Asheford Institute of Antiques

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leila d

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May 29, 2011, 3:16:41 PM5/29/11
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I'm looking for some sort of review of the Asheford Institute of
Antiques. I have not been able to find much in terms of unbiased
reviews and would love to hear from someone who completed the course.
Thanks,
Leila

David Archer

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Jun 23, 2011, 4:00:29 PM6/23/11
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Hi Leila -

I took the program about 4 years ago. I'm in the import and export end
of the business (I buy internationally and also sell internationally).
I travel a lot in Europe and also work as a licensed appraiser. I've
been in the business for about 25 years, but wanted something that
would allow me to appraise internationally as I traveled, with some
credentials to back-up my experience. I did a hefty amount of research
on a number of options for achieving this, from ISA (International
Society Of Appraisers) to ASA and Asheford. They all looked pretty
good, but my decision eventually weighted towards Asheford simply
because of the depth of their program. It's very detailed, and covers
actual antique items, history and styles, as well as appraising theory
- they were the only ones to offer all of this, and I think that made
a big impact on my decision. Plus, I'd met a Swiss gentleman, who was
a graduate of the school, and worked as an Asheford appraiser in
Europe, which helped in my decision making process as well. I found
the Course itself to be quite comprehensive, and the instructors and
staff knowledgeable and pretty helpful. I don't know if I'd say it's
for everyone - especially if you're just looking for something lite,
and aren't wanting something that's going to require a fair bit of
time and effort to complete. But if you are, then I'd say it's a good
choice. Hope this helps.

Dave

nancym...@gmail.com

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Aug 1, 2013, 2:58:15 PM8/1/13
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I too am thinking of signing up with Asheford. I work full time and would like to know realistically how much time is required daily. Thanks for any input. Also feel free to share pros and cons of your personal experience.
Thanks,
Nancy

forsal...@gmail.com

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Apr 11, 2015, 12:26:34 PM4/11/15
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I've been in or have been around the antique business for most of my life. My parents collected, and now my father owns a large shop in the French Quarter in New Orleans. I am an antique dealer my self in New Orleans. I work about 50 hours a week and was able to complete the schooling through Asheford in about 6 months. Mind you, I was only able to devote about 4 hours a week to it. I found it very in depth and informative (both the course material about the antiques them selves and the appraisal methodology and morals). I will now be offering Antique Appraisal in addition to being a dealer. I would recommend it to anyone, regardless of how long they have been in the business.

Christian

nvac...@gmail.com

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Apr 14, 2015, 9:24:50 PM4/14/15
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I have taken the course and also looked for reviews before making the investment. I did quite a bit of research and was not able to come up with much, which after taking the course I was quite surprised. Here is my unbiased review.

I ordered the course and received the materials in about four or five days. I was exited to begin exploring the material and learning. However, my first experience was that they had put another students appraisal card in my kit. This could have been an honest mistake, but after paying for the course in full instead of installment plans at close to $1000, this did not leave me with a good feeling.

Inspecting the kit I found the material for the course was not intended to present itself very professionally and worth the money paid. The books were all what appeared to be simply bound pages run off on a copier. I dismissed this again only thinking who cares what the material look like. There must be a wealth of information that will help me in my business.

I took a few days to review some of the books. I believe you get five days to send it back for a full refund. I skimmed through most of the books and was not overly impressed. Again, I though I would give it a try and the five days to return the material for a refund expired.

The series of books mostly contain a profit book and a pleasure book. The profit goes into the business side of things while the pleasure deals with antiques themselves.

I completed the first set of books and did not feel there was much useful information. The profit section was mostly common sense material for anyone that has taken a general business course or high school equivalent. The pleasure section mostly focused on furniture, history, and the restoration of furniture. I passed this all off again and thought it only had to get better.

Finishing the series of books I found it did not get any better. At best close to 3/4 of the pleasure books focused on the history of furniture, the restoration of furniture, and identifying furniture. In addition, there were many grammar errors in the books and I even found one to have duplicate pages.

