L Marcus Ltd furniture

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Shari

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Aug 29, 2007, 9:10:30 PM8/29/07
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I've just purchased a beautiful piece and was hoping to see what other
matching pieces existed. When I searched all of Google, I could find
nothing on the manufacturer, or anyone selling any pieces by this
manufacturer.

Has anyone heard of L. Marcus Ltd. in London, England, who created
furniture circa 1949?

I purchased a dining room piece, and would love to know what other
things they created and what those pieces look like.

I don't know if it's good or bad that on all the internet I could find
no mention of this manufacturer or pieces for sale made by them.

Any thoughts?

--
Windows and Macintosh shareware games
Blackjack game
http://www.gypsyware.com

Kris Baker

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Aug 29, 2007, 9:54:32 PM8/29/07
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"Shari" <sh...@gypsyware.com> wrote in message
news:shari-F679DA....@news.comcast.net...

> I've just purchased a beautiful piece and was hoping to see what other
> matching pieces existed. When I searched all of Google, I could find
> nothing on the manufacturer, or anyone selling any pieces by this
> manufacturer.
>
> Has anyone heard of L. Marcus Ltd. in London, England, who created
> furniture circa 1949?
>
> I purchased a dining room piece, and would love to know what other
> things they created and what those pieces look like.
>
> I don't know if it's good or bad that on all the internet I could find
> no mention of this manufacturer or pieces for sale made by them.
>
> Any thoughts?

Are you sure that's not the name of the retailer?


Shari

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Aug 30, 2007, 2:37:37 AM8/30/07
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In article <espBi.322$7P7...@newssvr19.news.prodigy.net>,
"Kris Baker" <kris....@prodigyyy.net> wrote:

> Are you sure that's not the name of the retailer?

On the back of the piece it says:

L. Marcus Ltd.
makers of
fine furniture since
1898
Telephone: Clissold 1574
Beatty Works, London, N.16


(Kris, if this came to you my apologies. Sometimes I forget which
programs use Cmd-R for reply versus Cmd-Shift-R.)

Shari

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Aug 30, 2007, 4:06:58 AM8/30/07
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In article <shari-D498D9....@news.comcast.net>,
Shari <sh...@gypsyware.com> wrote:

> In article <espBi.322$7P7...@newssvr19.news.prodigy.net>,
> "Kris Baker" <kris....@prodigyyy.net> wrote:
>
> > Are you sure that's not the name of the retailer?
>
> On the back of the piece it says:
>
> L. Marcus Ltd.
> makers of
> fine furniture since
> 1898
> Telephone: Clissold 1574
> Beatty Works, London, N.16
>
>

After exhaustive research, I found one other piece by L. Marcus Ltd.,
and according to the ad, they'd gotten it from mother/grandmother and
claimed it was a reproduction piece. So I'm wondering if L. Marcus Ltd.
were manufacturers of reproduction pieces?

Which leads to the bigger question: What is it a reproduction of?

I've searched hundreds of antiques online hoping to find this piece
somewhere else where perhaps I could get more info on it. Haven't found
this, or any items that might have matched it.

Simon

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Aug 30, 2007, 9:44:47 AM8/30/07
to
Shari wrote:
>
>> On the back of the piece it says:
>>
>> L. Marcus Ltd.
>> makers of
>> fine furniture since
>> 1898
>> Telephone: Clissold 1574
>> Beatty Works, London, N.16
>>
>>
>
> After exhaustive research, I found one other piece by L. Marcus Ltd.,
> and according to the ad, they'd gotten it from mother/grandmother and
> claimed it was a reproduction piece. So I'm wondering if L. Marcus Ltd.
> were manufacturers of reproduction pieces?
>
> Which leads to the bigger question: What is it a reproduction of?
>
> I've searched hundreds of antiques online hoping to find this piece
> somewhere else where perhaps I could get more info on it. Haven't found
> this, or any items that might have matched it.
>
Shari

One problem with English or indeed Australian furniture is that few
makers bothered to label their goods, so few would think to look even
though they may own something labelled. This may explain the lack of
information.

I was nearly caught out on this some years ago by a piece I inherited
and only by chance noticed a name stamped into the top of a drawer
front. On researching the name, it turned out to be that of an early
Australian maker and as such very desirable.

