Legal IF

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Steven Jones

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Oct 25, 1999, 3:00:00 AM10/25/99
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I am writing a game in which the player must defend a man accused of
murder. It is kind of the reverse to 'In the first Degree'. This game
will be set in Sydney, Australia. As Australia, like the U.K. have
seperate solicitors and barristers, how do I allow the player to explore
both the crime investigation side and the trial side of the case?


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Joe Mason

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Oct 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM10/26/99
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Steven Jones <ste...@tsn.cc> wrote:
>I am writing a game in which the player must defend a man accused of
>murder. It is kind of the reverse to 'In the first Degree'. This game
>will be set in Sydney, Australia. As Australia, like the U.K. have
>seperate solicitors and barristers, how do I allow the player to explore
>both the crime investigation side and the trial side of the case?

Law & Order style: first half of the game, have the player be a cop. Second
half, switch PC's to be the lawyer.

Joe

ChaosLady

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Oct 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM10/26/99
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> As Australia, like the U.K. have
> seperate solicitors and barristers, how do I allow the player to
explore
> both the crime investigation side and the trial side of the case?

Why can't a solicitor or barrister do some crime solving himself? You
might get a REALLY conchie one... Maybe if he felt so sorry for the
criminal he might get embroiled in the whole thing himself anyway...
Hol[l]ywood is full of stuff like this :)

Chaoslady

--
--- Imagination is more important than Knowledge. - Albert Einstein

Steven Jones

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Oct 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM10/26/99
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Barristers are not allowed to solicit business directly from the public, they have clients referred to them by solicitors.

LucFrench

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Oct 26, 1999, 3:00:00 AM10/26/99
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>I am writing a game in which the player must defend a man accused of
>murder. It is kind of the reverse to 'In the first Degree'. This game
>will be set in Sydney, Australia. As Australia, like the U.K. have

>seperate solicitors and barristers, how do I allow the player to explore
>both the crime investigation side and the trial side of the case?

Well, you could shift perspective; the first half is viewed from the
soliciter's prospective, and once the trial begins, the PC changes characters.

Or you could do it the way those old "In The First" games did it; namely, the
crime has been commited, the defendant arrested, and you're doing legwork
before trial.

Ask me for further information, if you want it.

Thanks
Luc "LaO" French

TEWoerner

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Nov 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/21/99
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Structurally, I would start in the following manner: writing several
sub-games to be link together in different-situation chapters similar to
"Perdition's Flames". In Flames, however, chapters were finished without
particular results rolling over into the next module. Perhaps you were
planning on carrying all these story endings along. But I have never done
this myself.

Steven Jones <ste...@tsn.cc> wrote in message
news:7v2igp$pd0$1...@nnrp1.deja.com...


> I am writing a game in which the player must defend a man accused of
> murder. It is kind of the reverse to 'In the first Degree'. This game
> will be set in Sydney, Australia. As Australia, like the U.K. have
> seperate solicitors and barristers, how do I allow the player to explore
> both the crime investigation side and the trial side of the case?
>
>

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