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Troels Forchhammer

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Apr 4, 2010, 3:41:47 PM4/4/10
to
. . . or 'what's in a scholarship?'

I don't suppose that much, if any, of the items below are really
'news' to most people here, but I haven't seen any discussions of it
yet, so I thought I'd collect some various on-topic pieces from
around the web -- allowing people to take up any that might appear
interesting.

First, from Wayne and Christina (), there is a new bunch of addenda
and corrigenda to _The J.R.R. Tolkien Companion and Guide_, _J.R.R.
Tolkien: Artist and Illustrator_, _The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's
Companion_, and the 50th anniversary edition of _The Lord of the
Rings_.
<http://wayneandchristina.wordpress.com/2010/03/17/new-addenda-corrigenda/>

From the same hands there was a very good (enlightening and
interesting) essay on the Lord of the Rings Fanatics Plaza website
back at the end of January on some of the issues underlying the
addenda and corrigenda -- issues dealing with reliability and
authenticity (something related to the concept I would call the
Tolkien canon).
<http://www.lotrplaza.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=236962>

Incidentally, I naturally couldn't hold back myself from taking the
'How Millennial Are You' quiz (or test) mentioned in Wayne's latest
blog entry ('The World of Tomorrow' from March 23). I don't know if
there is anything to deduct from the fact that I scored a 67 --
working from a mobile phone company does tend to push one at least
ion that area.


Jason Fisher ('Lingwë') has posted a number of interesting
blog-entries ('bloggings'?) of Tolkien and Inkling relevance.

On 18th February he was happy to announce that his review on Amazon
of a highly disreputable book on Tolkien had been reinstated:
<http://lingwe.blogspot.com/2010/02/at-last-vindication.html>

and on March 3 he could announce that he is the new editor of
_Mythprint_ (the journal of the Mythopoeic society) -- naturally I
congratulate Jason on this position of trust and wish him all the
best in his work:
<http://lingwe.blogspot.com/2010/03/new-editor-of-mythprint.html>

The 'Word of the Day' on March 12 was oligopsony -- which led to
discussion of whether this is a valid description of the market for
Tolkien-related books
<http://lingwe.blogspot.com/2010/03/word-of-day-oligopsony.html>

Jason has also discussed (29th March) the 1935 statement by C.S.
Lewis that he hoped that 'Professor Tolkien will soon, [...], be
ready to publish an alliterative poem' -- in particular _which poem_
was Lewis referring to?
<http://lingwe.blogspot.com/2010/03/before-tolkiens-unexpected-party.html>

Finally he refers to yet another list where LotR has come up on top,
and asks whether the popularity of Tolkien is strengthened by the
number of 'fanboys' 'scribbling away obsessively on blogs and
discussion groups' about Tolkien's works -- which of course has
quickly mentions the question of the chicken and the egg and other
things related to Tolkien fandom in particular.
<http://lingwe.blogspot.com/2010/04/novel-kind-of-march-madness.html>


John Rateliff's blog, 'Sacnoth's Scriptorium', has also featured a
number of interesting posts lately. Thus there is a curious
discussion (in two parts) of Tolkien's description of Ireland as 'a
country naturally evil.'
<http://sacnoths.blogspot.com/2010/01/tolkien-on-ireland-part-two.html>

Upon the arrival of the journal _VII_ he discussed, among other
things, the extreme importance of good reviews (that is, where the
review itself is of high quality) in such areas as Tolkien
scholarships where the number of new titles far exceeds the ability
of any one person to read
<http://sacnoths.blogspot.com/2010/01/new-arrival-vii.html>
the discussion in the comments led to a later blogging titled
'Recommended Reading (Tolkien)' in which he lists what he considers
the best of Tolkien criticism
<http://sacnoths.blogspot.com/2010/01/recommended-reading-tolkien.html>

Another blogging takes up a discussion of an article elsewhere
titled 'Distributism in the Shire'
<http://sacnoths.blogspot.com/2010/01/tolkien-and-distributists.html>