Another book focused on the travel of either the founder or an instructor with the course and it did not focus on antiques at all. This almost seemed as though it was used as a fill for the book to make it seem to have more information.

The conclusion is do not waste the time or money on the Ashford Institute of Antiques course. The course is outdated, poorly put together, and will not add any value for the money spent. It is a money maker for the people running the course and this is intrinsically reminded at the end of each book as the author reminds the reader to send in a payment if they are on a payment plan for the course. There may be two or three hundred dollars worth of material with the price guide in the course. The remaining balance is profit for Ashford. This may explain why they are able to write about their European travels so extensively.

You can get the same education by reading some antique, restoration, and business books from the library and paying a few dollars in late fines.

hatcher...@gmail.com

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Jun 20, 2015, 8:28:44 PM6/20/15
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I couldn't disagree more...

I'm 61 and have been in the antiques trade for almost forty years, of which, I spent ten years working for a leading auction house in New York, and for the last twenty years, with my partner in New England, where we operate a large auction house and antiques business. I ended up taking the Asheford program because even though I've had a lifetimes worth of experience buying and selling antiques, I wanted to gain my appraisal certification (which now apparently seems to be the required norm for dealers). I certainly wasn't looking to take their course to learn about antiques.

When I first started in, I was really just expecting to breeze through most of the sections on furniture, periods, styles, history etc., but actually found much of the material to be somewhat of an eye-opener. Some information that I had picked up over the years on my own, and had assumed to be correct, I found wasn't. Not that everything was a revelation, but there were plenty of new facts and descriptions that left me realizing that my knowledge base wasn't quite as complete as I might have once thought. Learning about porcelain again, and other smalls and collectibles, was an example of where I think the course was actually very good.

One of the previous posts mentions the profit portions of the course as being common-sense... I couldn't agree more with that statement. With each successive section, the information on running an antiques business seemed to become more detailed and pragmatic as you went along - I could simply tell from the writing that this was someone who had actually operated an antiques business, and knew what was required in order to make it work. Trust me, I've been working with antiques for a long time, and have seen people come and go, and the information laid out on most of the pages seemed like decent advice to me. As someone who travels to Europe to buy fairly regularly, I found much of that information was applicable too. Did the writer go off on a bit of tangent at times? Perhaps, but most of what he said about purchasing antiques abroad I can attest to as being true. His information seemed not only accurate, but relevant as well.

I guess for me, it just seems to make sense that the course would start at the beginning with topics like periods, and styles and progress from there. Even after forty years in the business, I'd concede that I'm certainly not an expert in every field, but I'm no slouch either. What surprised me the most was that I went into this looking to get my appraisal certification, but feel that I came out with quite a bit more. The content was wide-ranging, and from my perspective, covered a lot of ground. Sure, there were some topics that I would've liked to have seen discussed in more detail, but that's probably just due to my personal preference for certain subject matters. They obviously couldn't write about every antique and collectible ever made, but what they did pack into their program seemed to have a good continuity to it, and it made sense.

I suppose if I was just starting out in the antiques business all over again, I could go to the library, just as I did forty years ago, but one could also do that when learning about fine arts, medicine, engineering, or virtually any other profession. But most people don't - they usually just take a course of study.

Obviously, I can only speak for myself in this regard, but for me, I found the Asheford program to not only be a good means for updating my appraisal credentials, but also a well conceived program in general (just wish it was online). However, I can assure you that if I had to go back in time and do it all again... I wouldn't be starting at the library!

aucti...@gmail.com

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Jun 22, 2015, 10:52:24 AM6/22/15
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I enrolled in the Asheford study modules a couple years back, and got the text books. I'm an auctioneer, so for me I wanted the program so I could grow my knowledge on antiques and collectibles, and be able to do some appraising on the side.

I found the course covered a lot of stuff, maybe too much for me at the time, because I was hoping to cram it all into about 2 months worth of studying, before auction season began. But now that I'm all done, I'm glad I stuck with it and finished, but it took me the better part of a year. I'd say it's been a lot of help in learning to identify items we're putting up for auction, especially box-lots with old silver and smaller goods, and just old knickknacks in general. One thing I really liked about the course that I wasn't expecting, was learning about paintings. We get lots of old oils and watercolors, and before I never used to pay them much attention, but now we've had a few go for some good prices, so just that alone has made it worthwhile for me.

