cold heat

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peterB

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Jan 4, 2005, 5:53:46 PM1/4/05
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Hi,
Has anyone seen or used this new soldering iron called 'cold heat'?
Seems like it would not heat up the wires enough to create a good bond
between the wire and the solder. The ad makes it look as if it melts
the solder instantly, which wouldn't give time for the wire to heat up.
Any thoughts?

Thanks,

-Pete

You already know that

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Jan 4, 2005, 5:57:42 PM1/4/05
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If you look back not long ago there is probably a thread on the
subject. Use Google or your ISP will probably have dropped it by now.
It seemed to me there was a lot of skepticism.

Ken G.

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Jan 4, 2005, 7:40:51 PM1/4/05
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I saw that infomercial . It looks to me like the tip is split and when
you touch both halves to metal it uses the work you are soldering to
compete the connection and cause it to heat up fast .

Bill Turner

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Jan 4, 2005, 8:13:55 PM1/4/05
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SAME EFFECT AS NOT CHANGING THE TIP IN YOUR WELLER.


CHECK MY WEBSITE: www.dialcover.com
Bill Turner, excuse caps, short answers, stroke.
Business SASE, each order a copy of The Pocket Resource Guide.


Timmi

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Jan 4, 2005, 8:43:32 PM1/4/05
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RatShack is selling them. I tried one with
the clear understanding of the manager
that if I didn't like it, I'd be able to return it
for a full refund. Tip lasted all of 1/2 hour
of use. Seems to be a high voltage metal
clad switching PS using some kind of a
thermocouple. (read real nice damped
wave of about 600V peak-to-peak on the
worn tip when the element sheath gave way
to the inner element...remember this if you
use this thing to solder ANYTHING of
the CMOS variety...)

In short, it was a nother redundant
piece-o-crap from China. Junk. Phooey!

Stay away from it and use an old
reliable Ungar or Weller plug-in model.

"peterB" <zar...@albany.net> wrote in message
news:1104879226.7...@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...

Bill Sheppard

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Jan 4, 2005, 8:41:47 PM1/4/05
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First thought upon seeing the ad was that the thing must work by
resistance soldering, i.e., sending a heavy current thru the workpiece.
Wonder what kind of battery it uses, Bill(oc)

Phil B

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Jan 4, 2005, 11:20:05 PM1/4/05
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Timmi,

It sounds like it uses the "resistance soldering" method.
See http://www.contacteast.com/product/group.asp?parent_id=15 or google
"resistance soldering".

Typical bigger units use stainless steel or carbon electrodes.
Apparently keeping the electrodes clean is a common problem when rosin
and corrosion builds up. It is said that filing the electrodes is common
practice.

I would expect that it does indeed have a switching converter to step
the 6 volts from the 4 AA cells down to say 1 volt or so at higher
current. You said the tip lasted for 1/2 hour but you didn't say how
many solder connections you made and how much metal you were trying to
heat.

Descriptions of this unit on the web say temperature can reach 800
degrees. This should be plenty to conduct heat through the molten solder
to the wires to flow the solder as long as there isn't too much heat
sinking going on.

Since it is powered by AA cells, by implication, it is intended for
occasional portable light-duty use. I would never think of using it to
solder a tube socket pin with a wad of wires connected to it.

As for CMOS work, the voltage should be low enough (say 1 volt) to not
cause any problem. Are you sure about that 600V p-p reading? That
doesn't make any sense to me. What do you mean by a "real nice damped
wave". Did you see a square wave or sine wave. What was the frequency?

Phil B


"Timmi" <socvee...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1a306$41db464f$d1cc458e$88...@snip.allthenewsgroups.com...

Phil B

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Jan 5, 2005, 12:20:59 AM1/5/05
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Well the on-line manual at radioshack answers just about all the
questions.
http://www.radioshack.com/images/ProductCatalog/Manuals/OME64-2102.pdf

"To heat the tip, carefully place it against the electrically-conductive
work piece so that both tip electrodes make solid contact with it.
The red operating light will shine and the tip will create heat almost
instantly, allowing for clean solder flow and the formation of a
smooth joint. A slight spark may occur at the tip during soldering".

It's uses resistance soldering. It requires good electrical contact
between the tip and the metal being soldered, or as stated elsewhere,
you can bridge the two halves of the tip with solder to get it started.
It has a red light that comes on when contact is made.

"When soldering electronic parts with a small pin-out (or any part with
“legs” or leads that are close together), use caution not to bridge
two or more different pins with the opposite halves of the Split-Tip™.
Doing so will cause a current discharge into the part and may damage
it".