Rateliff is also much interested in roleplaying games and he was of
course interested to note the announcement of an upcoming
Tolkien-related roleplaying game
<http://sacnoths.blogspot.com/2010/01/new-tolkien-roleplaying-game.html>

Of more interest here may be the discussion of the various origins
of the word 'Hobbit', though I am not sure how interesting I find
this question once we have stopped questioning Tolkien's
recollection of independent invention (see e.g. letter #25), but
still :-)
<http://sacnoths.blogspot.com/2010/02/when-is-hobbil-hobbit.html>

Inspired by yet another piece of (bad) Tolkien criticism found on
the 'net, John responds to allegations that Tolkien could not have
been a 'true' Christian (apparently 'true Christian' as a very
narrow meaning to the original critic):
<http://sacnoths.blogspot.com/2010/03/pharisees-are-always-with-us.html>

In connection with a statement from C.S. Lewis on Ireland, Rateliff
notes that sometimes a single word can say quite a lot:
<http://sacnoths.blogspot.com/2010/03/sometimes-single-word-says-so-much.html>

Going back to original comments on Tolkien, John notes, based on
listening to _The Faerie Queene_ as audiobook, a certain Tolkienian
echo:
<http://sacnoths.blogspot.com/2010/03/tolkienian-echo.html>
Not being familiar myself with Spenser's work, I find it very
difficult to comment on this.

Large (more than 6') black, spherical stones -- does that ring a
bell? In this case they are, however, from Costa Rica. They were
discovered in the 1930s and were described in an American journal,
of which Tolkien is known to have subscribed to the British
counterpart, in 1943. Tolkien wrote about the Stone of Erech late in
1944, making a link possible (though still very tenuous). This is
the first suggestion I recall coming across of a possible
inspiration for the Stone of Erech other than original invention by
Tolkien -- I would have to emphasize that I would not think any less
of Tolkien's work for identifying sources -- it is not where you get
the ingredients for your particular soup that is important, but how
you mix them and serve them.
<http://sacnoths.blogspot.com/2010/04/las-bolas-de-erech.html>

Finally, Rateliff's last entry is a preliminary criticism on a
Tolkien-related book that has recently arrived. To put it very
briefly, he is _not_ impressed, so I'd advice not investing $50 in
Jeremy Mark Robinson's _J. R. R. Tolkien: the Books, the Films, the
Whole Cultural Phenomenon; Including a Scene-by-scene Analysis of
the 2001-2003 Lord of the Rings Films_ until there are some more
positive reviews available.
<http://sacnoths.blogspot.com/2010/04/new-arrival-puzzling.html>


The Tolkien Library, <http://www.tolkienlibrary.com/index.php> notes
a lot of new Tolkien-related releases, and often includes interviews
with the authors. Over just the last few months, Pieter has listed a
number of new editions:

_West of the Mountains, East of the Sea_ - the last of a series of
three map-packages of Middle-earth:
<http://www.tolkienlibrary.com/press/908-West_of_the_moutains.php>
I have ordered these (I have always been something of a map-freak),
and if anyone wishes so, I'd be happy to review them here once they
arrive.

_The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún_ paperback:
<http://www.tolkienlibrary.com/press/935-Legend_Sigurd_Gudrun_Paperback.php>

_A Tolkien English Glossary - A Guide to Old Uncommon and Archaic
Words Used in The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings_ (sometimes these
titles seem interminable)
<http://www.tolkienlibrary.com/press/938-Tolkien_English_Glossary.php>

And others -- including a _J.R.R. Tolkien Pocket Guide_ by the same
author that Rateliff was so unhappy with in his latest blogging
(Rateliff mentions the pocket guide which he assumes is just as
riddled with errors as the larger book).


Michael Drout ('Wormtalk and Slugspeak') has blogged about many
things lately -- from the intricacies of academia and his own
research to more peripherical subjects. The only Tolkien-related
blogging was the announcement of the Tolkien bibliography going
on-line:
<http://wormtalk.blogspot.com/2010/03/tolkien-bibliography-online.html>
In essence this is a database of scholarship on Tolkien, and it
does, in my not so objective opinion, fully make up for the lack of
any other Tolkien-related entries from his hand.


