Ludic pedagogy article

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Lisa Kath

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Mar 10, 2021, 12:58:56 PMMar 10
to Professors at Play
Hi everyone,
A friend of mine forwarded me this article and said it sounded like my style. I was flattered, told her about our great Professors at Play group, and wanted to share the article with you all:


They did mention a term I hadn't heard before: ludic pedagogy. Fancy talk for those who need some gravitas for their review/tenure/reappointment materials!

They also have links to some primary source articles, which might be of help to some of you.

take care and have a great day,
Lisa

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Lisa M. Kath, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Psychology at San Diego State University
Email Lisa...@sdsu.edu 
Website lisakath.com
Schedule a meeting calendly.com/lkath
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Maha Bali

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Mar 10, 2021, 10:58:01 PMMar 10
to Lisa Kath, Professors at Play
Thanks for sharing.

My gut reaction is they should have said the "don't take yourself/course too seriously" first. I don't know that profs who are normally v formal and serious can follow advice such as this. Do you? I do think young profs who are deep down playful will feel they have permission to be themselves in class.

But honestly, the very serious ones, they wouldn't be comfortable or authentic doing this. I may be wrong. Tell me what you think!



I hope you and your loved ones are safe and well.

Maha

Maha Bali, PhD
Associate Professor of Practice, Center for Learning and Teaching, American University in Cairo
http://blog.mahabali.me
** Have you seen these community building resources we have been curating? https://oneheglobal.org/equity-unbound **


   

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Lisa Kath

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Mar 11, 2021, 10:19:16 AMMar 11
to Maha Bali, Professors at Play
I agree that this article (or really, ANY article) wouldn't be enough to get more serious/formal professors to be more playful in the classroom. And I'm not sure that it is good to even hold the idea that being playful is necessarily superior to other teaching styles (not that I'm saying you do... I'm just thinking "aloud"), because of the word you used: authentic. I'm authentically a little goofy, and when I bring that into my classrooms, I'm being more authentic, and students notice that. But if someone more formal tried to do what I do, it would probably fall flat, because it's not their true selves.

Just like you said, this article (and especially this group) paves the way for those of us already inclined to be playful in the classroom. 

My concern, which has been heightened during this pandemic, is that the more formal professors might also be the ones inclined toward harsh and unforgiving policies that do more harm to underrepresented groups than their majority peers. I wonder if there is any relationship between playfulness and kindness. I will state for the record that I know plenty of professors who are more formal and also very kind. 

Anyway, now I'm *really* rambling, so I'll leave it here. Happy to hear others' thoughts on this.

best wishes to you all,
Lisa


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Lisa M. Kath, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Psychology at San Diego State University
Email Lisa...@sdsu.edu 
Website lisakath.com
Schedule a meeting calendly.com/lkath
Pronouns she/her/hers
Bonus title Associate Editor - Occupational Health Science
Check out @iopsychmemes (last three icons below)
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David Thomas

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Mar 11, 2021, 11:23:44 AMMar 11
to Professors at Play
I like where this discussion is going. 

The article itself seems useful to me as a broad overview of some of the reason teachers should consider a more playful approach to pedagogy. What I think it misses it that approach can appear in a lot of different guises and formats. I don't expect a prof who feels that their position or personality doesn't fit with a goofy style to suddenly go all wacky. At the same time, the playfulness that brings us all here comes in many forms. You can find ways to be playful or encourage play in your classes even if you don't feel free to be playful. That makes sense when you think of play as looseness, of shared meaning making, of community building, of engagement.

I'd say it's the difference between people that like chess and those that like shooter videogames or like hopscotch. Sometimes they are the same person, sometimes they are different people. But no matter what, they are different styles of play. 

That is, I think it's important to realize that play, in its many forms, offers a lot of options for teachers. And we shoud all find our authentic play to bring to our classes.  Crazy Hawallian shirts not required!

David

Helene Brazier-Mitouart

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Mar 11, 2021, 11:41:28 AMMar 11
to David Thomas, Professors at Play

Dear Everyone,

 

I am really so glad to have you all! Sometimes, I was feeling a bit lonely to be playful in my classes and to be allowing students and participants to my trainings, to explore playfulness in their learning experience. I really think playfulness offers a sandbox for students to explore, make mistakes, learn and have fun along the way.

