pygotham follow up

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Jonah

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Sep 21, 2011, 12:51:29 AM9/21/11
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Hi,

I attended the pystar talk last friday at pygotham and I really enjoyed it. I apologize for missing the name of the presenter, but thanks for sharing!

Can someone please direct me to the pystar curriculum that was described at the talk? I am not sure I am looking in the correct place.

We have a new part-timer starting soon and I was thinking of using this material as a starting point for their introduction to django. (We will submit any suggestions we have along the way).

Also, you talked about wanting to find some exercises that are more programmy for the syllabus.  I wanted to share with you these exercises, which I still remember vividly from my first CS class:

http://www.cs.princeton.edu/courses/archive/fall10/cos126/assignments.php

One thing that was fabulous about this intro class was that it was like a survey of CS, and each assignment was drawn from another area of cs.

I think an exercise like this might translate really well:

http://www.cs.princeton.edu/courses/archive/fall10/cos126/assignments/sierpinski.html (I think I can also dig up a variation for generating mandelbrot sets too).

I can't personally commit to porting this exercise to python, but I am interested in talking this idea through, and possibly following up.
 
When I took this class, we didn't rely on a graphics toolkit.  We actually wrote a C program that output the simplest postscript (which was basically logo/turtle commands), and loaded that output in ghostscript or actually printed it.  The graphical feedback was very, very satisfying.  Looking back, I also realize how powerful it was early on, to be writing programs which generated other programs.  There are many analogies to the insanity of web development here.

Anyway, recursion is a bit advanced, but is definitely programmy. Code generating code is too (though, admittedly this introduces a few more moving parts.  Alternatively/additionally, PIL could work here too). And an excercise with a pretty graphical output, and one that encourages for (bounded) creative/artistic input could be a nice addition to the syllabus.

Does this sound interesting?

all the best,
/Jonah

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