The Tolkien Professor, Corey Olsen from Washington College, is now
lecturing on _The Lord of the Rings_. I have mentioned this series
of podcasted lectures previously, and I still think it would be a
good idea to do a 'podcast of the week' series here where we go
through both the podcasts and the subject matter of the podcasts.
<http://www.tolkienprofessor.com/lectures/wc_class.html>
and the discussion boards at
<http://tolkienprof.forumer.com/>


New Links:
These are links to sites that are, to me, fairly new.

<http://www.sauronsblog.com/>
Sauron's Blog is a humorous attempt to blog from Sauron's viewpoint.
Usually quite amusing, occasionally very funny.

<http://tolkienbibliography.org/>
until further this redirects to
<http://www.wheatoncollege.edu/acad/english/tolkien/>
This is the on-line database of scholarship on Tolkien that Drout
mentions.

<http://www.johngarth.co.uk/index.php>
If I have discovered John Garth's web site previously, then I have
certainly forgotten and failed to bookmark it. The most interesting
bits is an article on 'Tolkien, Exeter College and the Great War'
and the information that he intends to add to the site based on his
research into the TCBS and their military careers. This, however, is
still go come, so we'll have to check back occasionally to see if
there is anything new.

<http://www.festivalintheshire.com/>
The web site for the Tolkien convention 'Festival in the Shire' this
summer. Of particular interest is the journal
<http://www.festivalintheshire.com/journal/>
which features a number of very interesting interviews and other
articles.


<http://thinknet.wordpress.com/2009/11/28/reply-to-a-j-r-r-tolkien-wave/>
A rather curious idea presented first, as the author says, in a
J.R.R. Tolkien wave. The author tries to argue that Vedas and
Zoroastrian tradition is a major inspiration for Tolkien, but I
admit that I don't buy it -- certainly not as a primary
inpspiration, though I'd be very interested to see any evidence at
all that Tolkien was actually familiar with this tradition (the
author, I'm afraid, does not offer any such evidence).


This, I think, is more or less it -- clearly I have missed out on a
lot of interesting stuff on sites and blogs that I don't read (one
just cannot read everything) but feel free to add anything that I
have missed. I have tried to prevent the URLs from wrapping (the
longest line should be 79 characters), but if anyone has a problem,
I'd be happy to provide a shortened URL.

--
Troels Forchhammer <troelsfo(a)googlewave.com>
Valid e-mail is <troelsfo(a)gmail.com>
Please put [AFT], [RABT] or 'Tolkien' in subject.

One who cannot cast away a treasure at need is in fetters.
- Aragorn "Strider", /Two Towers/ (J.R.R. Tolkien)

Öjevind Lång

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Apr 5, 2010, 8:25:48 AM4/5/10
to
"Troels Forchhammer" <Tro...@ThisIsFake.invalid> skrev i meddelandet
news:Xns9D50DCB5...@130.133.4.11...

> . . . or 'what's in a scholarship?'
>
> I don't suppose that much, if any, of the items below are really
> 'news' to most people here, but I haven't seen any discussions of it
> yet, so I thought I'd collect some various on-topic pieces from
> around the web -- allowing people to take up any that might appear
> interesting.
>
> First, from Wayne and Christina (), there is a new bunch of addenda
> and corrigenda to _The J.R.R. Tolkien Companion and Guide_, _J.R.R.
> Tolkien: Artist and Illustrator_, _The Lord of the Rings: A Reader's
> Companion_, and the 50th anniversary edition of _The Lord of the
> Rings_.
> <http://wayneandchristina.wordpress.com/2010/03/17/new-addenda-corrigenda/>

I was interested in this item:

"pp. 72-4, entry for Arthur Owen Barfield: In an interview conducted in
September 1991 Barfield was asked how far he knew Tolkien. 'I didn't know
him very well', he replied. 'I met him a number of times at meetings of the
Inklings - I didn't go always - and also with Lewis. Once we had a short
walking tour, Lewis, Tolkien, and I, just when the [Second World] war was
threatening, but then we never talked as we [Barfield and the interviewer]
are talking now. And I never became an enthusiast for The Lord of the Rings.'
In response to the interviewer's comment that he 'got stuck on page 337' of
The Lord of the Rings, Barfield stated that he didn't think that he 'got
quite as far as that', but he 'got The Hobbit, read it to my son' (p. 30).
See further, Elmar Schenkel, 'Interview mit Owen Barfield', Inklings
Jahrbuch für Literatur und Ästhetik 11 (1993), pp. 23-38. - See also Simon
Blaxland-de Lange, Owen Barfield: Romanticism Come of Age: A Biography
(Forest Row, East Sussex: Temple Lodge, 2006). On p. 54, Barfield is quoted
as writing to novelist Saul Bellow: 'I did get hold of [Bellow's novel]
Humboldt's Gift and may as well confess that I couldn't get up enough
interest in enough of what was going on to be held by it. If it's any
comfort to you . . . I had very much the same experience with the Lord of
the Rings.'"

This is the Barfield to whose daughter Lucy Lewis dedicated the first of the
Narnia books. Barfield wrote an extremely readable book called "History in
English Words". Interesting that he seems to have been rather reserved
towards Tolkien. Perhaps the fact that Barfield was a leading proponent of
anthroposophy and Tolkien an very conservative Catholic complicated
relations between them. (That Barfield didn't much care for LotR probaby
didn't help.)

> From the same hands there was a very good (enlightening and
> interesting) essay on the Lord of the Rings Fanatics Plaza website
> back at the end of January on some of the issues underlying the
> addenda and corrigenda -- issues dealing with reliability and
> authenticity (something related to the concept I would call the
> Tolkien canon).
> <http://www.lotrplaza.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=236962>

There my eye was caught by the following:

"To give an early example of what we mean by this, one of the first books
written about Tolkien was The Tolkien Relation (1968) [1] by William Ready,
once the Director of Libraries at Marquette University who established its
superb collection of Tolkien manuscripts. On the face of it, his credentials
were good, and his 'personal enquiry' had at least the appearance of
substance. He was, however, neither an accurate biographer nor a perceptive
critic. As Richard West reported in 1970, The Tolkien Relation 'repeats,
with very little filling out, biographical details already in print; but
some of the dates given are wrong (e.g., Mr. Ready kindly, but inaccurately,
adds six years to the life-span of Tolkien's mother), and even the slight
commentary is suspect, since it is predicated on a long and close
association between the author and his subject and Tolkien has publicly
denied the allegation.' [2] Ready's most notorious statement is that Tolkien's
mother, Mabel Suffield, before her marriage 'had worked with her sisters as
a missionary among the women of the Sultan of Zanzibar' (p. 6)."

I read "The Tolkien Relation" when it first appeared, and even then it was
clear that the man was making up tings, and also that he had no true
appreciation of "The Lord of the Rings". On the other hand, I think it was
wrongheaded of Hammand and Scull to refuse to use Grotta's book about
Tolkien, erratic though it might be, since Grotta did have access to
interesting material such as "access to the letters of Tolkien's American
undergraduate friend Allen Barnett". Also, Grotta interviewed Tolkien's son
Michael, who did not participate in the Tolkien family's general boycott of
him.

[snip]

> Jason Fisher ('Lingwë') has posted a number of interesting
> blog-entries ('bloggings'?) of Tolkien and Inkling relevance.
>
> On 18th February he was happy to announce that his review on Amazon
> of a highly disreputable book on Tolkien had been reinstated:
> <http://lingwe.blogspot.com/2010/02/at-last-vindication.html>

His information about Dirk Vander Ploeg made me shake my head. The man
thinks mankind "was seeded by an alien race"? Wow. Lingwë's tribulations
when writing a reveiw of the man's book at Amazon.com reminds me of my
tribualtions when I added information to a Wikiepia article about an SS
general (and mass mruderer) called Kurt Meyer. My information (which was
well sourced by references to Anthony Beevor's book about "D-Day") was
repeatedly deleted, and I was amazingly enough accused of perpetrating a
"hoax", until I gave up because I didn't want some busybody to turn up and
accuse me of "coducting an edit war". One of several episodes that have
pretty much made me give up on Wikipedia. (Anyone interested can study the
history and discussion sections of the article about the vile Nazi murderer
Meyer.)