I also think having some kind of format to learning made it easier to understand than just having a bunch of different reference books, which I already have, but could never get to finishing. I'm in the business of selling old stuff, so for me a course on antiques and appraising made sense, if you are just wanting something for weekend garage saleing then this might be too much. Otherwise, I'd say it's a really good program if your serious about getting into the antiques and appraising business.

I noticed someone mentioned about wanting the course online. I would like to have taken it that way too (no waiting for the text books to arrive), but I think you maybe can do that now, because my sister in Australia just signed up, and said the course she was taking was a new online version, but wasn't sure if it was just for international students, not for folks in the USA yet. Don't know if that's right or not, but maybe worth checking out if that's how you're wanting to take it.

joelfis...@gmail.com

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Jun 22, 2015, 12:15:27 PM6/22/15
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Just read this as a Google Groups subscriber, and had to laugh. I mean really....the individual who wrote earlier about having to spend "close to a thousand-bucks" on a recognized program that's well over sixteen-hundred pages long - and they're worried about value for money??? Not sure what century they're living in, because I've taken both the Asheford program and courses from appraisal societies, and I can tell you hands down that not only was the Asheford course a lot better, but it was a third of the price when all was said and done. Perhaps a little more research might be in order???
- Joel
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julia....@gmail.com

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Jun 23, 2015, 11:55:37 PM6/23/15
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Hi - I'm also interested in taking the "new" online Asheford Course/Program, if it's being offered???

Does anyone know whether you can take it here in the US now, or is it still only for overseas students?

Thanks
Message has been deleted

leslieh...@gmail.com

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Jun 24, 2015, 11:20:58 AM6/24/15
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Hi Julia! Not sure this will help, as I'm from England, but I enrolled in the beta-test version for their "new" online e-Course just this past January. During my original enquiry, I was told by the Registrar's Office that the new e-Course was only being "tested" in Europe at that time, and a final version wouldn't be released in America until later in the year. I'm not sure if this is still the case, but I would think so, since the last correspondence I received from the school's development office indicated that "all final updates" had been implemented into my e-Course, and that I was no longer using the beta version. I can only surmise from this that they're done testing, however, you might want to call them directly just to make sure it's in America now. Best, Leslie

julia....@gmail.com

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Jun 25, 2015, 10:58:24 AM6/25/15
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Thanks for writing Leslie, I'll definitely give them a call and see! How are you liking the e-Course?

leslieh...@gmail.com

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Jun 26, 2015, 10:16:44 PM6/26/15
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Hi! Well, to be honest,it's actually much more than I anticipated. I'm about halfway through and I'm really enjoying it thus far. I looked at the textbooks of a friend who was taking the program last year while I was on holiday in the States, and would have gladly taken those, but the shipping to the UK on an installment plan was exorbitant, so I just left it, until I received an email from the school with the offer of testing their beta e-Course. I work in insurance designing bespoke policies for fine art professionals and valuers, so for me the program was really about adding to my credentials. I've taken a couple of online classes in the past, but this is much, much, more in-depth than anything I've done before. The course text books I saw in the States seemed very thorough, but the online class just seems to have so much more information with all the videos, links and photos. I'm not sure how much larger it is in volume or content, but I would think it to be substantial when compared to the books. If you're in the industry, and wanting thorough training, then I think this program would be great, but I'm devoting a fair chunk of time to it, and still likely won't be finished before the end of the year. As to whether or not to take the online version as opposed to the textbooks, I'd certainly opt for the e-Course(P.S. I'd be happy to let you know how things progress, just PM me privately, and I'll respond) Best, L.

durellsh...@gmail.com

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Jul 3, 2015, 9:28:37 AM7/3/15
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Just completed my first test - can't believe how much I've learned already!
All my materials arrived on time so no complaints whatsoever. :-)
Took the textbooks and they're super. Loving this school. Would very much recommend to anyone.

