Recent Reading

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Stephen Kane

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Feb 15, 2004, 7:43:37 PM2/15/04
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Haven't been reading much on topic for the group lately!

The Willows In Winter by William Horwood - this was disappointing, given
that I love both Grahame's original and Horwood's non-Duncton novels
(especially The Stonor Eagles). I found the sequel to be a bit of a parson's
egg - Toad at least was done quite well but most if not all of the other
characters didn't quite ring true.

The Book of Atrix Wolfe by Patricia McKillip - I loved this, especially the
fabulously rich prose describing the veritable orgy of food created in the
castle kitchens. Thanks again, Debbie, for the recommendation!

The Ogre Downstairs by Diana Wynne Jones - hadn't read this since I was
about ten years old and it was still almost as good! One small quibble -
surely Douglas and Malcolm at least would have studied Latin at school and
therefore spotted the clues in the names of the magical ingredients?

Shards of Honour by Lois McMaster Bujold - NOT for children and only on
topic because it was recommended to me in this group many moons ago. Thought
it was brilliant and will definitely have to read the rest now - as before,
thanks Debbie!

Stephen.

D. Gascoyne

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Feb 15, 2004, 11:20:33 PM2/15/04
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"Stephen Kane" <no...@none.com> wrote in message
news:BC55C2B8.11E6F%no...@none.com...

> Haven't been reading much on topic for the group lately!
> >
> The Book of Atrix Wolfe by Patricia McKillip - I loved this, especially
the
> fabulously rich prose describing the veritable orgy of food created in the
> castle kitchens. Thanks again, Debbie, for the recommendation!

You're very welcome! Glad you enjoyed it :) Now you have to read _In the
Forest of Serre_, which I've just read - her best in a while, I think.


>
> The Ogre Downstairs by Diana Wynne Jones - hadn't read this since I was
> about ten years old and it was still almost as good! One small quibble -
> surely Douglas and Malcolm at least would have studied Latin at school and
> therefore spotted the clues in the names of the magical ingredients?

I loved that! As a lapsed Classicist, I also got a huge kick out of the
Greek that the dragon teeth guys speak - they say things like "Lemme at 'im"
and it looks like genuine Greek.


>
> Shards of Honour by Lois McMaster Bujold - NOT for children and only on
> topic because it was recommended to me in this group many moons ago.
Thought
> it was brilliant and will definitely have to read the rest now - as
before,
> thanks Debbie!

Again, you're welcome :) Have you read _The Curse of Chalion_ yet???
>

Debbie


Elaine Thompson

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Feb 16, 2004, 10:48:27 AM2/16/04
to
On Mon, 16 Feb 2004 04:20:33 GMT, "D. Gascoyne"
<chuml...@netscape.net> wrote:

>
>"Stephen Kane" <no...@none.com> wrote in message
>news:BC55C2B8.11E6F%no...@none.com...
>> Haven't been reading much on topic for the group lately!
>> >
>> The Book of Atrix Wolfe by Patricia McKillip - I loved this, especially
>the
>> fabulously rich prose describing the veritable orgy of food created in the
>> castle kitchens. Thanks again, Debbie, for the recommendation!
>
>You're very welcome! Glad you enjoyed it :) Now you have to read _In the
>Forest of Serre_, which I've just read - her best in a while, I think.


I preferred _Ombria_ to _Serre_ the characters came across more
vividly to me. And just finished _Alphabet of Thorns_ which was (of
course) excellent, but needs a bit of time to settle and a reread, I
think. I think there were lots of subtle links between sections I
didn't quite catch. But on the first reading I also got several
_Riddlemaster_ echoes.

Are these later McKillips considered children's books?

>>
>> The Ogre Downstairs by Diana Wynne Jones - hadn't read this since I was
>> about ten years old and it was still almost as good! One small quibble -
>> surely Douglas and Malcolm at least would have studied Latin at school and
>> therefore spotted the clues in the names of the magical ingredients?
>
>I loved that! As a lapsed Classicist, I also got a huge kick out of the
>Greek that the dragon teeth guys speak - they say things like "Lemme at 'im"
>and it looks like genuine Greek.


Wonderful what a different alphabet lets a writer get away with, isn't
it? I enjoyed it too, as I was studying Greek when I finally got
hold of a copy of the book.


>>
>> Shards of Honour by Lois McMaster Bujold - NOT for children and only on
>> topic because it was recommended to me in this group many moons ago.
>Thought
>> it was brilliant and will definitely have to read the rest now - as
>before,
>> thanks Debbie!
>
>Again, you're welcome :) Have you read _The Curse of Chalion_ yet???


And the companion _Paladin of Souls_.

--
Elaine Thompson <Ela...@KEThompson.org>

D. Gascoyne

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Feb 16, 2004, 6:29:31 PM2/16/04
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"Elaine Thompson" <Ela...@KEThompson.org> wrote in message
news:h4p130dk6t6602f7l...@4ax.com...

