. Often other
guy in the fraternity would stop by to help. Again, as a sign
of the times, my terminal/modem was the only sign of computer
technology in my house at the time.

Prior to college, I played Adventure on some CPM S-100 bus
machine and loved it. I had also seen some Adam's games on
TRS-80s (model I), but was fairly unimpressed. Adventure even
inspired me to begin writing my first "text adventure" -- for
my HP-CV calculator. I came up with a simple world, and
simpler parser, but never really implemented much.

I hope to enter the (co-ed) fraternity of I-F authors soon,
but I have some other writing that needs to get done first.
(that which I am currently procrastinating from doing.)

Ahhh, how cathartic.


BTW, despite not authoring anything yet, I really love this
newsgroup. It has probably the lowest S/N ratio of any USENET
group I've ever seen (in 15 years), and by far some of the best
discussions -- from the programming, theory and media points
of view. Even the off-topic discussions are interesting.

Bill

/*************************************************************************/
/* Bill Sherman (wshe...@ncsa.uiuc.edu) */
/* National Center for Supercomputing Applications */
/* University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign */
/* Og - "You want to do mankind a real service? Tell funnier jokes" */
/* Spinner - "but facts don't always reveal the truth" */
/* Robin - "Yeah, but I always figure that's the writers' fault" */
/*************************************************************************/


-

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

Miron Schmidt wrote:
>
> Hi!

>
> I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.
> Now, I understand that most of us have to be old enough to have experienced
> the old magic when it was still fresh. At this age, it starts to be
> considered rude to ask for details.
> Nevertheless, I _have_ wondered.
> From what I've heard, most of us are around my own age, give or take. So may
> I make a start.
> I'm 25: 26 in two weeks (hey, if anyone happens to be in Berlin at the time,
> you're invited to my birthday party :)).
>
> Any volunteers?
>
> --

> Miron Schmidt <mi...@comports.com> PGP key on request
>
> WATCH TV... MARRY AND REPRODUCE... OBEY... PLAY INTERACTIVE FICTION...
17
I had a BBC B when I was 5-10, and we had 'Circus', but I never really
played that. I played some graphics-text hybrids on it though, like
some educational one set in a tower with completely pointless maths
puzzles in it, and one set in space which I never got anywhere on.

I only got seriously into IF when I had an Archimedes 3000, and Acorn
User put Inform, Advent, and Curses on the cover disk.
--
Nicholas Daley
<dal...@ihug.co.nz>

ryb...@anok4u2.org

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

In article <5or9q7$dfl$1...@europa.frii.com>,

jho...@deimos.frii.com (J. Holder) wrote:
>
> In a fit of lunacy, ryb...@anok4u2.org escribed:
> : 16...please don't hate me....
>
> More likely, you'll find that we are happy that IF is still interesting, and
> can appeal to you as a programmer!


I was being slightly sarcastic. Guess my humour is just too hip for you
ancient 29 year olds!! :) IF has always been a love of mine..first game
kings quest 4, secodn mcmurphies mansion. I was 8 or soemthing...anyone
got the copy of SPAG lying around? I anonymously did a horrible review
of TESS in it, so I've been around awhile. Kinda.

-------------------==== Posted via Deja News ====-----------------------
http://www.dejanews.com/ Search, Read, Post to Usenet

ryb...@anok4u2.org

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

In article <5os455$f...@fido.asd.sgi.com>,
jfra...@dungeon.engr.sgi.com (John Francis) wrote:

>
> In article <8672101...@dejanews.com>, <ryb...@anok4u2.org> wrote:
> >16...please don't hate me....
> >
> Why should we hate you just because you are 16?

I was being silly!

> In fact it might make some of us look on you more favourably.
> Your excruciatingly bad entries in the 1996 interactive fiction

I know they were bad, but did they actualyl cause anyone mental angst or
phyiscal pain? If not, i don't think I did much harm, and I was
surprized that I beat my first stupid game which I found to be quite
clever..

> competition (which are the primary things we have to judge you by)
> become a little more understandable when we remember what it was
> like to be sixteen (I think I can remember that far back ...).

You check out Nimble or my Candy betas? Nimble I'm thinking of canning,
but candy may be my first real try, spell checked and all.