Modern furniture made since WWII generally has little value unless of
obvious high quality or by a very well known designer. One would need a
picture to comment on your particular piece.

Simon

Shari

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Aug 30, 2007, 5:24:38 PM8/30/07
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In article <46d6c9ce$1...@dnews.tpgi.com.au>,
Simon <vk2ua-...@yahoo.com> wrote:

> One problem with English or indeed Australian furniture is that few
> makers bothered to label their goods, so few would think to look even
> though they may own something labelled. This may explain the lack of
> information.
>
> I was nearly caught out on this some years ago by a piece I inherited
> and only by chance noticed a name stamped into the top of a drawer
> front. On researching the name, it turned out to be that of an early
> Australian maker and as such very desirable.
>
> Modern furniture made since WWII generally has little value unless of
> obvious high quality or by a very well known designer. One would need a
> picture to comment on your particular piece.
>
> Simon

And I shall oblige happily :-)

http://www.gypsyware.com/images/courtCupboard.jpg

The glass is leaded glass. The upper section is a shelf with a slot for
plates. Two drawers follow, one having an insert to separate
silverware. The bottom section is shelves for storage.

I fell in love with all of it. The detail and the hardware, most
hardware is just boring but I really like this one.

As a game maker I am working on a series of adventure games (not nearly
ready) and this in its weird way transported me to a world of days gone
past. It matches the antique map (a replica of a map of the world from
1588) hanging across from me. As my office is slowly undergoing a
makeover, populating it with things of olde goes hand in hand with my
company goals. I don't want an office that looks like an office :-)

So the value of it, while I would love to know it, is as much in my
enjoyment as anything. But I would really like to know the history of
it, and most especially what it is a replica of.

If anyone can identify what this is a replica of (verifiable on the
internet with photos of the original, maybe for sale in an antique shop
or used furniture store online?) I will happily give them a free
registration to my best selling game Blackjack Gold :-)

If more photos are needed, I have a boatload of closeups.

My fear is that it will be difficult to find other pieces that I can
afford that will go well with it.

Shari

Kris Baker

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Aug 30, 2007, 6:05:54 PM8/30/07
to

"Shari" <sh...@gypsyware.com> wrote in message
news:shari-D498D9....@news.comcast.net...

> In article <espBi.322$7P7...@newssvr19.news.prodigy.net>,
> "Kris Baker" <kris....@prodigyyy.net> wrote:
>
>> Are you sure that's not the name of the retailer?
>
> On the back of the piece it says:
>
> L. Marcus Ltd.
> makers of
> fine furniture since
> 1898
> Telephone: Clissold 1574
> Beatty Works, London, N.16
>
>
> (Kris, if this came to you my apologies. Sometimes I forget which
> programs use Cmd-R for reply versus Cmd-Shift-R.)

I don't read email that comes to this address, so that's OK ;)

Notice the clues on the label (the "Clissold" telephone exchange
that precedes a four-digit phone number and the "zone" N.16
in the address).

Your piece cannot be older than when *both* of those
numbering systems were in use (together).

I'm guessing you have a mid-Century piece created to hold
modern dinner and silverware.....from the 1940s-1960s.

Someone in the UK will know better when the phone exchanges
stopped being 3-letter alphabeticals along with the "zones" as
shown on your label.

It looks like there's pieces on eBay available at fairly low
prices (an entire set of bedroom furniture for 99-pounds
sterling, with a day to go). Go over there and search
descriptions for "Marcus Ltd" and you'll find them.

Kris


Shari

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Aug 30, 2007, 9:53:25 PM8/30/07
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In article <WbHBi.432$7P7...@newssvr19.news.prodigy.net>,
"Kris Baker" <kris....@prodigyyy.net> wrote:

Found it. Must be a totally different thing they were reproducing.
Didn't have all the bells and whistles, carvings and metalwork. I'm
still hoping to find out what mine is a reproduction of. At least they
gave a hint on theirs :-) Mine was built in 1949 according to the
documents. I remember when our phone numbers started with letters... I
was a little girl. Our phone number started with HUB standing for
HUBBARD. What the significance of that was, I don't know.

