Old Roper stove worth anything?

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Alta47

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Nov 3, 2008, 2:53:23 PM11/3/08
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I bought a house with an old Roper stove that I plan to get rid of. I'm
guessing it's a 40's or 50' model. I've seen completely restored ones that
sell for a lot of money. I am in New Jersey.

Does an old stove like this have any value as an antique or to people who do
restore them?

Most likely I will end up putting it out front with a "free" sign on it and
someone will take it for scrap metal. But I was just wondering if it might
be of any value other than as just scrap metal.


Rusty_Hinge

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Nov 3, 2008, 3:59:04 PM11/3/08
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The message <genkrh$32a$1...@aioe.org>
from "Alta47" <Alt...@alt47alt.lkj> contains these words:

> I bought a house with an old Roper stove that I plan to get rid of. I'm
> guessing it's a 40's or 50' model. I've seen completely restored ones that
> sell for a lot of money. I am in New Jersey.

> Does an old stove like this have any value as an antique or to people
> who do
> restore them?

Here in the UK old stoves can fetch quite a lot of money. I paid a
hundred pounds Sterling for an old Godin cylinder stove - like a
Tortoise, but slightly prettier...

> Most likely I will end up putting it out front with a "free" sign on it and
> someone will take it for scrap metal. But I was just wondering if it might
> be of any value other than as just scrap metal.

Scrap is worth zilch ATM.

--
Rusty
Direct reply to: horrid dot squeak snailything zetnet point co period uk
Separator in search of a sig

Tim Mullen

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Nov 3, 2008, 5:06:53 PM11/3/08
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In <genkrh$32a$1...@aioe.org> "Alta47" <Alt...@alt47alt.lkj> writes:

>I bought a house with an old Roper stove that I plan to get rid of. I'm
>guessing it's a 40's or 50' model. I've seen completely restored ones that
>sell for a lot of money. I am in New Jersey.

You're correct; restored cookers can indeed fetch a sum. See:

http://www.antiqueappliances.com

Now for the bad news. Most of that cost is due to restoration.
Carefully pulling a major appliance apart, cleaning and *correctly*
refinishing the skins, repairing or replacing defective parts,
etc. is quite labor intensive.

If I were you I'd place an ad on Craigslist offering it for
free, or a nominal sum.

--
Tim Mullen
------------------------------------------------------------------
Am I in your basement? Looking for antique televisions, fans, etc.
------ finger this account or call anytime: (212)-463-0552 -------

Alta47

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Nov 4, 2008, 9:53:59 AM11/4/08
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Thanks. I looked at the website link and my stove is similar to one they
show there, except that mine is a 4-burner and there's is a 6-burner. And,
of course, mine is unrestored.

I think that what you wrote after "Now for the bad news" is correct. I does
seem that unrestored old stoves have virtually no value. If I happened to
know of a place in my area that restored old stoves I would check with them
in case they had any use for it. But it looks like there may only be one or
two places in the U.S. that do this and none are in my state or even in any
nearby states.

Rather than running an add and having to deal with callers, I am probably
just going to place the stove out front with a "free" sign on it. If
nothing else, someone will take it for its scrap metal value. Scrap metal
isn't worth a lot, but it is worth enough that many people collect it where
I live. All anyone needs to do is put scrap metal out by the curb and it is
gone -- often within an hour or two if it is on a fairly busy road like the
one where my house is located.


"Tim Mullen" <t...@panix.com> wrote in message
news:genslt$555$1...@reader1.panix.com...

Tim Mullen

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Nov 4, 2008, 11:35:03 AM11/4/08
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In <gepnm4$17b$1...@aioe.org> "Alta47" <Alt...@alt47alt.lkj> writes:

>Thanks. I looked at the website link and my stove is similar to one they
>show there, except that mine is a 4-burner and there's is a 6-burner. And,
>of course, mine is unrestored.

They do have some bone cool appliances.

>I think that what you wrote after "Now for the bad news" is correct. I does
>seem that unrestored old stoves have virtually no value. If I happened to
>know of a place in my area that restored old stoves I would check with them
>in case they had any use for it. But it looks like there may only be one or
>two places in the U.S. that do this and none are in my state or even in any
>nearby states.