Guess the voltage is enough to damage SS parts if applied across leads.
This thing may not have a switching power converter. It may just use the
raw 6 volts from the AA cells. Maybe the tip has "just the right amount"
of resistance to cause it to heat locally when bridged by a conductor
and still not draw excessive current at 6 volts from the AA cells.

Also, it says you can expect up to 750 solder joints from one set of
batteries (lithium recommended).

This thing sounds pretty good for occasional portable use. I personally
don't do that very often. All my soldering is on the bench with my
Weller soldering station. If I had the need, for $19.95 I would buy one.

Phil B


"Phil B" <pcb...@NOSPAMcomcast.net> wrote in message
news:1YmdnQpfuMT...@comcast.com...

Bill M

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Jan 5, 2005, 12:48:48 AM1/5/05
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Phil B wrote:


> Also, it says you can expect up to 750 solder joints from one set of
> batteries (lithium recommended).
>
> This thing sounds pretty good for occasional portable use. I personally
> don't do that very often. All my soldering is on the bench with my
> Weller soldering station. If I had the need, for $19.95 I would buy one.
>
> Phil B

There's been a couple of threads on Alan's Forum about these and a
couple guys tried them out. The opinion is unanimous that its a piece
of junk with no redeeming virtues.

-Bill

Bill M

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Jan 5, 2005, 12:59:39 AM1/5/05
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Bill M wrote:


>
> There's been a couple of threads on Alan's Forum about these and a
> couple guys tried them out. The opinion is unanimous that its a piece
> of junk with no redeeming virtues.
>
> -Bill

http://antiqueradios.com/forums/Forum5/HTML/002414.html
http://antiqueradios.com/forums/Forum5/HTML/002371.html
http://antiqueradios.com/forums/Forum5/HTML/002218.html
http://antiqueradios.com/forums/Forum5/HTML/001947.html

Phil B

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Jan 5, 2005, 2:00:04 AM1/5/05
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I guess that ends the discussion! I liked the post about trying to melt
a solder joint for 30 seconds and the iron melted before the solder
joint melted!

I just got a new Weller WESD51 a while back. Highly recommended! But
then again practically any old Weller soldering station always worked
great.

Phil B

"Bill M" <dontspam...@coqui.net> wrote in message
news:10tn0ie...@corp.supernews.com...

William Sommerwerck

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Jan 5, 2005, 8:32:44 AM1/5/05
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I have a NiCad portable soldering iron I purchased over 30 years ago. (Wen or
Weller, I forget which -- the company makes hair clippers.) For what it was it
worked very well. I think it's still in working order.

The funniest part of the Cold Heat ad are the numbers showing how the tool heats
to 800 degrees almost instantly, then drops back to 0 (!!!) degrees.

The ad says you can solder "anything," but the tool is obviously limited to very
light-duty use -- there's just so much energy a 6V battery supply can provice.

Jim Simmons

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Jan 5, 2005, 8:35:11 AM1/5/05
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"Bill Sheppard" <old...@webtv.net> wrote in message
news:20418-41D...@storefull-3171.bay.webtv.net...

> First thought upon seeing the ad was that the thing must work by
> resistance soldering, i.e., sending a heavy current thru the workpiece.
> Wonder what kind of battery it uses, Bill(oc)
>

They use 4 double A (AA) batteries. Great for working in cramped spaces
(i.e. most pc boards). the tip is cold until you touch the place to be
soldered, no heat radiated from the tip. Only that point, where the tip
touches, gets hot.
Yes, I own one, I also own a 20watt, 35watt, and 50watt soldering irons.
Each has it's purpose.

Jim


Bill Turner

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Jan 5, 2005, 9:05:00 AM1/5/05
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I HAVE BEEN CONTEMPLATING PURCHASE, BUT NOT FOR THE SOLDERING EQUIPMENT.
THE STRIPPER SOLD WITH IT ON CABLE LOOKS GOOD.

Stephanie Weil

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Jan 5, 2005, 9:37:06 AM1/5/05
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In article <10tnr3r...@corp.supernews.com>, William Sommerwerck
wrote:
> I have a NiCad portable soldering iron I purchased over 30 years
> ago. (Wen or Weller, I forget which -- the company makes hair clippers.)

Sounds to me like it would be Wahl. That's the clipper manufacturer I
know.

--
Stephanie Weil
New York City, U.S.A.