Ronnie McKinley

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Aug 31, 2007, 8:02:12 AM8/31/07
to
Shari wrote:
> I'm
> still hoping to find out what mine is a reproduction of.

You keep asking this question, but have already given the answer
yourself. In your own URL -"courtCupboard.jpg"- it's a reproduction of a
court cupboard. Not a very good one, just a mass produced machine built
thing.

This is a real court cupboard. Although there were many variations on
the style. From triple tier, double tier and even examples without any
additional tier.

http://www.earlyoakfurniture.co.uk/3.htm

If you really are that interested it's rather quite simple. Google
"court cupboard"

.... here's a start http://freenet.buffalo.edu/bah/f/glos/c/cupbd.html


--
HTH
Ronnie

Shari

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Aug 31, 2007, 9:21:12 AM8/31/07
to
In article <46d8032c$0$13926$fa0f...@news.zen.co.uk>,
Ronnie McKinley <mcki...@ontheusenet.net> wrote:

> You keep asking this question, but have already given the answer
> yourself. In your own URL -"courtCupboard.jpg"- it's a reproduction of a
> court cupboard. Not a very good one, just a mass produced machine built
> thing.
>
> This is a real court cupboard. Although there were many variations on
> the style. From triple tier, double tier and even examples without any
> additional tier.
>
> http://www.earlyoakfurniture.co.uk/3.htm
>
> If you really are that interested it's rather quite simple. Google
> "court cupboard"
>
> .... here's a start http://freenet.buffalo.edu/bah/f/glos/c/cupbd.html
>
>
> --
> HTH
> Ronnie

I am not an antique expert and never have been. I am green as far as
that goes. I'd never heard of the term "court cupboard" before this
week. I only knew that was one of the terms they used to describe it,
they also called it a server, a buffet, and some other things. So it
was a bit confusing, as I did not know the technical name for it.

I'd still like to know exactly what it was a copy of. Surely if
something is a reproduction, it is a reproduction of a very specific
piece? For instance, a 1828 Sir James VI Court Cupboard from the Rubian
Era. That is the info I am looking for. What exactly is it a copy of?

I did do a Google search. I went thru dozens of pages of photos of
court cupboards and servers and buffets and cabinets and so forth, and
did not find one like it. As you said, I found many court cupboards,
but none the same as my own. So I am still lacking the search terms I
need to find matching pieces.

I know there are thousands of pages out there with pictures of antiques
and as I have time I will try to find it. I was hoping that if I had
better search terms, I could zero in on it. If I knew exactly what it
was a reproduction of, such as a Louis VIII Court Cupboard, I could then
find matching pieces.

My goal is to know the exact thing it duplicates, so that I can see what
other pieces were made to match it (not necessarily dining room pieces
as I am not furnishing a dining room).

In other words, if I knew it was a Louis VIII Court Cupboard (or a
reproduction of), I could then search for Louis VIII furniture and see
what else was made to match it.

Does this clarify a bit?

Shari

Ronnie McKinley

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Aug 31, 2007, 10:34:25 AM8/31/07
to
Shari wrote:
<big snip>

> In other words, if I knew it was a Louis VIII Court Cupboard (or a
> reproduction of), I could then search for Louis VIII furniture and see
> what else was made to match it.
>
> Does this clarify a bit?
>

You are being totally ridiculous. Is this a wind up, or are you really
serious?

It **isn't** a reproduction of any specific period "court cupboard" it's
merely a 20th century mass produced, machine made piece of furniture. A
mishmash, made to resemble (and I use that word with extreme caution) a
generic court cupboard. For goodness sake they are still churned out
today in their thousands made by companies such as "Old Charm" "Ercol"
"Jaycee" and a load of others. The oak "Gothic" style was also popular
throughout the late 19thC and early 20thC. Even a piece made during the
late 19thC would still be referred to as "reproduction" - a Victorian
reproduction but still a reproduction - and a mishmash of styles,
regions and dates. Did you notice in the link I supplied the seller
referred to his piece as "period?"


