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Hurricane AM Transmitter

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pf...@aol.com

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Jan 2, 2023, 10:09:58 AM1/2/23
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https://www.6v6.co.uk/vcomp/pages/hurricane.htm

The kids (grown and with kids of their own) gave me one-of-the-above for Christmas. First (and preliminary) report:

Although I asked only for the basic model, I received the blue-tooth enabled version. And, as I am a fan of, and keep two SSTRAN AMT (3000 and 5000) devices, those are my points-of-comparison.

Set-up: The Hurricane has a front panel menu with function and step-up/down buttons. The AMTs require frequency settings on internal SIP switches. Advantage: Hurricane.

Gain: The Hurricane has a bar-graph for gain. The AMT is 'ear'. Advantage: Hurricane.

Modulation: Again, the Hurricane has a modulation bar-graph, but unlike the AMT, modulation is not controllable. Advantage: Neutral.

Compression: The AMTs have a compression control. Advantage: AMT.

In operation - and only in a preliminary set-up: Both have very nearly the same range, and both are very clean within that range. Not a trace of hum with either. However, the Hurricane is blue-tooth enabled - advantage Hurricane.

The Hurricane came fully assembled, I had (back in the day) to assemble the AMTs. I see no particular advantage to either conditions.

Size: The Hurricane is about 1/2 the volume of the 3000, and 1/4 the volume of the 5000. However, the 5000 will accept many antenna configurations. Apparently, the Hurricane will as well - so when I get to my outdoor antenna, I will see if that is true.

Guys and gals: Here is a viable, fully frequency-agile AM transmitter that is NOT from the Pacific rim, is well made and works right out of the box at a reasonable price.

Peter Wieck
Melrose Park, PA

Michael Trew

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Jan 3, 2023, 12:11:49 PM1/3/23
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On 1/2/2023 10:09, pf...@aol.com wrote:
> https://www.6v6.co.uk/vcomp/pages/hurricane.htm
>
> The kids (grown and with kids of their own) gave me one-of-the-above
> for Christmas. First (and preliminary) report:
>
> Although I asked only for the basic model, I received the blue-tooth
> enabled version. (snip) Guys and gals: Here is a viable, fully
> frequency-agile AM transmitter that is NOT from the Pacific rim, is
> well made and works right out of the box at a reasonable price.
>
> Peter Wieck Melrose Park, PA

Very nifty, thanks for sharing. "Making my own" AM radio station is
something that would have been quite a hobby for me several years ago.
I might have to look into these.

What is the wattage/range on the transmitter, and is it within FCC
limits? If not, I'm sure it could be adjusted down.

pf...@aol.com

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Jan 3, 2023, 2:44:44 PM1/3/23
to
> What is the wattage/range on the transmitter, and is it within FCC
> limits? If not, I'm sure it could be adjusted down.

Compliant with FCC Part 15 rules. (US Only)

From the product information.

Terry Schwartz

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Jan 3, 2023, 7:24:34 PM1/3/23
to
No doubt "compliant" with the supplied antenna. Add an antenna with some gain, and, well.....

pf...@aol.com

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Jan 4, 2023, 1:10:15 PM1/4/23
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Further research shows it to be 100 mW (LPAM) maximum output. The same as the SSTRAN units. The difference is that I do not know whether it is adjustable as with the SSTRAN units. I will check on that. That does not change the fact that an (unapproved) antenna may well extend the range.

Jim Mueller

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Jan 5, 2023, 9:43:52 PM1/5/23
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The FCC rule is 100mW INPUT, not output. So the output will be more like
50mW, 80 at best. Also, the maximum allowed length of the antenna PLUS
ground is 10 feet.



--
Jim Mueller wron...@nospam.com

To get my real email address, replace wrongname with eggmen.
Then replace nospam with expressmail. Lastly, replace com with dk.

Guy Patterson

unread,
Jan 23, 2023, 10:42:09 AM1/23/23
to
On Thursday, January 5, 2023 at 9:43:52 PM UTC-5, Jim Mueller wrote:
> On Wed, 04 Jan 2023 10:10:14 -0800, pf...@aol.com wrote:
>
> > Further research shows it to be 100 mW (LPAM) maximum output. The same
> > as the SSTRAN units. The difference is that I do not know whether it is
> > adjustable as with the SSTRAN units. I will check on that. That does
> > not change the fact that an (unapproved) antenna may well extend the
> > range.
> >
> > Peter Wieck Melrose Park, PA
> The FCC rule is 100mW INPUT, not output. So the output will be more like
> 50mW, 80 at best. Also, the maximum allowed length of the antenna PLUS
> ground is 10 feet.
>
>
>
> --
> Jim Mueller wron...@nospam.com
>

I don't understand the ground length. If the transmitter is 10' away from a ground rod or cold water pipe, does that mean an antenna can't legally be used? What if the third prong of the AC socket is used, do we have to consider the distance from the socket to the AC panel's ground?

pf...@aol.com

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Jan 24, 2023, 1:10:14 PM1/24/23
to
I will intuit an answer here. In the original SSTRAN literature, the antenna came with a "counterpoise" that when run along the ground became part of the total antenna length, as it was not actually grounded. In their Base-Loaded antenna instructions, a true ground had to be provided,. so the 'counterpoise' was not part of that developed length, the entirety could be dedicated to the antenna. Keep in mind that when I set up just such an antenna overseas, its base was 10 meters up, and I ran #6 solid copper to a 12' ground rod - 12' because that put it in ground water. The antenna itself was trimmed to the appropriate length for the chosen frequency. It covered 80 acres nicely, but for the stucco-on-mesh houses which were pretty effective Faraday cages.

So, Antenna + Counterpoise may not exceed the Part-15 compliant length. Antenna + Ground, one may ignore the ground as by its very nature, it will be many feet/inches/meters longer than the antenna in very nearly every case.

Jim Mueller

unread,
Jan 24, 2023, 9:12:25 PM1/24/23
to
Here is a link to some comments from the FCC about Part 15 transmitters:
https://transition.fcc.gov/Bureaus/Engineering_Technology/Documents/
bulletins/oet63/oet63rev.pdf. Unfortunately they don't mention the
questions raised here and I can't find the Part 15 rules themselves.
Perhaps someone else knows where they are.

ohg...@gmail.com

unread,
Jan 25, 2023, 12:36:01 PM1/25/23
to
Thanks Jim, I've read that in other places but it seems there's no explanation to be had regarding exactly what constitutes the ground length.

Peter, 80 acres is amazing for a part 15 transmitter.



pf...@aol.com

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Jan 26, 2023, 8:20:02 AM1/26/23
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> Thanks Jim, I've read that in other places but it seems there's no explanation to be had regarding exactly what constitutes the ground length.
>
> Peter, 80 acres is amazing for a part 15 transmitter.

All:

Think it through.
a) A counterpoise (the black wire from an SSTRAN transmitter as an example) has a length, and so counts against the total developed length of the transmitter antenna.
b) A ground is, by definition, either infinitely long, or infinitely short - as it absorbs stray current from any source. If I am on the second floor of our house in my 'radio room', the ground has to go some 60' before it actually gets to the ground rod. If I am on the 20th floor of an apartment building, it may have to go some 200 feet or more. Or if I am in my back yard, it may be matter of inches,.

If a "Ground" serves its purpose, it is infinitely short - and so the entire length available may be dedicated to the actual antenna. If it does not, it becomes a counterpoise, and so must be calculated.

80 acres was with the base-loaded SSTRAN-designed antenna. http://www.sstran.com/pages/sstran_buildant.html A few hours work, but very good results.
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