Bill Jeffrey

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Jan 5, 2005, 10:29:16 AM1/5/05
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Phil B wrote:

> I would expect that it does indeed have a switching converter to step
> the 6 volts from the 4 AA cells down to say 1 volt or so at higher
> current.

Perhaps the four AA cells are simply connected in parallel, not series.
Lots cheaper. More efficient, too.

Bill Jeffrey

Buck Frobisher

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Jan 5, 2005, 11:07:44 AM1/5/05
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"Bill Turner" <dial...@webtv.net> wrote in message
news:6852-41D...@storefull-3251.bay.webtv.net...

> I HAVE BEEN CONTEMPLATING PURCHASE, BUT NOT FOR THE SOLDERING EQUIPMENT.
> THE STRIPPER SOLD WITH IT ON CABLE LOOKS GOOD.

You just want the stripper? Do you have room for another person in your
place, Bill??

--
"Stay calm. Be brave. Wait for the signs."

regards,

Frank Johansen
Aurora, Ontario


Bill Turner

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Jan 5, 2005, 2:36:48 PM1/5/05
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I STILL HAVE A 4" X 2' SPACE IN THE GARAGE.

w9gb

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Jan 5, 2005, 5:02:30 PM1/5/05
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From the Radio Shack instructions .. and this tells you what you need to know
(its not a great solution for all needs)
 

* We recommend that you replace the batteries after approximately 750 joints to maintain high performance for your tool.

* The tool is intended for hobby use in electrical projects with medium-sized components, such as wiring, jewelry repairs, and larger printed circuit boards and components. We do NOT recommend it for soldering temperature-sensitive or very small electronic components.

* For best results, use solder of 18 AWG (0.040 in. diameter) to 20 AWG (0.032 in. diameter).

John Stewart

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Jan 5, 2005, 5:15:33 PM1/5/05
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peterB wrote:

The battery operated soldering tool I used ran off a 6 or 12 volt
automotive battery. But that was 50 years ago!! The tip was a carbon rod if
I remember correctly. It got hot since the return lead was hooked onto the
other side of the battery.

It would solder damn near anything. But sure not recommended for
electronics, big or small. Cheers,
John Stewart

R Oxley

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Jan 5, 2005, 9:42:26 PM1/5/05
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"Stephanie Weil" <sv...@home3.gordsven.com> wrote in message
news:slrnctnvc...@home3.gordsven.com...

It is indeed a Wahl. I own one. It is very nice, but it is getting difficult
to find the resistive tips locally anymore. I just discovered that those
dweebs at Fry's stopped selling the irons and the tips and replacement
batteries. They are still available at many places on-line for about $50,
including many size tips at about $5 each. These show up on Ebay also, from
time to time. Do a Google search on Wahl Soldering Iron and you will see
many listings. I plan to buy about $100 worth of extra tips and put them
aside for the future. I like the iron, but I'm wary of how much longer the
parts are going to be available.

There are a few slightly different models, for different prices. One takes
several hours to charge, another charges in about 20 minutes, and so forth.
Of course, the quicker the charging rate, the higher the price!

I also own a propane soldering iron, pocket size. It has three sizes of
soldering tips, a blowtorch tip, and a hot air tip for shrink tubing. I
bought this when I bought a very used cab over camper years ago, and needed
a way to do the rewiring without a source of 120VAC. This worked very well
indeed. The tips for these are still available at my local Fry's, and at Rat
Shack, but that may also change soon. I need to buy some extras of those as
well.

Bob


w9gb

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Jan 6, 2005, 8:17:25 AM1/6/05
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"R Oxley" <tychou...@SPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
news:4A1Dd.21975$CH5.16546@fed1read01...
Wahl is based in Sterling, IL ... about 100 miles straight west of Chicago.
I see that Wahl Electronics is still producing a number of soldering irons
and parts.
http://www.iso-tip.com/html/soldering_irons.htm

gb


william_b_noble

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Jan 7, 2005, 2:03:50 AM1/7/05
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I have one of those wahl irons here, I bought it in the 70s when I was doing
a lot of alarm installations - no need to drag an extension cord through an
attic of a giant mansion.... if anyone is interested in it, I have the
instructions, etc that came with it - contact me and make me some kind of
obcenely high offer and it's yours :)

my email address is on my web page, www.wbnoble.com, responding to this
message won't work

bill

"R Oxley" <tychou...@SPAMyahoo.com> wrote in message
news:4A1Dd.21975$CH5.16546@fed1read01...
>

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