printed...@gmail.com

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Jul 15, 2015, 11:17:06 AM7/15/15
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I started the course from Asheford about 2 months ago, when I retired from the printing business, but have collected antiques most of my life. I'm not a prolific poster of reviews by any means, but came across this page when looking for information on their course, and it helped me to decide, so I thought I'd share my thoughts too.
I probably can't speak with any authority as to what's in the books, since I'm finding so much of it new to me, even at my age! But, as someone who's been in the printing business for over thirty years I can speak to the quality of their printed matter, and I'd say the course books are first rate. The images and text are crisp and clear, and the bindings make it easy to roll the pages back for notes and highlighting, which for my generation, is a must! I may be old school, but I just like reading with something in my hand that isn't lit up like a Christmas tree. I haven't seen the Internet course so I can't comment, but if it's as well done as their book version you probably won't go wrong.
I also like how the subjects and topics are all connected. It's not like you start out with something in the middle and have to try and figure out how to connect the dots, it's all explained really well right from the beginning. This is why I like the books so much - flipping pages back and forth makes this easy.
I'd agree with the other reviewer about how much information there is to absorb, it's a lot, so not for the feint of heart! But I took the course hoping to start a second career in my retirement, and so far I've been impressed, particularly with the profit Plans, which I've already put to use for some buying. I'm only about half way thru the second set of books, but so far I can't complain. I'm learning something new, and did well on my first exam, so I'd have to say that overall I'm pretty pleased with the school.

shawnwi...@gmail.com

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Jul 30, 2015, 9:59:26 PM7/30/15
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I found Asheford online through a friends
referral, and did some research myself on
this program. And, while a lot of the
"personal" reviews were helpful, what made
the difference for me was actually looking
up the folks who were graduates of the school.
I guess anyone can say anything about a course
they're taking, and have an opinion on it,
but seeing what they did with it afterwards
is what swayed me towards this program. Mainly,
I was surprised (and admittedly impressed), by
the fact that a number of the major antique
trade magazines and papers use Asheford
graduates as "expert appraisers" for columns in
their publications. I wouldn't imagine
newspapers like Antique Trader, and The Journal
of Antiques & Collectibles hiring people from
Asheford unless they had some sort of confidence
in their ability and expertise - which to me,
spoke volumes. (below is the link I found when
originally searching for info on their program:
http://www.antiquetrader.com/featured/antiques
-appraisal-gives-side-chair-value-300-500).

In the end, I found that reading people's general
reviews was a good starting point, but seeing the
results of what people did once they completed
the course was far more of a testimonial to me
when it came time to making a decision about their
program. I've been enrolled in the ecourse platform
of the course for about two months now and would
say it's excellent, both in content and presentation.
And, while I think review pages like this can be
helpful if you're interested in taking a program such
as Ashefords, I'd also try and go beyond the general
milieu of reviews, and instead see what
"professionals" in the business have to say about
them. It certainly helped me to decide...

ortiz...@gmail.com

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Aug 17, 2015, 3:12:00 PM8/17/15
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On Sunday, May 29, 2011 at 2:16:41 PM UTC-5, leila d wrote:
As a museum curator, and Art-History prof in PA., I've been offering the Asheford course for the past two-years as an adjunct for my post-grad students who've expressed an interest in the decorative arts field.

This program is exceedingly well laid out, in terms of content and general construction. The curriculum is intuitive, with a logical progression of thematic design events and reveals that showcase the movement and development of antique styles and decorative features throughout the centuries. If I could teach just "one" class, this would be it! The program offered by the people at Asheford is a first-rate offering in my opinion.
--
Sent from my Android phone with Snipit Mail.

tellyso...@gmail.com

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Jan 7, 2016, 10:10:07 AM1/7/16
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This original post is obviously quite old and I'm not sure if it's still relevant, but if you are looking for "International" accreditation in the field of appraising for antiques, collectibles and memorabilia, then the "certification" process offered by the Asheford Institute is probably going to be the best way to go.