--
Ronnie

Shari

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Aug 31, 2007, 12:24:20 PM8/31/07
to
In article <46d826d8$0$21089$da0f...@news.zen.co.uk>,
Ronnie McKinley <mcki...@ontheusenet.net> wrote:

> You are being totally ridiculous. Is this a wind up, or are you really
> serious?
>
> It **isn't** a reproduction of any specific period "court cupboard" it's
> merely a 20th century mass produced, machine made piece of furniture. A
> mishmash, made to resemble (and I use that word with extreme caution) a
> generic court cupboard. For goodness sake they are still churned out
> today in their thousands made by companies such as "Old Charm" "Ercol"
> "Jaycee" and a load of others. The oak "Gothic" style was also popular
> throughout the late 19thC and early 20thC. Even a piece made during the
> late 19thC would still be referred to as "reproduction" - a Victorian
> reproduction but still a reproduction - and a mishmash of styles,
> regions and dates. Did you notice in the link I supplied the seller
> referred to his piece as "period?"

Yes Ronnie, I am genuinely serious. I have * no knowledge * of
antiques, so please pardon if my questions seem silly to you. Trust me,
when I do tech support for the games I sell, you would be amazed at the
very basic issues I deal with, such as someone not being able to find
the menubar. (I had that one a couple weeks ago from someone who went
from Windows to Mac. No kidding.) I was patient and kind to the
person, as he was a newbie to the computer platform he was using. I
helped him on his way.

No doubt the world of antiques has a very specific lingo that I am not
knowledgeable of. Please be kind to my ignorance. This world of
antiques, reproductions, and styles is totally alien to me.

I assumed that reproduction meant reproduction of something specific. A
reproduction of a painting generally attempts to look as much like a
specific painting as possible, for example the thousands of
reproductions of Van Gogh's Starry Night. If it were attempting to be
similar to a style, wouldn't it say "in the style of Van Gogh" or
something to that effect?

I am not expecting my piece to be of great value, nor is the value of
concern though it would be interesting to know. I bought it because I
liked it and I thought it would suit my needs. And being inquisitive by
nature, now want to know more about it and what pieces were made that
match it. Surely even mass produced pieces were not made solo, but in
sets of matching things? Even the cheapest furniture made today usually
comes in sets.

From what I understand, the Maker's Mark on the back is often missing,
so searching for pieces made by L. Marcus Ltd. would not find everything
they made. Hence the need for other search terms. As we don't need
another Court Cupboard, I needed search terms that would help me match
the style of ours. Hence my posting here.

In my searchings, I found some sites that create reproductions and it
was fascinating to me. I had no idea any of this existed and it opens a
whole new world outside the normal furniture stores, which often carry
the same old boring pieces. We've also started spending more time in
antique stores looking for furniture. Our only criteria is not that it
be a genuine, highly valued antique, but that it match our tastes and be
of solid wood construction. Antiques or look-alikes open the door to a
wider variety of styles for us, which is a happy thing.

It is difficult for me and my husband to buy furniture of any kind,
attempting to match the woodwork in our house and our unique tastes (and
agree with each other on top of it :-)

As for this specific piece, I assumed that because it doesn't have the
many shelves of today's china cabinets, it probably isn't something that
most folks would want to own, being somewhat limited in its usage.

My husband is looking for a secretary's desk or a rolltop with hutch,
which will need to match the court cupboard. A tall order. I don't see
most of the secretary desks we've encountered in our price range as
being very user friendly or attractive, let alone matching in style.
And we will be getting other pieces as well, all of which will need to
blend together in the same room. Not an easy task. And it is the
reason I searched out this newsgroup.

Thank you, Ronnie, and Kris, and Simon, for taking the time to help me
in this quest. I do very much appreciate all info. Every new tidbit
opens the door a little more for me.

Ronnie McKinley

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Aug 31, 2007, 1:44:57 PM8/31/07
to
Shari wrote:
> In article <46d826d8$0$21089$da0f...@news.zen.co.uk>,
> Ronnie McKinley <mcki...@ontheusenet.net> wrote:
>
<snip>

> I assumed that reproduction meant reproduction of something specific.