[snip]

> The 'Word of the Day' on March 12 was oligopsony -- which led to
> discussion of whether this is a valid description of the market for
> Tolkien-related books
> <http://lingwe.blogspot.com/2010/03/word-of-day-oligopsony.html>

"Oligopsony"? Never heard of it. But if, as Robert Burchfield says, it
should be glossed as follows:

"oligopsony (from the prefix oligo-, Greek ?????? 'small', in plural
[??????] 'few', and ??????? 'to buy provisions') first recorded in 1943 in
the sense 'in marketing, a situation in which only a small number of buyers
exists for a product' [.]. [1]",

then I dont think it can be used to describe books about Tolkien. There's
quite a market for them.

[snip]

> John Rateliff's blog, 'Sacnoth's Scriptorium', has also featured a
> number of interesting posts lately. Thus there is a curious
> discussion (in two parts) of Tolkien's description of Ireland as 'a
> country naturally evil.'
> <http://sacnoths.blogspot.com/2010/01/tolkien-on-ireland-part-two.html>

Oh, I think that was just his dislike of the Gaelic language rubbing off.

[snip]

> In connection with a statement from C.S. Lewis on Ireland, Rateliff
> notes that sometimes a single word can say quite a lot:
> <http://sacnoths.blogspot.com/2010/03/sometimes-single-word-says-so-much.html>

I think Rateliff reads far too much into it. Of course Lewis would feel
British, and speak about "our claim to Ireland" from a British point of
view. What on earth is so remarkable about that? He was raised as an Ulster
protestant and spent the rest of his life in England, so nothing new there.

[snip]

> _The Legend of Sigurd and Gudrún_ paperback:
> <http://www.tolkienlibrary.com/press/935-Legend_Sigurd_Gudrun_Paperback.php>

Don't read that stuff! The geuine article (the Icelandic sagas) is
infinitely preferable.

> _A Tolkien English Glossary - A Guide to Old Uncommon and Archaic
> Words Used in The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings_ (sometimes these
> titles seem interminable)
> <http://www.tolkienlibrary.com/press/938-Tolkien_English_Glossary.php>

That sounds interesting.

[snip]

> <http://www.sauronsblog.com/>
> Sauron's Blog is a humorous attempt to blog from Sauron's viewpoint.
> Usually quite amusing, occasionally very funny.

I agree, though after a couple of pages, my attention started to wander.

[snip]

Thanks for taking all this trouble, Troels.

Öjevind

Derek Broughton

unread,
Apr 5, 2010, 8:15:23 AM4/5/10
to
Troels Forchhammer wrote:

> . . . or 'what's in a scholarship?'

Oh, so much interesting reading for a holiday Monday. Thank you Troels.

> Inspired by yet another piece of (bad) Tolkien criticism found on
> the 'net, John responds to allegations that Tolkien could not have
> been a 'true' Christian (apparently 'true Christian' as a very
> narrow meaning to the original critic):
> <http://sacnoths.blogspot.com/2010/03/pharisees-are-always-with-us.html>

Well, duh... He was a Roman Catholic, which would make him not a "true
Christian" to huge numbers of protestants.

> Large (more than 6') black, spherical stones -- does that ring a
> bell?

Raiders of the Lost Ark...

They made the science news on a couple of CBC radio spots in the last two
weeks. I thought /Quirks and Quarks/ talked about them, but I see no sign
of it in the last three weeks. I wasn't really listening except to hear the
scientist say that whatever they _were_ used for, booby traps for Indiana
Jones doesn't seem to be an option.