The Asheford school is not only recognized in America, but throughout Europe and Asia as well. Our auction house is located in Hong Kong, and we've used and hired valuers from the Asheford Institute for over 30 years, with very good results.

In my experience working with professional appraisers and insurance companies, I would say that the program from Asheford is likely to take you a lot farther than any other if your aim is to become an appraiser in the field of antiques.
Message has been deleted

billlow...@gmail.com

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Mar 23, 2016, 12:55:58 PM3/23/16
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On Sunday, May 29, 2011 at 3:16:41 PM UTC-4, leila d wrote:
If they've been around for 50 years, they must be doing
something right!

http://www.asheford.com/asheford-news-ticker-headlines

Just say'in...

---

_sent from my Samsung Super-Droid*
Message has been deleted

rosedog...@gmail.com

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Jun 16, 2016, 8:00:53 AM6/16/16
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On Sunday, May 29, 2011 at 3:16:41 PM UTC-4, leila d wrote:
Asheford works with the Young Guns (YG) antiques program from England to promote younger people entering into the antiques field. I'm a member, and was able to take their Course through this organization.

My experience with them was stellar. They seem to have a knack for knowing how to put good learning materials together that make sense, and that have a practical application. There's also quite few other members from YG's who've taken the Asheford Course, and it's from their recommendations that I decided to enrol in the program myself. It's been a boon to me as far as learning the ropes of this trade and profession go. I would most definitely give it high praise, as my business model would be nowhere near where it is today without them.

luizzi...@gmail.com

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Jul 15, 2016, 2:45:02 PM7/15/16
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nakee...@gmail.com

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Oct 4, 2016, 9:38:47 AM10/4/16
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On Sunday, May 29, 2011 at 3:16:41 PM UTC-4, leila d wrote:
I like this COurse very much. My business in Dubai and Montreal. Asheford people good to help me with language and time difference when studying. My sales are very good. Thank you.

tildaw...@gmail.com

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Feb 21, 2017, 4:02:27 PM2/21/17
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On Sunday, May 29, 2011 at 2:16:41 PM UTC-5, leila d wrote:
I was a bit skeptical at first doing an online course, but I just finished the school's new eCourse last month, and must say that I truly enjoyed the whole experience.

I had assumed the course of study would be a work-process, over which I could complete in less than three months. To my surprise the quality and depth of the online materials and information was much more challenging than I had expected. I have learned professional details in appraisal studies that have significantly improved my competence and confidence in regard to my appraisal practice. I had set out to pass the examinations with Distinction - but instead ended up with Honors - a nod to the great (and patient) instructors at the school :-)

As a side note, I originally went with textbooks, but they let me preview the e-Course with my first plan of study, and I quickly changed over to the online format. No comparison in my opinion. This has been a great Course, and has added to my professional portfolio of qualifications tremendously.

jhfl...@gmail.com

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May 24, 2017, 10:41:00 AM5/24/17
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On Sunday, May 29, 2011 at 3:16:41 PM UTC-4, leila d wrote:
> I'm looking for some sort of review of the Asheford Institute of
> Antiques. I have not been able to find much in terms of unbiased
> reviews and would love to hear from someone who completed the course.
> Thanks,
> Leila

In terms of the quality of a program, I think you'd be hard pressed to find anything as good as what Asheford offers, period. You get out of it what you put into it. I signed up for the online Course and have been able to engage in some really good discussions with the school's Instructor's regarding where I want to take my antiques and decorative arts business. I live in Florida so there's ample opportunities for me regardless of which direction I pursue, but I also put in lots of study hours - and for me - I think it's really paid off.