> On Mon, 16 Feb 2004 04:20:33 GMT, "D. Gascoyne"
> <chuml...@netscape.net> wrote:
>
> >
> >"Stephen Kane" <no...@none.com> wrote in message
> >news:BC55C2B8.11E6F%no...@none.com...
> >> Haven't been reading much on topic for the group lately!
> >> >
> >> The Book of Atrix Wolfe by Patricia McKillip - I loved this, especially
> >the
> >> fabulously rich prose describing the veritable orgy of food created in
the
> >> castle kitchens. Thanks again, Debbie, for the recommendation!
> >
> >You're very welcome! Glad you enjoyed it :) Now you have to read _In
the
> >Forest of Serre_, which I've just read - her best in a while, I think.
>
>
> I preferred _Ombria_ to _Serre_ the characters came across more
> vividly to me. And just finished _Alphabet of Thorns_ which was (of
> course) excellent, but needs a bit of time to settle and a reread, I
> think. I think there were lots of subtle links between sections I
> didn't quite catch. But on the first reading I also got several
> _Riddlemaster_ echoes.
>
> Are these later McKillips considered children's books?
Oh golly, is there yet another new McKillip? It's funny, but I found more
Riddlemaster echoes in Serre than Ombria. I liked Ombria, but found towards
the end that it drifted into her detached dreamlike quality which is lovely
but I find rather distancing.

And I don't think any of these later ones are considered strictly children's
books.

Debbie

Elaine Thompson

unread,
Feb 16, 2004, 8:09:04 PM2/16/04
to
On Mon, 16 Feb 2004 23:29:31 GMT, "D. Gascoyne"
<chuml...@netscape.net> wrote:

me:

>> I preferred _Ombria_ to _Serre_ the characters came across more
>> vividly to me. And just finished _Alphabet of Thorns_ which was (of
>> course) excellent, but needs a bit of time to settle and a reread, I
>> think. I think there were lots of subtle links between sections I
>> didn't quite catch. But on the first reading I also got several
>> _Riddlemaster_ echoes.
>>
>> Are these later McKillips considered children's books?


Debbie G


>Oh golly, is there yet another new McKillip?

Yep, just a few weeks out.

>It's funny, but I found more
>Riddlemaster echoes in Serre than Ombria. I liked Ombria, but found towards
>the end that it drifted into her detached dreamlike quality which is lovely
>but I find rather distancing.

Yes, I sometimes miss the immediacy she put in her earlier works.

I don't recall Riddlemaster echoes in Ombria or SERRe, I do remember
how vividly the characters came across.


Now I recently reread TOWER IN STONY WOOD, and the back of my mind
kept (and still is) insisting that it's a redo of her *very* early
THROME OF THE ERRIL OF SHERRIL. Although aside from the structure
being a knight on a quest in both, I'm having trouble seeing why. And
what the knight finds and accomplishes not being what he thinks he's
supposed to find and accomplish.....shrug


--
Elaine Thompson <Ela...@KEThompson.org>

D. Gascoyne

unread,
Feb 17, 2004, 12:23:33 AM2/17/04
to

"Elaine Thompson" <Ela...@KEThompson.org> wrote in message
news:p1q230df5k6ik9uch...@4ax.com...
:

>
> I don't recall Riddlemaster echoes in Ombria or SERRe, I do remember
> how vividly the characters came across.
>
Oops, sorry - I realized on rereading your post that you were talking about
_Alphabet_ - that makes me eager to read it! I did, however, find some
Riddlemaster echoes in Serre - maybe it was the forest and the dogged,
practical woman who reminded me a bit of Raederle.

> Now I recently reread TOWER IN STONY WOOD, and the back of my mind
> kept (and still is) insisting that it's a redo of her *very* early
> THROME OF THE ERRIL OF SHERRIL. Although aside from the structure
> being a knight on a quest in both, I'm having trouble seeing why. And
> what the knight finds and accomplishes not being what he thinks he's
> supposed to find and accomplish.....shrug
>

Yes - you know what, I had the same reaction! And I don't really know what
set it off either, except as you say the knight riding round and round and
not really getting anywhere...

Debbie


Elaine Thompson

unread,
Feb 17, 2004, 3:51:01 PM2/17/04
to
On Tue, 17 Feb 2004 05:23:33 GMT, "D. Gascoyne"
<chuml...@netscape.net> wrote:

>
>"Elaine Thompson" <Ela...@KEThompson.org> wrote in message
>news:p1q230df5k6ik9uch...@4ax.com...
>:
>>
>> I don't recall Riddlemaster echoes in Ombria or SERRe, I do remember
>> how vividly the characters came across.
>>
>Oops, sorry - I realized on rereading your post that you were talking about
>_Alphabet_ - that makes me eager to read it! I did, however, find some
>Riddlemaster echoes in Serre - maybe it was the forest and the dogged,
>practical woman who reminded me a bit of Raederle.