It's a shame, really. I don't have a vintage stove (I don't cook; I live
in Manhattan) but I do have a 1935 fridge for beer/vodka that's the cat's
pajamas. Old appliances rock, but are a lot to restore.

>Rather than running an add and having to deal with callers, I am probably
>just going to place the stove out front with a "free" sign on it. If
>nothing else, someone will take it for its scrap metal value. Scrap metal
>isn't worth a lot, but it is worth enough that many people collect it where
>I live. All anyone needs to do is put scrap metal out by the curb and it is
>gone -- often within an hour or two if it is on a fairly busy road like the
>one where my house is located.

I hear ya. That's what I'd probably do if I were in your shoes.

Alta47

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Nov 5, 2008, 9:02:23 AM11/5/08
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"Tim Mullen" <t...@panix.com> wrote in message
news:geptjn$ft6$1...@reader1.panix.com...

>
> It's a shame, really. I don't have a vintage stove (I don't cook; I
> live
> in Manhattan) but I do have a 1935 fridge for beer/vodka that's the cat's
> pajamas. Old appliances rock, but are a lot to restore.

I think old stoves are cool. The one I am getting rid of is in a house that
I just bought and that I will be renting out. Because the stove is so old
that I think it is too risky for me to leave it in a rental property. I
would be concerned about a gas leak if the pilot goes out, etc.

In the house where I do live, I inherited an old stove with the house that I
still use. But, all I really do is use the top burners for cooking and have
never even tried using the oven portion. It's a Chambers stove that looks
like the one that is seen in the kitchen on the Rachael Ray "30-minute
meals" cooking show on TV. I don't usually watch the show but I just
happened to see it one day in passing. I saw her decide to broil something
and watched her turn a handle and -- voila! -- the broiler opened up. I
have that same broiler on my stove and didn't even know it until I saw her
turn that handle on TV (duh). I guess you can tell that I am not a cook.

I saw your tag line about old TV's. About 5 years ago, I bought an old RCA
TV at a yard sale from a guy who was retired and who used to work on the
assembly line at RCA in Camden, NJ. He was working there in 1948 when this
TV was built on the assembly line where he worked and he bought it new then.
As far as I know, it doesn't work, but I thought the TV looked cool so I
bought it.


Rusty_Hinge

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Nov 5, 2008, 10:24:03 AM11/5/08
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The message <ges91g$p92$1...@aioe.org>

from "Alta47" <Alt...@alt47alt.lkj> contains these words:
> "Tim Mullen" <t...@panix.com> wrote in message
> news:geptjn$ft6$1...@reader1.panix.com...
> >
> > It's a shame, really. I don't have a vintage stove (I don't cook; I
> > live
> > in Manhattan) but I do have a 1935 fridge for beer/vodka that's the cat's
> > pajamas. Old appliances rock, but are a lot to restore.

> I think old stoves are cool. The one I am getting rid of is in a
> house that
> I just bought and that I will be renting out. Because the stove is so old
> that I think it is too risky for me to leave it in a rental property. I
> would be concerned about a gas leak if the pilot goes out, etc.

Two countries divided by a common language - there was I thinking you
meant a (probably) solid fuel stove for heating, not a cooker/range...

Tim Mullen

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Nov 5, 2008, 12:30:26 PM11/5/08
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In <ges91g$p92$1...@aioe.org> "Alta47" <Alt...@alt47alt.lkj> writes:

>In the house where I do live, I inherited an old stove with the house that I
>still use. But, all I really do is use the top burners for cooking and have
>never even tried using the oven portion. It's a Chambers stove that looks
>like the one that is seen in the kitchen on the Rachael Ray "30-minute
>meals" cooking show on TV. I don't usually watch the show but I just
>happened to see it one day in passing. I saw her decide to broil something
>and watched her turn a handle and -- voila! -- the broiler opened up. I
>have that same broiler on my stove and didn't even know it until I saw her
>turn that handle on TV (duh). I guess you can tell that I am not a cook.