I'm running long here, but what I will say is that Asheford seems to tick all of the boxes for me: cost, flexibility, and quality. So far it's been a very positive experience for me. I'm looking forward to graduating and completing my studies this year.

shawnadi...@gmail.com

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Sep 29, 2017, 7:38:25 PM9/29/17
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On Sunday, May 29, 2011 at 3:16:41 PM UTC-4, leila d wrote:
> I'm looking for some sort of review of the Asheford Institute of
> Antiques. I have not been able to find much in terms of unbiased
> reviews and would love to hear from someone who completed the course.
> Thanks,
> Leila


Completed my e-Course studies about three weeks ago. Would agree with almost all of the reviewers here. A very thorough program for professionals - and those wanting to be. I think the biggest surprise I found was how in-depth the Course was - it's definitely not a walk in the park - you'll need to put in the time, but it's worth it in the end. I'm very happy with my decision to earn my appraisal certification through the Asheford team.

horga...@gmail.com

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Oct 26, 2017, 11:07:10 PM10/26/17
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On Sunday, 29 May 2011 15:16:41 UTC-4, leila d wrote:
> I'm looking for some sort of review of the Asheford Institute of
> Antiques. I have not been able to find much in terms of unbiased
> reviews and would love to hear from someone who completed the course.
> Thanks,
> Leila

I'm nearing the final round in my course with Asheford's online study program. I've been very happy. I can't believe how much I've learned so far. It really guides you through some critical areas of study and gives you a strong groundwork for future development and business. I thought I knew a lot - I really didn't ;) If you follow the program and watch the videos and do the extra work and research and reading, you'll know more than you expected to about antiques, history, and the industry. There's a reason Asheford has been a leader in antique and appraisal education for so long! Good luck!

barry....@ebth.com

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Dec 28, 2017, 3:08:08 PM12/28/17
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I just started and am finishing up Phase 1. What style are the tests? Multiple choice or essay? I think I'm ready, but not sure how the process works.

annashe...@gmail.com

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Dec 30, 2017, 5:09:46 PM12/30/17
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On Sunday, May 29, 2011 at 2:16:41 PM UTC-5, leila d wrote:
> I'm looking for some sort of review of the Asheford Institute of
> Antiques. I have not been able to find much in terms of unbiased
> reviews and would love to hear from someone who completed the course.
> Thanks,
> Leila

While I could simply add my two-cents to the growing chorus of folks exclaiming their love for this program, the truth of the matter is... it's probably well deserved. I'm a picky, if not downright PITA kinda person when it comes to most things in life, but I will give credit where it's due, and it's definitely due for Asheford. I studied every review with a fine-tooth-comb before I even contemplated enrolling, and have to say that without a doubt, the high praise for this program is justified. People said the course materials and staff were excellent, and they were. I read that instructors were helpful and actually worked with students one-on-one, and they did. People seemed to profess a love for the simplicity of the online layout and how easy it was to use, and it was.I kept looking for a crack and waiting for the other shoe to drop, but it never did. Taking this Course just simply ended up being one of the best professional decisions I've made in a long time. I absolutely loved it! (So there, my two-cents and a bit more!)

henderse...@gmail.com

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Sep 20, 2018, 1:51:31 PM9/20/18
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On Sunday, May 29, 2011 at 3:16:41 PM UTC-4, leila d wrote:
> I'm looking for some sort of review of the Asheford Institute of
> Antiques. I have not been able to find much in terms of unbiased
> reviews and would love to hear from someone who completed the course.
> Thanks,
> Leila

Hi Leila!
I think you will be very pleased with this program. It took me a while to finish, but it was so very worth it. I was selling on Etsy, and saw someone on there had been certified by the school as a decorative arts appraiser, which got me to thinking, and which eventually led me to enroll. The e-Course is super easy to use with no downloads or anything like that, which made a big difference to me since I'm not really a huge techie person. The instructors were also very helpful throughout my studies, and in truth, are probably a good part of why I stuck with it - they literally helped me every step of the way. I can't really say enough good stuff about this Course, it was worth every dime to me, and that appraisal certification which is now posted on my Etsy store, has made a big difference in my sales too. I don't think you could go wrong here if you're really looking to learn about the world of antiques and appraising, it's just that good.