Neil Brown

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

>17
>I had a BBC B when I was 5-10, and we had 'Circus', but I never really
>played that. I played some graphics-text hybrids on it though, like
>some educational one set in a tower with completely pointless maths
>puzzles in it, and one set in space which I never got anywhere on.
>
>I only got seriously into IF when I had an Archimedes 3000, and Acorn
>User put Inform, Advent, and Curses on the cover disk.

Funny, that's almost exactly my story, except that on my BBC B I played
'Adventure' by Kansas Soft (not the 'Adventure' we all know and ?love?)
and later, Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy. Oh, and I'm slightly older
than 17.
______________

Neil James Brown
ne...@highmount.demon.co.uk
http://www.highmount.demon.co.uk

Neil Brown

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

In article <m3u3im6...@loki.lrz-muenchen.de>, Florian Beck

<h729...@sun1.cip.fak14.uni-muenchen.de> wrote:
>Question to IF authors: Is it normal to have started about ten games,
>discarded them all and therefore having zero lines of code after one
>year of writing?

It's not unusual (as our Tom would say). I've only had one game released
so far, and there are another two in the pipeline that may just see the
light of day, but there are something like twelve other games I've
started in a rush of enthusiasm and stopped working on a few days later,
bored with them. They all seemed like really good ideas when I began
them, but they weren't good enough to sustain my interest for very long.

You haven't literally discarded (ie deleted) your source code listings,
have you? If you go back to them, you may find that there are one or two
that aren't as bad as you originally thought. That's what happens with
me, anyway.

Patrick Kellum

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

For some reason, William R Sherman was chatting and out came these words of greatness:

>senior year), they didn't want me to take it since I knew more
>than the math teacher who would be teaching the course -- and

I had an experance like this in, I think, 5th grade. They just got in a
bunch of Commodore PET computers and none of the teachers knew the first
thing about computers so I got the intense ego-boosting pleasure of
teaching a class how to operate and program a computer. Biggest ego-boost
I ever got :-)

>BTW, despite not authoring anything yet, I really love this
>newsgroup. It has probably the lowest S/N ratio of any USENET
>group I've ever seen (in 15 years), and by far some of the best

I've been on the internet for about four years now and this is the most
on-topic newsgroup I've read. Trully my favorite and the first I read
every day.

Patrick
---

"Every weekday morning the school bell cast its glamour over the
surounding hills, calling the young to classes. They came running
down the slopes and leaping over the streams, out from caves and the
hollows of trees and suburban tract homes, impelled by powers greater
then their own to gain an education."
"The Iron Dragon's Daughter" by Michael Swanwick

Patrick Kellum

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

For some reason, ryb...@anok4u2.org was chatting and out came these words of greatness:

>You check out Nimble or my Candy betas? Nimble I'm thinking of canning,
>but candy may be my first real try, spell checked and all.

I hope you finish Candy, looked interesting (although I got a little ill
in the kitchen).

Patrick Kellum

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

For some reason, Neil Brown was chatting and out came these words of greatness:

>started in a rush of enthusiasm and stopped working on a few days later,
>bored with them. They all seemed like really good ideas when I began
>them, but they weren't good enough to sustain my interest for very long.

I tend to start a new game every couple of months, usually based around
some weird idea (outcome based on the feelings of an NPC, weird magic
system, Sonic The Hedgehog as a text adventure, weird stuff like that).
Someday, I hope to actually start something that isn't based on a gimic,
then I might actually finish it :-)

Miron Schmidt

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

I myself wrote:
> I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.

Wow. That's far more answers than I would have expected. Lots of lurkers,
too.
I hope it doesn't disappoint anyone too much if I admit that I only really
wanted to test my new news server and didn't know what to write. :)

The average age seems to be a trifle higher than I thought; more thirty-ish
then twenty-five-ish. I'll make a small anonymous statistic when the thread
has died.

OK, so many people also gave a little personal IF history. Here's mine then.

The first adventure I played was Zork I on a C-64 around 1983. I was
instantly hooked, although I didn't quite grasp the concept of solving
puzzles then. It was the atmosphere that had me squirming in my seat.
After that, Zork II, Adventureland, The Count, The Masquerade.