> In this case they are, however, from Costa Rica. They were
> discovered in the 1930s and were described in an American journal,
> of which Tolkien is known to have subscribed to the British
> counterpart, in 1943. Tolkien wrote about the Stone of Erech late in
> 1944, making a link possible (though still very tenuous). This is
> the first suggestion I recall coming across of a possible
> inspiration for the Stone of Erech other than original invention by
> Tolkien -- I would have to emphasize that I would not think any less
> of Tolkien's work for identifying sources -- it is not where you get
> the ingredients for your particular soup that is important, but how
> you mix them and serve them.
> <http://sacnoths.blogspot.com/2010/04/las-bolas-de-erech.html>

Even if she did suggest they'd solved the mystery, this investigator clearly
felt it had been a mystery until she got involved. So there could hardly
have been much "borrowing" by Tolkien. OK, it's a 6' stone sphere...

--
derek

Derek Broughton

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Apr 5, 2010, 10:04:12 AM4/5/10
to
Öjevind Lång wrote:

> "Troels Forchhammer" <Tro...@ThisIsFake.invalid> skrev i meddelandet
> news:Xns9D50DCB5...@130.133.4.11...
>

>> Jason Fisher ('Lingwë') has posted a number of interesting
>> blog-entries ('bloggings'?) of Tolkien and Inkling relevance.
>>
>> On 18th February he was happy to announce that his review on Amazon
>> of a highly disreputable book on Tolkien had been reinstated:
>> <http://lingwe.blogspot.com/2010/02/at-last-vindication.html>
>
> His information about Dirk Vander Ploeg made me shake my head. The man
> thinks mankind "was seeded by an alien race"? Wow.

Lingwë admits he devoted more effort to this than it deserved. When you
look at the reviews on the site - two negative, and the others wildly
positive, it's clear that even the most beautifully, accurately, written
negative review would make no impression on the people who are going to read
the book. I'm certainly not surprised. I remember when Von Danniken
published "Chariots of the Gods", when I was about 13. I never believed it,
but I always felt that it would be wonderful if true. The believers are
still out there, and all they want is _something_ to believe.

And personally, I liked the other reviews better than Lingwë's :-) Nobody
really wants to read a review by somebody who says he didn't actually finish
the book. In fact, I don't much care for negative reviews at all - time's
too short. I want somebody to enthusiastically tell me what they enjoyed,
and infect me with that enthusiasm.
--
derek

Troels Forchhammer

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Apr 5, 2010, 2:45:08 PM4/5/10
to
In message <news:81u36b...@mid.individual.net>
锟絡evind L锟絥g <ojevin...@bredband.net> spoke these staves:
>
> "Troels Forchhammer" <Tro...@ThisIsFake.invalid> skrev i
> meddelandet news:Xns9D50DCB5...@130.133.4.11...
>>

<snip>

_Truth or Consequences: A Cautionary Tale of Tolkien Studies_ by
Wayne G. Hammond & Christina Scull:

>> <http://www.lotrplaza.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=236962>

<snip>

> On the other hand, I think it was wrongheaded of Hammand and Scull
> to refuse to use Grotta's book about Tolkien, erratic though it
> might be, since Grotta did have access to interesting material
> such as "access to the letters of Tolkien's American undergraduate
> friend Allen Barnett". Also, Grotta interviewed Tolkien's son
> Michael, who did not participate in the Tolkien family's general
> boycott of him.

I haven't read Grotta's book, so I cannot comment on this specific
case, but I would say that while it is, in general, a weighty
argument that the author has had access to rare sources, it should
never be sufficient in itself. If the author's treatment of known
sources is wanting (lack of source-criticism, direct mistakes etc.)
and if there are specific reasons for doubting his treatment of the
rare sources (such as, for instance, attributing to Tolkien text
clearly written in American vernacular), then I think it is fully
justified to simply dismiss everything rather than attempt to verify
every single point. _If_ Grotta is guilty of such poor scholarship,
then I think it is justified to simply dismiss his book and not look
back. Overall I would rather that Hammond and Scull err on the side
of caution instead of perpetuating what may be simple inventions --
their Companion and Guide has rapidly become a de facto standard
work.