Ailsa McMenemy

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Jan 2, 2019, 10:00:04 AM1/2/19
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On Sunday, May 29, 2011 at 3:16:41 PM UTC-4, leila d wrote:
> I'm looking for some sort of review of the Asheford Institute of
> Antiques. I have not been able to find much in terms of unbiased
> reviews and would love to hear from someone who completed the course.
> Thanks,
> Leila

I am interested in this program although after reading all the reviews I am a little hesitant. I am a novice having never worked in the business. I only know what I know from being around the antiques that my parents and grandparents collected. They were quite knowledgable. I am very interested in the antiques world and all that it entails. I would like to get into the business but I worry that because I have no experience I won't get very far. I would like to have some accreditation behind me to show that I am serious. As a novice will I be able to complete this course?

pamc...@gmail.com

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Jan 10, 2019, 10:17:09 AM1/10/19
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Hi Ailsa!
I'm just finishing up the Asheford coursework now, and was wondering the same thing when I enrolled a couple years ago. I didn't have a lot of experience myself - mainly just self-taught from garage sales, auctions, and hanging with friends who were collectors - but this program launched me into a whole new level of understanding. I was kind of intimidated too at first because it seemed like it might be out of my league, or just for professionals or people already in the industry; but it wasn't, the program started right at the very beginning for novice's like myself, and got into more detail as it progressed. I also found the instructors and staff to be super friendly and helpful - this was especially great in the beginning when I had sooo many questions. I wouldn't be concerned at all about completing this course (at least from my perspective), I found it to be really user-friendly and designed to help even newbies like myself make it through. It was a good choice for me professionally, and I'm happy I did it. Best of Luck... Pam C.

antiqu...@gmail.com

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Sep 2, 2019, 5:21:18 PM9/2/19
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On Sunday, May 29, 2011 at 3:16:41 PM UTC-4, leila d wrote:
> I'm looking for some sort of review of the Asheford Institute of
> Antiques. I have not been able to find much in terms of unbiased
> reviews and would love to hear from someone who completed the course.
> Thanks,
> Leila

Such a good program. I have been in this business for over forty years and cannot believe how much I learned from this Course. From simple basic nuances in style and form to all the mid-century designers and beyond. It's not just particular pieces and items you learn about, but the connected history as well, which really puts it in perspective and context. I could go on and on, but there are so many great reviews here which probably say it a lot better than me, so I'll just end with a very high recommendation for the Asheford Course and the people running this program.

henderse...@gmail.com

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Apr 22, 2020, 10:55:16 AM4/22/20
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On Sunday, May 29, 2011 at 3:16:41 PM UTC-4, leila d wrote:
> I'm looking for some sort of review of the Asheford Institute of
> Antiques. I have not been able to find much in terms of unbiased
> reviews and would love to hear from someone who completed the course.
> Thanks,
> Leila

I realize that this forum is probably no longer replying directly to the original poster, but it still seems to be a good place to get info and relate info on Asheford. So, I just wanted to throw in a few thoughts as I've been taking this program since January. I figured that with all the Covid 19 stuff happening my studies would probably get put on hold like most other things, but nope, these guys just keep on rolling. My exams continue to get graded, my e-Course modules appear in my inbox when they're supposed to, and when I phone they're actually there! I absolutely love my studies, but the fact that these people haven't missed a beat in all this craziness is just unreal. You guys rock Asheford!!!

sarah...@gmail.com

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Aug 12, 2020, 3:45:29 AM8/12/20
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Thank you for sharing your experience during COVID. I’ve been hesitant to start the online course because I worried about shutdown disruptions.

liz drexler

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Oct 4, 2020, 2:10:44 PM10/4/20
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I just finished my studies with Asheford and had absolutely zero problems of any kind during Covid. The times they're supposed to respond within, they did, and my online lessons were graded when they said, so no issues on that front. Overall, I found this to be a very pleasing course of study. I have been working at home during the pandemic and was able to devote a considerable amount of time to my studies. Because of this I was able to really drill down into their curriculum, and must say that I was impressed. I'm a part-time museum curator, and I found this to be well over and above what I was expecting. Should you be considering a vocation in the decorative arts, then this program will serve you well. I was referred to Asheford from a friend who does appraisals for the MET, and look forward to adding this credential to my resumé. Thanks.