Lots of adventures on the Apple II, which was the time I first actually
_solved_ a game (Back in Time, anyone remember that?).

I started to write my own somewhere around 1987, 88, using AmigaBASIC. My
parser sucked so bad that I soon dropped it, desperately looking for a
programmer to write around my stories.
Those problems got solved when I discovered ADL, and I started lots of games.
Finished only one, though: a birthday-present for a close friend. You may
have noticed that Ralph claims to be my 10th project, and so it is. The other
publically available is Dark Army (project 005), meant solely as a
programming example in ADL, as it is still unfinished.

Anyway, thanks for your enthusiastic responses (I have really seen worse
waste of bandwidth); I'm looking forward for the postings yet to come.

Volker Blasius

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

Jim MacBrayne wrote:
>
> I'm 54, so that makes me the grandaddy of you all!

But not by much; in 6 weeks I'll have caught up. :)

Volker

Big Mad Drongo

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

- (-@-.-) wrote:
: I had a BBC B when I was 5-10, and we had 'Circus', but I never really

: played that. I played some graphics-text hybrids on it though, like
: some educational one set in a tower with completely pointless maths
: puzzles in it, and one set in space which I never got anywhere on.

The educational one was 'L'. One of my favourite adventures of all time,
that one. I remember having particular trouble with the tree-planting
puzzle, though strangely I managed the telephone quite quickly.

Adrian

J. E. Butterfield

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

John Francis wrote:

> In article <erkyrathE...@netcom.com>,
> Andrew Plotkin <erky...@netcom.com> wrote:
> >Matthew Amster-Burton (mam...@u.washington.edu) wrote:

> >> Miron Schmidt <s59...@tfh-berlin.de> wrote:
> >
> >> >I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f
> community is.

> >> >Now, I understand that most of us have to be old enough to have
> experienced
> >> >the old magic when it was still fresh. At this age, it starts to
> be
> >> >considered rude to ask for details.
> >> >Nevertheless, I _have_ wondered.
> >

> >> As Neil D. put it, I'm far too young to remember Watergate. In
> fact,
> >> I was born over a year after Nixon resigned.
> >
> >Obfuscation, obfuscation... I'm 27.
> >
> When I was 27, IF consisted of ADVENT. In FORTRAN.
> The first release of ZORK was a year away.
>
> (To save you time searching the history files, that makes me 48)

> --
> John Francis jfra...@sgi.com Silicon Graphics, Inc.
> (415)933-8295 2011 N. Shoreline Blvd. MS
> 43U-991
> (415)933-4692 (Fax) Mountain View, CA 94043-1389
> Unsolicited electronic mail will be subject to a $100 handling fee.

I'm 15. BTW, if this looks like part of John Francis' post, it's not. If
it does it's becausemy newsgroup program is new and I haven't figured it
totally out yet.

Ivan Cockrum

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

In article <33B00B17.MD-...@tfh-berlin.de>, Miron Schmidt
<s59...@tfh-berlin.de> wrote:

> Now, I understand that most of us have to be old enough to have experienced
> the old magic when it was still fresh. At this age, it starts to be

Hi, Miron,

I'm 29. The first text adventure I recall playing was one of Scott
Adam's, at age 14 or 15, then I played another about a year later. But it
wasn't until playing HHGTTG at 17 that I really got hooked. After that, I
went out and bought every Infocom game I could get my hands on. I even
started writing a game based on Frank Herbert's "Dune." Spent most of a
summer, coding it in Basic. Unfortunately, the game eventually became so
big that it couldn't be read into the RAM of my Apple IIc, and my
AppleBasic manuals were of poor help in figuring out how to read/write to
disk.

-- Ivan

Matthew Amster-Burton

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

whiz...@uclink.berkeley.edu (Gerry Kevin Wilson) wrote:

>22. But I swear, I'm really 84 at heart.

Then surely you're familiar with the fine pop song "When I'm 84" by
English national heroes the Beautiful South. A worthy rejoinder to
Paul's classic.

Matthew

Mikko P Vuorinen

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

In <8672101...@dejanews.com> ryb...@anok4u2.org writes:

>16...please don't hate me....