<snip>

>> _The Legend of Sigurd and Gudr锟絥_ paperback:


>> <http://www.tolkienlibrary.com/press/935-Legend_Sigurd_Gudrun_Paperback.php>
>
> Don't read that stuff! The geuine article (the Icelandic sagas) is
> infinitely preferable.

One of my problems is that I can't read it in the original, and none
of the Danish translations that I have of the Eddas is in the
authentic alliterative meter, and I do find the skaldic poetic forms
to be particularly moving. Tolkien was a master at this, and I might
buy this simply for the joy of the fornyr锟絠slag ;-)

>> _A Tolkien English Glossary - A Guide to Old Uncommon and Archaic
>> Words Used in The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings_ (sometimes
>> these titles seem interminable)
>> <http://www.tolkienlibrary.com/press/938-Tolkien_English_Glossary.php>
>
> That sounds interesting.

Yes, it does, rather.

One of the themes that has been emerging is the need for good
reviews -- and particularly for good reviewers -- of books about
Tolkien. There is so much published and only a fraction of it is
actually worth buying, so we need to have some good and reliable
reviewers that can point out the books that are really best value
for the money. I am still not in a position to buy the new stuff as
it arrives, but at least I am catching up on the 'classics' of
Tolkien criticism, but only because I have had other readers
recommend to me the most valuable.

>> <http://www.sauronsblog.com/>
>> Sauron's Blog is a humorous attempt to blog from Sauron's
>> viewpoint. Usually quite amusing, occasionally very funny.
>
> I agree, though after a couple of pages, my attention started to
> wander.

Right -- I follow the new stuff, and have read the older pages in a
more leisurely way when I find the time and the inclination to read
a bit further.

--
Troels Forchhammer <troelsfo(a)googlewave.com>
Valid e-mail is <troelsfo(a)gmail.com>
Please put [AFT], [RABT] or 'Tolkien' in subject.

The opposite of a correct statement is a false statement.
But the opposite of a profound truth may well be another
profound truth.
- Niels Bohr

Odysseus

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Apr 11, 2010, 7:02:28 PM4/11/10
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In article <rr0p87-...@morgen.pointerstop.ca>,
Derek Broughton <de...@pointerstop.ca> wrote:

<snip>


>
> > Large (more than 6') black, spherical stones -- does that ring a
> > bell?

<http://web.ku.edu/~hoopes/balls/>

> Raiders of the Lost Ark...
>
> They made the science news on a couple of CBC radio spots in the last two
> weeks. I thought /Quirks and Quarks/ talked about them, but I see no sign
> of it in the last three weeks. I wasn't really listening except to hear the
> scientist say that whatever they _were_ used for, booby traps for Indiana
> Jones doesn't seem to be an option.

It was on the March 31 edition of _As It Happens_. I don't recall
another story about it -- did you perhaps hear both the evening and
late-night broadcasts of the same show?

<http://www.cbc.ca/radioshows/AS_IT_HAPPENS/20100331.shtml>

(scroll down to "Giant Balls")

--
Odysseus

Derek Broughton

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Apr 12, 2010, 8:29:40 AM4/12/10
to
Odysseus wrote:

> In article <rr0p87-...@morgen.pointerstop.ca>,
> Derek Broughton <de...@pointerstop.ca> wrote:
>
> <snip>
>>
>> > Large (more than 6') black, spherical stones -- does that ring a
>> > bell?
>
> <http://web.ku.edu/~hoopes/balls/>
>
>> Raiders of the Lost Ark...
>>
>> They made the science news on a couple of CBC radio spots in the last two
>> weeks. I thought /Quirks and Quarks/ talked about them, but I see no
>> sign
>> of it in the last three weeks. I wasn't really listening except to hear
>> the scientist say that whatever they _were_ used for, booby traps for
>> Indiana Jones doesn't seem to be an option.
>
> It was on the March 31 edition of _As It Happens_. I don't recall
> another story about it -- did you perhaps hear both the evening and
> late-night broadcasts of the same show?
>

That's _always_ a possibility, and given that I recall so little of it as it
is, I probably thought at the time that I was hearing a whole new interview
:-)
--
derek

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