Map drawing styles...

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Andy Clifton

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Nov 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/27/99
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For a while I have been playing with the idea of creating a work of IF; while
going over one of my ideas I wondered: how do the pros draw their maps of their
games?
That is, does one draw an floor plan style map, with rooms drawn "to scale"
with shared walls, doors, etc. or does one seperate the rooms and draw
connecting lines indicating passageways? What about out-door scenarios? How
should I keep track of room names, descriptions, decor, etc.?
Any comments?
Andy Clifton
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Kevin Lighton

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Nov 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/27/99
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Andy Clifton <andyc...@cs.comNOSPAM> wrote:
> For a while I have been playing with the idea of creating a work of IF; while
> going over one of my ideas I wondered: how do the pros draw their maps of their
> games?

Well, I've never designed IF professionally, and haven't even done much work
on a game beyond mapping and working out puzzles and goals on paper for years
(and the ones I did make were _dreadful_ treasure hunts done in a system
with an adventure style (verb-DO) parser), but I'll give my thoughts on this.

> That is, does one draw an floor plan style map, with rooms drawn "to scale"
> with shared walls, doors, etc. or does one seperate the rooms and draw
> connecting lines indicating passageways? What about out-door scenarios? How
> should I keep track of room names, descriptions, decor, etc.?
> Any comments?

Use any method that you feel would work for you. You could experiment with
different methods.

A few things that I suspect would be useful regardless of what method you
use:
1. Don't just use numbers on the map and keep a separate list of what room
name goes with what number. It makes looking things up on the map when
testing the game to see if it can be completed awkward, and it doesn't
give you any programming advantage for any of the more flexible systems.
2. If an area has passages that curve (for example, north to go from a to b,
west to go from b to a), multiple passages in vastly different directions
that go along the same route (say, east or west from a goes to b), or areas
where connections might be unclear, use circles/squares connected by lines to
make things clearer to yourself. If you need to know exactly how a group of
rooms fits together, use a floorplan.
3. Don't forget to make notes on what items are where, how to deal with
puzzles, and similar things as well as making a map. I did this with the
adventures I created, started working on one that I had to stop working on for
a while, and then couldn't work out most of what I'd been trying to do when
I got back to it.

Ja, mata
--
Kevin Lighton lig...@bestweb.net or shin...@operamail.com
http://members.tripod.com/~shinma_kl/main.html
"Townsfolk can get downright touchy over the occasional earth-elemental in
the scullery. Can't imagine why..." Quenten _Winds of Fate_

Daniel Barkalow

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Nov 27, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/27/99
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On 27 Nov 1999, Andy Clifton wrote:

> For a while I have been playing with the idea of creating a work of IF;
> while going over one of my ideas I wondered: how do the pros draw
> their maps of their games?

I'm not remotely a pro (still playing around with stuff which will
eventually be games), but I tend not to make maps of games I'm working on
while I'm working on them. I like densely packed games, where there are
relatively few rooms compared to the amount of other stuff going on, and
so I move around in the locations enough to get a feel for them without
needing a map. I sometimes do a floorplan-type map if I want to figure
out how the world fits together, but I can usually just picture the area.

-Iabervon
*This .sig unintentionally changed*


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