I remember when I was 16. I was a nerd who never went out and never had
even kissed a girl. I just sat at my computer playing games (and writing
occasional text adventures in Basic). Now I'm almost 24, I go out now and
then, I have more than kissed a girl, but I still sit at my computer
playing games and IRCing. And I envy those with a life :)

Anyway, the first piece of I-F I played was a C64 adventure called Token
of Ghall. I think I was 10 or so and my English was quite awful at the
time. And then came Eureka and my English skills improved a lot because of
that game. I'll never forget the day I learned the verb 'use'.

And so I got hooked on text adventures and tried to play as many as
possible on my C64. Then I got an Amiga and got my hands on some Infocom
games. And then I got a PC and access to Internet and found the Archive
etc. And now I'm here writing this silly article.


--
)))) (((( + Mikko Vuorinen + Olen hypannyt
)) OO `oo'((( + mvuo...@cc.helsinki.fi + 240 korkeutta
6 (_) ( ((( + http://www.helsinki.fi/~mvuorine/ + Activisionin
`____c 8__/((( + Dilbon@IRC + Decathlonissa.

Staffan Friberg

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

Andrew Plotkin writes:

> In the spirit of prying, I'll point out that in the "About the Author"
> section of Jigsaw, Graham admitted to having been born in 1968.

Of course... All truly great people was born in 1968. ;)

/Staffan (You get a million minus points if you read this before my
other post to this thread.)

BTW. Hi again, everyone! I'm back.

--
/Staffan

Rick Langer

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

Miron Schmidt <s59...@tfh-berlin.de> wrote:
>I have always wondered what the average age of the r.a.i-f community is.

I seem to be toward the upper end of the scale at 40.

>Ask old guy about adventure games

The old geezer says, "Well... I remember getting hooked on 'puters in
'77, programming a Cyber 70. Went nuts when I discovered Adventure.
First system I bought was an Apple ][ Plus (black case, marked as Bell &
Howell). Had to settle with Super Star Trek -- in those days we typed in
our own code -- and Wizardry until they wrote Zork. Yeah, Infocom's
heyday ... things were good back then. Glad to see you young 'uns know a
good thing when you see it. Nelson's a wonder for givin' us Inform ..."

He continues to mumble incoherently as you tip-toe away.
--
Rick Langer (rla...@tiac.net)
TCC - Transcontinental Computer Consulting

Staffan Friberg

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

Miron Schmidt writes:

> Nevertheless, I _have_ wondered.
> From what I've heard, most of us are around my own age, give or take. So may
> I make a start.
> I'm 25: 26 in two weeks (hey, if anyone happens to be in Berlin at the time,
> you're invited to my birthday party :)).
>
> Any volunteers?

Going to your party or revealing our age? :-)

I'm 28.

/Staffan


BPD

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

erky...@netcom.com (Andrew Plotkin) wrote:

>Obfuscation, obfuscation... I'm 27.

>In the spirit of prying, I'll point out that in the "About the Author"

>section of Jigsaw, Graham admitted to having been born in 1968.

I'm 26, and rather horrified to learn you guys aren't that much older
then me but are still much better authors. I mean, you've actually
finished writing more then one short competition game... ;-)

BPD


athol-brose

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

In article <5otbog$fqg$3...@neko.syix.com>,
Patrick Kellum <pat...@syix.com> said (among other things):

>Sonic The Hedgehog as a text adventure

You are on a strip of lush, green lawn. To the west is a rope-and-log
bridge over a waterfall. To the east, the ground slopes sharply upward, as
if it were half of a skateboarder's half-pipe. The top of the quarter-pipe
is roughly eight feet up.

There is a ring here. There is a ring here. There is a ring here. There is
a ring here.

A nervous mechanical porcupine paces back and forth.

>examine porcupine

A red shell with yellow spikes? That's not the proper color for a
porcupine! It must be one of Robotnik's robot helpers!

>jump

Whee!

The porcupine is getting agitated!

>land on porcupine

Splat!
[Your score has gone up by 100.]

>take ring.g.g.g

Ring!
[Your score has gone up by 10.]

Ring!
[Your score has gone up by 10.]

Ring!
[Your score has gone up by 10.]

Ring!
[Your score has gone up by 10.]

>go east

Unable to build up enough speed, you fall backward, ending up where you
started out.