You are confusing replica with mass market, machine produced,
reproductions. Your piece, and the vast majority of its ilk, is in no
way shape of form a replica of a period piece. As I've already said,
this stuff, for the most part, is just a mishmash of the real thing. It
mixes styles, regions and dates into a mishmash of machine made stuff
(no craftsmanship is involved) for a mass market. I've already suggested
a number of modern days companies which produce this stuff, there are
loads more, seek them out. I've no idea who "L Marcus Ltd" is/was. The
fact that you or anyone else can not find information about this company
should speak volumes.

As to period antique pieces. May I suggest you visit your local public
library seek out books written by Victor Chinnery. This man is an expert
on oak period furniture, both British and American (although the
American stuff will start alter than the British examples). Period
antique oak furniture is a vast subject. This is the best I can do. The
rest is up to you.

--
Ronnie

Shari

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Aug 31, 2007, 2:30:56 PM8/31/07
to
In article <46d8537e$0$11449$db0f...@news.zen.co.uk>,
Ronnie McKinley <mcki...@ontheusenet.net> wrote:

> I've no idea who "L Marcus Ltd" is/was. The
> fact that you or anyone else can not find information about this company
> should speak volumes.

I wondered about the lack of info on this company. In the days of vast
information available on the internet, I was amazed that a search on
this company produced only two items for sale and no information on the
company itself.

The piece we bought is pretty solid in its workmanship, which means
there must be many other pieces still existing from this company. We
don't have it in hand yet, but I'm pretty certain that the Maker's Mark
was screwed onto the back (based on my photos of the Maker's Mark, I see
two screws), so I believe it to be metal. I would imagine that all the
other pieces they made should still have that Mark.

Odd that so few can be found via Google. There isn't much Google can't
find.

Thank you for the assistance. I look forward to finding other pieces
that call out to me as this one did. I guess I am just one of your mass
markets :-)

If anyone is interested in a handmade, leather map reproduction (right
word?) I will share the place I bought our map. I have no connection to
this company. They are in Brazil and I am delighted with our map.
Might not suit someone who desires genuine antiques. But if you had a
room full of antiques and couldn't find a genuine map to match, his
might fit the bill. Supposedly he recreates antique maps by hand on
leather.

http://www.mapsonleather.com

I bought the map for my husband for our third wedding anniversary, which
is Leather. Hasn't hit mass market yet as I didn't find a slew of other
companies making maps on leather in my searches. I thought it was a
unique Leather gift for my one of a kind fella :-)

Ronnie McKinley

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Aug 31, 2007, 5:30:58 PM8/31/07
to Shari
Shari wrote:
> In article <46d8537e$0$11449$db0f...@news.zen.co.uk>,
> Ronnie McKinley <mcki...@ontheusenet.net> wrote:
>

> Might not suit someone who desires genuine antiques. But if you had a
> room full of antiques and couldn't find a genuine map to match, his
> might fit the bill. Supposedly he recreates antique maps by hand on
> leather.

For some reason I just don't think you quite entirely grasp the concept
of antiques and antique collecting.

How does one actually "recreates antique maps" that is just a
contradiction, plain nonsense.


--
Ronnie

Ronnie McKinley

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Aug 31, 2007, 5:32:20 PM8/31/07
to
Shari wrote:
> In article <46d8537e$0$11449$db0f...@news.zen.co.uk>,
> Ronnie McKinley <mcki...@ontheusenet.net> wrote:
>

> Might not suit someone who desires genuine antiques. But if you had a
> room full of antiques and couldn't find a genuine map to match, his
> might fit the bill. Supposedly he recreates antique maps by hand on
> leather.

For some reason I just don't think you quite entirely grasp the concept

of antiques and antique collecting.

How does one actually "recreate antique maps" that is just a

David Nebenzahl

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Aug 31, 2007, 8:14:27 PM8/31/07
to
On 8/31/2007 2:30 PM Ronnie McKinley spake thus:

ITSMTS "antique-looking maps". Or some such.

Shari

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Sep 1, 2007, 1:36:57 AM9/1/07
to
In article <46d888c7$0$11449$db0f...@news.zen.co.uk>,
Ronnie McKinley <mcki...@ontheusenet.net> wrote:

He looks at an old, old map, or a picture of one, and he painstakingly
attempts to recreate it by hand. It is an antique? No. Is it a
lookalike, a recreation, a copy? Yes. Is it desireable? Yes, to
anybody who does not require absolute perfection, but just enjoyment of
something beautiful, and especially those who would have loved a genuine
antique map, but could never afford such a thing. We cannot all be
elitists.