Heh. If you are what you eat, I'm fast, cheap, and easy. :)

According to the antiqueappliances.com people, a properly running
vintage stove can be the equal of a modern Viking range, and look much
cooler. This takes a tune-up, including application of valve grease
(who knew?).

>I saw your tag line about old TV's. About 5 years ago, I bought an old RCA
>TV at a yard sale from a guy who was retired and who used to work on the
>assembly line at RCA in Camden, NJ. He was working there in 1948 when this
>TV was built on the assembly line where he worked and he bought it new then.
>As far as I know, it doesn't work, but I thought the TV looked cool so I
>bought it.

That would be a 8XXYY model. I have a 1948 8TS30; the first 8 stands
for 1948, TS for Tabletop Set, and 30 is the number of tubes. The sets
to look for are the pre-wars:

http://earlytelevision.org/rca_1932.html

Be still, my heart!

I worked as a design engineer at RCA Broadcast Systems in Camden
back in the mid 80's. One of the above was probably sitting in the
factory, still in the shipping crate. Alas, I was a young punk and
didn't give a rat's ass about such stuff then.

Tim Mullen

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Nov 5, 2008, 12:32:34 PM11/5/08
to

>Two countries divided by a common language - there was I thinking you
>meant a (probably) solid fuel stove for heating, not a cooker/range...

Heh. Us Yanks have always wondered what those gas-guzzling Range
Rovers have to do with cooking. :) :)

Rusty_Hinge

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Nov 5, 2008, 2:32:43 PM11/5/08
to
The message <geslbi$15i$2...@reader1.panix.com>
from Tim Mullen <t...@panix.com> contains these words:

> >Two countries divided by a common language - there was I thinking you
> >meant a (probably) solid fuel stove for heating, not a cooker/range...

> Heh. Us Yanks have always wondered what those gas-guzzling Range
> Rovers have to do with cooking. :) :)

Open the bonnet补吵 and you'll smell what's frying.

补吵 hood, to you

As for me, I have a 1959 SIIA SWB Hardtop Land Rover with a Ford 3
litre补澈 V6 Essex Engine, standard lo/hi ratios, overdrive, front-drive
disconnectors, etc.

补澈 liter to you

That doesn't cook, it rocks...

David Nebenzahl

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Nov 5, 2008, 7:24:26 PM11/5/08
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On 11/5/2008 11:32 AM Rusty_Hinge spake thus:

> As for me, I have a 1959 SIIA SWB Hardtop Land Rover with a Ford 3

> litre硃竟 V6 Essex Engine, standard lo/hi ratios, overdrive, front-drive
> disconnectors, etc.
>
> 硃竟 liter to you

Ackshooly, that would be "cubic inch" to me (or at least used to be, as
in 427 c.i.).


--
Washing one's hands of the conflict between the powerful and the
powerless means to side with the powerful, not to be neutral.

- Paulo Freire

alta47

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Nov 5, 2008, 9:16:12 PM11/5/08
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"Tim Mullen" <t...@panix.com> wrote in message
news:gesl7i$15i$1...@reader1.panix.com...

>
> That would be a 8XXYY model. I have a 1948 8TS30; the first 8 stands
> for 1948, TS for Tabletop Set, and 30 is the number of tubes. The sets
> to look for are the pre-wars:

Interesting. I just checked mine and unfortunately the one part of the ID
sticker that is missing is right after it says, "Model". Just below that
it says that the serial number is C 840423, but I doubt if that tells you
anything. It is a table model and there is a tube diagram on the inside of
the case that seems to show about 23 tubes (+/-).

Rusty_Hinge

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Nov 5, 2008, 7:51:27 PM11/5/08
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The message <49123933$0$23442$8226...@news.adtechcomputers.com>
from David Nebenzahl <nob...@but.us.chickens> contains these words:

> On 11/5/2008 11:32 AM Rusty_Hinge spake thus:

> > As for me, I have a 1959 SIIA SWB Hardtop Land Rover with a Ford 3
> > litre硃竟 V6 Essex Engine, standard lo/hi ratios, overdrive, front-drive
> > disconnectors, etc.
> >
> > 硃竟 liter to you

> Ackshooly, that would be "cubic inch" to me (or at least used to be, as
> in 427 c.i.).