---------------------------

Nah. I just can't see it. :)

--r.

--
r. n. dominick -- cinn...@one.net -- http://w3.one.net/~cinnamon
some things are just pictures - they're scenes before your eyes

Brad O`Donnell

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

Miron Schmidt wrote:

> Any volunteers?

I'm 20, and that means I've been playing IF for well over half
my life. I think about text adventure design more than anyone
should.

First Game: A poorly designed GW-Basic game of unremembered
content or author. (But I was trapped anyway :)


--
Brad O'Donnell
"A story is a string of moments, held together by memory."

John Francis

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

In article <8673061...@dejanews.com>, <ryb...@anok4u2.org> wrote:
>In article <5os455$f...@fido.asd.sgi.com>,
> jfra...@dungeon.engr.sgi.com (John Francis) wrote:
>>
>> In article <8672101...@dejanews.com>, <ryb...@anok4u2.org> wrote:
>> >16...please don't hate me....
>> >
>> Why should we hate you just because you are 16?
>
>I was being silly!
>
>> In fact it might make some of us look on you more favourably.
>> Your excruciatingly bad entries in the 1996 interactive fiction
>
>I know they were bad, but did they actualyl cause anyone mental angst or
>phyiscal pain? If not, i don't think I did much harm, and I was
>surprized that I beat my first stupid game which I found to be quite
>clever..

More of an annoyance than actual physical pain. There were a *lot*
of entries in the competition, and not enough time to play them all.
The time spent playing your games meant I didn't really have enough
time left for "sherbet". Do you think that was a good tradeoff?

>> competition (which are the primary things we have to judge you by)
>> become a little more understandable when we remember what it was
>> like to be sixteen (I think I can remember that far back ...).
>

>You check out Nimble or my Candy betas? Nimble I'm thinking of canning,
>but candy may be my first real try, spell checked and all.

I haven't tried it yet. But judging by the preliminary reports I have
seen on this newsgroup, it seems to be a considerable improvement.
I hope you get some good feedback - I'll let you know what I think
when I find some time to play it. I'll swear the days are getting
shorter - I never seem to have any spare time nowadays.

Katy Mulvey

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Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97
to

On 25 Jun 1997 23:13:20 GMT, This is a test <rsim...@access4.digex.net> wrote:
>J. Holder (jho...@deimos.frii.com) wrote:
>
>: My first experience with IF was at a family day at my father's workplace,
>: Los Alamos National Labs, in 1978. I sat down in front of a high-tech
>: green screen (next to a few old teletypes) and played Crowther & Woods
>: "Adventure" on some old DEC platform. I was a ripe eight years old.
>
>I remember going to my father's workplace and having to play *Yahtzee*. I
>bet your dad could beat up my dad, too. I'm 26.

Hmm. I got to play Dungeon. (I'm 27). I remember Dad taking me in to
work (Computer Consoles, Inc., later bought by Northern Telecom) and
showing me the secret commands I needed to enter to play Dungeon.
(Something along the lines of 'cd /usr/_games; dungeon')

My fondest Dungeon memory, though, is getting Dad to print out the
"instructions" section on computer paper, and using it as a prop in
a school play when I was 11. The play was a musical called "The Gigo
Effect", and I got to be a singing, dancing, computer Glitch.

Let's see, other gaming memories:
+ I remember playing Planetfall with a friend on a Macintosh, and
figuring out how to retrieve the key.

+ Solving the Royal Puzzle in Zork III, on our Atari 800. In
retrospect, I probably wasn't as close to solving it as I
thought I was -- I had all 7 points, and got to the end game
area, and even with clues from a BBS, I could never make the
Implementor follow my instructions.

+ Typing in innumerable games (in BASIC) of all sorts (including adventure
games) from Antic magazine. Wonder if those are still around
anywhere, or if Mom got rid of them when they moved...

I've never written an adventure game, although I've thought about
it plenty of times. I never seem to keep my enthusiasm up past
the very beginning of the planning stages.

Katy

--
Katy Mulvey
Home: mul...@frontiernet.net http://www.frontiernet.net/~mulveyr/Katy

Julian Arnold

unread,
Jun 26, 1997, 3:00:00 AM6/26/97