In fact, if everyone were an elitist, the antique shops would go broke.
Someone must want the imperfect, the copies, the not quite as olds.
There is room for all.

We do not collect antiques, nor do we have much knowledge of them, as
I've stated. We simply bought an interesting old piece of furniture and
wanted to know more about it. We do collect other things, more
passionately, and more prestigiously. Our areas of knowledge and
expertise do exist, just not in this venue. I would never presume that
everyone who dabbled in the areas where we are experts, should also
become an expert. In life we should do what makes us happy. Perfection
rarely achieves that.

The happiest folks I know are also the simplest folks. I envy them.
They possess riches far beyond yours or mine. They possess a purity of
joy and laughter that few people will ever achieve in life. They have
achieved genuine perfection.

Moral of the story: Laugh often. Loosen your knickers. Imperfections
exist. Copycats exist. Simple folks exist. Replicas exist, by
whatever term makes you happy to call them. And that's okay.

Balanced View

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Sep 1, 2007, 8:20:51 AM9/1/07
to
Those are awful looking things, not anything like a genuine map at all.
You can get an original map
for less than $75.00
http://www.raremaps.com/cgi-bin/map-builder.cgi?America+America.

Ronnie McKinley

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Sep 1, 2007, 11:28:16 AM9/1/07
to


Absolutely!! I was about to reply to this Shari woman. She speaks like
antiques maps are some kind of rare object, like hens teeth or
something. A load of old codswallop.

I done with this nonsense. Not going to waste my time replying to this
Shari person any longer. She obviously hasn't clue what she is talking
about, and worse, not even prepared to read correctly the replies, and
hasn't the first notion why folk want antique in the first place and not
some shit repro.


What you been doing, Mike? :)

--
Ronnie

Ronnie McKinley

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Sep 1, 2007, 11:36:19 AM9/1/07
to


"some such" (??) ... "some such" load of nonsense.

--
Ronnie

Kris Baker

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Sep 1, 2007, 12:37:01 PM9/1/07
to

"Balanced View" <Ni...@nill.net> wrote in message
news:fbblb1$u2p$1...@aioe.org...

The leather maps were popular in the US during the 1960s/1970s
"Mediterranean" period.....and went well with the big, bulky furniture,
gold and pea green and brown earthtones, and wrought iron.
But usually, such maps were from Pier One or another importer
for well under $100.

Originals, preserved, are always best....and will go with anything.

Kris


Sanity

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Sep 2, 2007, 6:52:51 PM9/2/07
to

"Ronnie McKinley" <mcki...@ontheusenet.net> wrote in message
news:46d986da$0$11438$db0f...@news.zen.co.uk...


.....Still molesting the newbies Ronnie...? Given your harsh tones and your
'elitist' underpinnings you will die a very lonely old man. Although one can
respect your copius quantities of knowledge, the respect stops there. You,
as a human, are an utter failure.
Never forget my friend, "what goes 'round, comes 'round. " ......and you, of
all posters to this ng, are not worthy of the lofty perch to which you are
assigned. .
You use your so-called "knowledge" as stick with which to beat innocent
posters about the head. I'm sure that 'shame" is not in your lexicon however
you should be ashamed of the way with which you treat others. My father,
who passed away one month ago, was much like you. A formidable titan of
knowledge in the antique realm, he too used his knowledge as a stick, a
stick with which to alienate all those around him. He died alone, in a
hospital bed, with nary a soul about him. In the end, his knowledge was his
demise. Only when it was to late did he realize that the true measure of a
man is how he treats others and not how "smart" he was. Maybe one day you
too Ronnie will be faced with your "lifetime" achievements splayed out
before you.....and maybe, just maybe, you will see that love towards your
fellow man is indeed a gift which surpasses all others......a lesson which
at your ripe old age would appear to have eluded you.