Butbutbut - that would require the magick of arithmetic...

Tim Mullen

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Nov 6, 2008, 10:11:47 AM11/6/08
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In <getk1g$1fp$1...@aioe.org> "alta47" <alt...@alta47.a47> writes:

[1948 RCA television]

>Interesting. I just checked mine and unfortunately the one part of the ID
>sticker that is missing is right after it says, "Model". Just below that
>it says that the serial number is C 840423, but I doubt if that tells you
>anything. It is a table model and there is a tube diagram on the inside of
>the case that seems to show about 23 tubes (+/-).

Hmm. You can look at mugshots here:

http://www.tvhistory.tv/1946-49-RCA.htm

I must admit, I'm not sure about the 8TS243 and their ilk. This breaks
the mold of the suffix being the number of tubes.

Sets of this era were Done Right. Designed before the race to the
bottom began in consumer electronics. They are twitchy, but once up
and running can produce a quite sharp b/w picture.

Alta47

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Nov 6, 2008, 10:53:51 AM11/6/08
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"Tim Mullen" <t...@panix.com> wrote in message
news:gev1fi$ed3$1...@reader1.panix.com...

>
> Hmm. You can look at mugshots here:
>
> http://www.tvhistory.tv/1946-49-RCA.htm
>

Mine looks like this one from the website,

http://www.tvhistory.tv/1949-RCA-9T246-10in.JPG

although I'll have to go home tonight to double check and compare mine to
the image. So, maybe mine was 1949 model. The guy said he helped build it
while working on the production line in 1948.

You probably already know that the old RCA building in Camden was made into
"luxury loft apartments". I think that was the "Nipper Building", and they
may be redoing another RCA building there. I have you beat in terms of
working in Camden. While in college in the very late 60's I worked during
the summer at the Campbell Soup "River Plant" in the production lines. Part
of the time I worked as a "Pork and Beans Janitor" (really, that's what they
said my job was), and at other times I worked on V-8 Juice line and on soup
production lines.


Tim Mullen

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Nov 6, 2008, 11:23:00 AM11/6/08
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In <gev3uf$hd0$1...@aioe.org> "Alta47" <Alt...@alt47alt.lkj> writes:

>Mine looks like this one from the website,

>http://www.tvhistory.tv/1949-RCA-9T246-10in.JPG

>although I'll have to go home tonight to double check and compare mine to
>the image. So, maybe mine was 1949 model. The guy said he helped build it
>while working on the production line in 1948.

That makes sense. It's pretty cool having one the guy actually
built. Imagine how nice & new & shiny that baby was when he brought
it home. It would've been the pride and joy of the family. They'd
switch it on, it would start to glow and hum, warm up and give off
that distinctive smell... It's alive!

These are some of the RCA's kicking around my crib:

http://www.tvhistory.tv/1946-RCA-621TS-7in.JPG
http://www.tvhistory.tv/1949-RCA-8TS30-10in.JPG
http://www.tvhistory.tv/1947-RCA-741PCS-Proj.JPG

>You probably already know that the old RCA building in Camden was made into
>"luxury loft apartments". I think that was the "Nipper Building", and they
>may be redoing another RCA building there.

Yes, I had heard about that. The Nipper Building had been built by the
Victor company, of Victrola fame. The big iron gates had (have) this cool
"V" (for Vendetta :) logo. At the time I worked there it was the factory
for Broadcast Systems, amongst other things. Us engineers were in buildings
down near the river. I understand these have since been torn down.

>I have you beat in terms of
>working in Camden. While in college in the very late 60's I worked during
>the summer at the Campbell Soup "River Plant" in the production lines. Part
>of the time I worked as a "Pork and Beans Janitor" (really, that's what they
>said my job was), and at other times I worked on V-8 Juice line and on soup
>production lines.

I do remember the smells. :) I'm a big fan of Campbell soups.
I think it's cool you can still buy tomato soup that looks like it did
decades ago. If they ever mess with that label I'm gonna be pissed!