Bill Lowenstien

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Feb 6, 2021, 2:26:24 PMFeb 6
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I looked at this program for years, almost enrolled back in 2010, but waited till the online version came out, and just got my diploma from completing their e-Course last week. What I can tell you is that these folks really do know their stuff. I many not be a techie guy, but I do know about the decorative arts and antiques, or so I thought. There is so much detailed information crammed into this Course, that you'd be hard pressed not to be an expert by the time you finished. It simply puts all areas of antiques, collectibles, vintage and every other genre into spaces where they belong, so that you can learn about them independently, but also understand how they're connected within the overall framework of the decorative arts as well. I was very impressed with the Course and the people running it. No hesitation to recommend this to anyone.

Joseph Varner

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Apr 7, 2021, 12:31:08 AMApr 7
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Has anyone completed the appraisal course through AI? I am having trouble understanding what exactly you get or can be apart of after completion. Example: AI says the USPAP is National Test, but to be apart of ASA you must specialize in Personal Property.

So is the AI Appraiser course a USPAP with a Personal Property credential or simply just the standard USPAP and I'll have to go get the PP credential after?

Hope this makes sense haha. I'm obviously wanting to use my AI appraisal cert with any other organizations that I can.

Thank You

Terrance Waltree

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Apr 30, 2021, 3:14:09 PMApr 30
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On Sunday, May 29, 2011 at 3:16:41 PM UTC-4, leila d wrote:
> I'm looking for some sort of review of the Asheford Institute of
> Antiques. I have not been able to find much in terms of unbiased
> reviews and would love to hear from someone who completed the course.
> Thanks,
> Leila

I found the Course to be challenging, and very comprehensive in it's scope. I had read a great deal about the program before enrolling, so I was fairly well informed about the curriculum when first starting my studies. I will say though, much to my astonishment, that after almost thirty-five years in the business, I was pleasantly surprised by just how deep of a dive this program went into various subject matters. I never had a stitch of trouble when it came to accessing the e-Course, and I also really enjoyed the engagement with my instructors and the staff. I think anyone who has a keen interest in this area of the decorative arts would be well served by this program, though it may be a bit much for those with just a casual interest. In conclusion, I would say that I was extremely satisfied with my experience at the school.

edwi...@gmail.com

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May 19, 2021, 5:45:15 PMMay 19
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On Sunday, May 29, 2011 at 3:16:41 PM UTC-4, leila d wrote:
> I'm looking for some sort of review of the Asheford Institute of
> Antiques. I have not been able to find much in terms of unbiased
> reviews and would love to hear from someone who completed the course.
> Thanks,
> Leila
Hi Leila,
Just saw your note.
I graduated from the program in 2020.
I had the same experience as you before I took the leap. Very little in the way of third party unbiased info. In the end it was worth the leap. My continuing regret is that there is no alumni affinity group where we can help each other out after graduation. What targeted questions do you have? If I can address them I will.
Ed Willins
MinutemanAnti...@gmail.com (startup consultancy in Lexington, MA)

Toby Dillon

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May 20, 2021, 7:49:44 PMMay 20
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On Sunday, May 29, 2011 at 3:16:41 PM UTC-4, leila d wrote:
> I'm looking for some sort of review of the Asheford Institute of
> Antiques. I have not been able to find much in terms of unbiased
> reviews and would love to hear from someone who completed the course.
> Thanks,
> Leila

Hi! Not sure how much help I can provide, or if you're still looking into this, but I graduated from the program this past March, and really found it to be a great exercise in academia and practicality. I've been retailing for many years from a shop in San Francisco near Union Square, and was looking to downsize my storefront (age and bad backs tend not to mix), so wanted to get my appraisal certification to supplement my bricks-and-click business. I did some fairly heavy research, BBB, this forum, and a few others before deciding, but in the end was very happy with the final results. I would have to say, like others have commented, that it's a very rigorous course of study that does require some time to complete. I think for those who are really wanting to make a life-change regarding a new vocation or getting into appraising, then this is a great place to be. It took me about eight months to complete, but I really enjoyed my studies, and the school in general. If it's still something you're considering, I wouldn't hesitate to give it props for anyone looking to get into this field of study. A+
T. Dillon
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