Balanced View

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Sep 4, 2007, 1:44:52 PM9/4/07
to
Still slaving away at the appraisal business, soon to be producing my
own video** tutorials and Antique identification guides
based on the College night courses I taught back in the early 1990's.
I'll market them for download from my websites and
see how they go. I'm still puttering about in the retail side of the
antique business when I find a piece I can mark up a ton and
working on "The Toy" ( my 66 Ducati).


**Picked up an IMac, great fun with the video software.

Best regards

Mike

hanha...@gmail.com

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Mar 16, 2017, 5:05:46 PM3/16/17
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Hi,
I did the same and found you on the internet.
I have 2 wardrobe doors for sale on gum tree, sadly the rest is not in a good state, but can be used. I am based in Walsall

ashtk...@gmail.com

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May 6, 2017, 7:44:01 PM5/6/17
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quality juju hats,bamileke kings table,ndop mud cloth and many more available

alexlin...@gmail.com

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Jun 8, 2017, 6:21:09 AM6/8/17
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On Thursday, 30 August 2007 02:10:30 UTC+1, Shari wrote:
> I've just purchased a beautiful piece and was hoping to see what other
> matching pieces existed. When I searched all of Google, I could find
> nothing on the manufacturer, or anyone selling any pieces by this
> manufacturer.
>
> Has anyone heard of L. Marcus Ltd. in London, England, who created
> furniture circa 1949?
>
> I purchased a dining room piece, and would love to know what other
> things they created and what those pieces look like.
>
> I don't know if it's good or bad that on all the internet I could find
> no mention of this manufacturer or pieces for sale made by them.
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> --
> Windows and Macintosh shareware games
> Blackjack game
> http://www.gypsyware.com

Hi Shari

We have a Gents wardrobe in good condition with a rub and a dressing table with a little veneer peel, from the 1960's, would take £250.00 for the pair collected Yorkshire

sp.insta...@gmail.com

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Nov 27, 2017, 5:33:01 PM11/27/17
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Ronnie McKinley. 10 years on and you still sound like an old cunt. unhelpful, sanctimonious prick

les.at...@gmail.com

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Dec 28, 2017, 1:30:16 PM12/28/17
to
On Thursday, August 30, 2007 at 2:10:30 AM UTC+1, Shari wrote:
> I've just purchased a beautiful piece and was hoping to see what other
> matching pieces existed. When I searched all of Google, I could find
> nothing on the manufacturer, or anyone selling any pieces by this
> manufacturer.
>
> Has anyone heard of L. Marcus Ltd. in London, England, who created
> furniture circa 1949?
>
> I purchased a dining room piece, and would love to know what other
> things they created and what those pieces look like.
>
> I don't know if it's good or bad that on all the internet I could find
> no mention of this manufacturer or pieces for sale made by them.
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> --
> Windows and Macintosh shareware games
> Blackjack game
> http://www.gypsyware.com

If it is still of any interest, my wife's parents bought a sideboard from them in the 50s/60s and it was, apparently, quite expensive. Shortly afterwards the company ceased making this kind of furniture and started making office furniture. I believe the reason was they could no longer compete on price. As for the comment in another post about it being 'machine made', I've looked this over and the panelling looks hand carved to me though I can't speak for the carcass. You can still buy handmade furniture in furniture stores and over the years I've seen craftsmen from Bevan & Funnell, Rackstraw and others demonstrating their craft at in-store special events. I've only ever seen one other similar piece and that had been 'renovated' and then painted.

paulinecam...@gmail.com

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Apr 16, 2018, 10:19:49 AM4/16/18
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Hi,I have a piece of furniture by this company, it's a tall shoe hat and coat stand with mirror. I have no idea how old it is or what wood it is.
It has the original stamp with London address on the back.

Regards

josmi...@gmail.com

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Apr 21, 2018, 8:31:51 AM4/21/18
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All my mums bedroom furniture has this mark on, still trying to find info on it as she’s had it since she was married in about 1949 and I want it to go to a good home

fotheringpo...@gmail.com

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May 7, 2020, 11:52:00 AM5/7/20
to
L Marcus Ltd, makers of fine furniture since 1898, Beatty Works, London, N26. Label on Oak monks beach / table 🎨
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