Alta47

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Nov 6, 2008, 12:14:02 PM11/6/08
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"Tim Mullen" <t...@panix.com> wrote in message
news:gev5l4$gtp$1...@reader1.panix.com...

They look cool. I didn't even know they had any type of projection TV's
back then.

There is a hardware store in Moorestown that has an old TV in the store.
They took out the picture tube etc. and placed a small portable TV inside
the cabinet where the picture tube was. Then they connected a hidden DVD
player to the portable TV and have it playing a DVD of old black and white
Jackie Gleason shows. So, when you walk in, it just looks like an old TV
with the Jackie Gleason Show playing on it. It's an amazing effect.


Tim Mullen

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Nov 6, 2008, 1:19:47 PM11/6/08
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In <gev8kp$6bt$1...@aioe.org> "Alta47" <Alt...@alt47alt.lkj> writes:

>"Tim Mullen" <t...@panix.com> wrote in message
>news:gev5l4$gtp$1...@reader1.panix.com...

>> http://www.tvhistory.tv/1947-RCA-741PCS-Proj.JPG

>They look cool. I didn't even know they had any type of projection TV's
>back then.

She's a beast! 295lbs. There's a shot of it running, with a
DVD of "The Day the Earth Stood Still" at:

http://www.gothicdigital.com/shoot/

I think it's the first picture. My webserver's down right now because
I have electricians milling around my loft; I'll bring it back online
when I get home tonight. That was a video shoot, so pardon the mess.

>There is a hardware store in Moorestown that has an old TV in the store.
>They took out the picture tube etc. and placed a small portable TV inside
>the cabinet where the picture tube was. Then they connected a hidden DVD
>player to the portable TV and have it playing a DVD of old black and white
>Jackie Gleason shows. So, when you walk in, it just looks like an old TV
>with the Jackie Gleason Show playing on it. It's an amazing effect.

Aiiiyeeeee!!!!! This is akin to polyurethane on nice old furniture. :)

In all seriousness, some manglements, er, "conversions", can look
pretty good. And most post-war sets are a dime a dozen. But, still...

Ronnie McKinley

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Nov 6, 2008, 1:36:29 PM11/6/08
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Tim Mullen wrote:

> Aiiiyeeeee!!!!! This is akin to polyurethane on nice old furniture. :)
>


No it's not. Get real!!


--
Ronnie

Garrapata

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Aug 31, 2011, 11:52:01 AM8/31/11
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>It's a Chambers stove
I don't know Roper but Chambers is a good quality stove. It was
expensive when it was new
--

09=IX

Nancy2

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Aug 31, 2011, 4:38:37 PM8/31/11
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I have to ask why you dragged out a 3-year-old post to respond?

N.

leek...@insightbb.com

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Dec 2, 2012, 4:06:42 PM12/2/12
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mdav...@aol.com

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Feb 25, 2013, 2:37:35 PM2/25/13
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On Monday, November 3, 2008 1:53:23 PM UTC-6, Alta47 wrote:
> I bought a house with an old Roper stove that I plan to get rid of. I'm guessing it's a 40's or 50' model. I've seen completely restored ones that sell for a lot of money. I am in New Jersey.Does an old stove like this have any value as an antique or to people who do restore them?Most likely I will end up putting it out front with a "free" sign on it and someone will take it for scrap metal. But I was just wondering if it might be of any value other than as just scrap metal.

i habve a kinmore. that was my mothers. for a cost of $234.89 its in great shape. did have a problem wioth finding knobs. have been offered |$35OO. but wont sell. the stove was bought in Detroit Mich. in 1951. has ran sa good as you could ask.

wardel...@gmail.com

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Dec 11, 2013, 12:59:02 PM12/11/13
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Restored they go for $500 and up

lynda...@gmail.com

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Dec 25, 2016, 7:26:15 PM12/25/16
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1940_1950 4burner gas top. Oven with warming unit beside oven. White porcelain

jcoo...@gmail.com

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Jun 16, 2018, 9:20:23 AM6/16/18
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A restored 1949 gas 6 burner stove sells for $6,800.
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