Now that you mention it, yes, she does. The way she goes after the
prince and why she does are similar.

I'm quite fond of the witch in that book.

I want to talk about ALPHABET, but won't yet, as you haven't read it.

>
>> Now I recently reread TOWER IN STONY WOOD, and the back of my mind
>> kept (and still is) insisting that it's a redo of her *very* early
>> THROME OF THE ERRIL OF SHERRIL. Although aside from the structure
>> being a knight on a quest in both, I'm having trouble seeing why. And
>> what the knight finds and accomplishes not being what he thinks he's
>> supposed to find and accomplish.....shrug
>>
>Yes - you know what, I had the same reaction! And I don't really know what
>set it off either, except as you say the knight riding round and round and
>not really getting anywhere...
>

Then if I'm crazy to think so, we're crazy together. :-).

He does accomplish quite a lot, just not what he thought he was
supposed to be doing. He's grown on me. When it first came out, the
whole book simply refused to stick - I couldn't remember a thing about
it. Now it's finally taken root, and the characters have come to
life.

--
Elaine Thompson <Ela...@KEThompson.org>

Stephen Kane

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Feb 23, 2004, 3:32:12 PM2/23/04
to
Debbie Gascoyne wrote:

> Stephen Kane wrote:

>> The Book of Atrix Wolfe by Patricia McKillip - I loved this, especially the
>> fabulously rich prose describing the veritable orgy of food created in the
>> castle kitchens. Thanks again, Debbie, for the recommendation!

> You're very welcome! Glad you enjoyed it :) Now you have to read _In the
> Forest of Serre_, which I've just read - her best in a while, I think.

Yep, LOTS more McKillip out there, just gotta find the time!

>> The Ogre Downstairs by Diana Wynne Jones - hadn't read this since I was about
>> ten years old and it was still almost as good! One small quibble - surely
>> Douglas and Malcolm at least would have studied Latin at school and therefore
>> spotted the clues in the names of the magical ingredients?

> I loved that! As a lapsed Classicist, I also got a huge kick out of the Greek
> that the dragon teeth guys speak - they say things like "Lemme at 'im" and it
> looks like genuine Greek.

I only spotted that recently! As a child I thought it WAS Greek.

>> Shards of Honour by Lois McMaster Bujold - NOT for children and only on topic
>> because it was recommended to me in this group many moons ago. Thought it was
>> brilliant and will definitely have to read the rest now - as before, thanks
>> Debbie!

> Again, you're welcome :) Have you read _The Curse of Chalion_ yet???

Nope, another for the list I guess!

Thanks,

Stephen.

Stephen Kane

unread,
Feb 23, 2004, 3:37:19 PM2/23/04
to
Elaine Thompson wrote:

> Debbie Gascoyne wrote:

>> Stephen Kane wrote:

>>> The Book of Atrix Wolfe by Patricia McKillip - I loved this, especially the
>>> fabulously rich prose describing the veritable orgy of food created in the
>>> castle kitchens. Thanks again, Debbie, for the recommendation!

>> You're very welcome! Glad you enjoyed it :) Now you have to read _In the
>> Forest of Serre_, which I've just read - her best in a while, I think.

> I preferred _Ombria_ to _Serre_ the characters came across more vividly to
> me. And just finished _Alphabet of Thorns_ which was (of course) excellent,
> but needs a bit of time to settle and a reread, I think. I think there were
> lots of subtle links between sections I didn't quite catch. But on the first
> reading I also got several _Riddlemaster_ echoes.
>
> Are these later McKillips considered children's books?

Dunno about children's but Atrix Wolfe and Winter Rose are to be found on
the young adult shelves anyplace I've looked.

>>> The Ogre Downstairs by Diana Wynne Jones - hadn't read this since I was
>>> about ten years old and it was still almost as good! One small quibble -
>>> surely Douglas and Malcolm at least would have studied Latin at school and
>>> therefore spotted the clues in the names of the magical ingredients?

>> I loved that! As a lapsed Classicist, I also got a huge kick out of the
>> Greek that the dragon teeth guys speak - they say things like "Lemme at 'im"
>> and it looks like genuine Greek.

> Wonderful what a different alphabet lets a writer get away with, isn't it? I
> enjoyed it too, as I was studying Greek when I finally got hold of a copy of
> the book.

>>> Shards of Honour by Lois McMaster Bujold - NOT for children and only on
>>> topic because it was recommended to me in this group many moons ago. Thought
>>> it was brilliant and will definitely have to read the rest now - as before,
>>> thanks Debbie!

>> Again, you're welcome :) Have you read _The Curse of Chalion_ yet???

> And the companion _Paladin of Souls_.

Must try them.

Thanks,

Stephen.

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