We offer them a place of exploration and vulnerability, where we also demonstrate empathy and where we are here to support their learning experience.

But then, we need students to have master the material, skills and knowledge.

The transition to grading students is where I feel that playfulness is more difficult for us teachers and professors, to integrate. And should it even be integrated?

This is where a lot of my thoughts have been going.

To validate curriculum, we need some grades to enter into the university/college system. Because we need to be sure and demonstrate that students have reached a specific level of learning and understanding.

I would love some insights on that topic.

 

Thanks in advanced for your time and suggestions,

 

Looking forward to hearing from you,

 

Warm Regards

 

Helene Brazier-Mitouart, PhD

Education Manager

Weill Cornell Medicine

Office of Education and Training In Research Administration (ETRA)

Research Operations

New York, NY 10022

646-962-6204

Heb...@med.cornell.edu

 

E2RA Summer 2021 starts next week!

If you are interested or want to share with your colleagues: E2RA Info available here https://research.weill.cornell.edu/wcm-investigators/professional-development-mentoring/e2ra-course

And people can register here https://weillcornell.az1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bKKxXWkkGK4xag6

Crook-Lockwood, Sheila

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Mar 11, 2021, 11:48:50 AMMar 11
to David Thomas, Professors at Play

David, excellent insights.

Thanks for sharing,

Sheila

 

 

Sheila Crook-Lockwood MSN-Ed, RN, CNE, Faith Community Nurse

Associate Professor of Nursing, UIU RN-BSN

1641 Boyson Square Dr. , Suite 100

Hiawatha, IA 52233

Cell and work: 319-389-7662

crooklo...@uiu.edu

 

 

 

 

From: professor...@googlegroups.com <professor...@googlegroups.com> On Behalf Of David Thomas
Sent: Thursday, March 11, 2021 10:23 AM
To: Professors at Play <professor...@googlegroups.com>

Subject: Re: Ludic pedagogy article

 

WARNING: This email originated from outside of Upper Iowa University. Do not click links or open attachments unless you were expecting the attachment(s) and know the content is safe.

I like where this discussion is going. 

 

The article itself seems useful to me as a broad overview of some of the reason teachers should consider a more playful approach to pedagogy. What I think it misses it that approach can appear in a lot of different guises and formats. I don't expect a prof who feels that their position or personality doesn't fit with a goofy style to suddenly go all wacky. At the same time, the playfulness that brings us all here comes in many forms. You can find ways to be playful or encourage play in your classes even if you don't feel free to be playful. That makes sense when you think of play as looseness, of shared meaning making, of community building, of engagement.

 

I'd say it's the difference between people that like chess and those that like shooter videogames or like hopscotch. Sometimes they are the same person, sometimes they are different people. But no matter what, they are different styles of play. 

 

That is, I think it's important to realize that play, in its many forms, offers a lot of options for teachers. And we shoud all find our authentic play to bring to our classes.  Crazy Hawallian shirts not required!


David

 

On Thu, Mar 11, 2021 at 8:19 AM Lisa Kath <lisa...@sdsu.edu> wrote:

I agree that this article (or really, ANY article) wouldn't be enough to get more serious/formal professors to be more playful in the classroom. And I'm not sure that it is good to even hold the idea that being playful is necessarily superior to other teaching styles (not that I'm saying you do... I'm just thinking "aloud"), because of the word you used: authentic. I'm authentically a little goofy, and when I bring that into my classrooms, I'm being more authentic, and students notice that. But if someone more formal tried to do what I do, it would probably fall flat, because it's not their true selves.

 

Just like you said, this article (and especially this group) paves the way for those of us already inclined to be playful in the classroom. 

 

My concern, which has been heightened during this pandemic, is that the more formal professors might also be the ones inclined toward harsh and unforgiving policies that do more harm to underrepresented groups than their majority peers. I wonder if there is any relationship between playfulness and kindness. I will state for the record that I know plenty of professors who are more formal and also very kind. 

 

Anyway, now I'm *really* rambling, so I'll leave it here. Happy to hear others' thoughts on this.

 

best wishes to you all,

Lisa

 

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Lisa M. Kath, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Psychology at San Diego State University

Email Lisa...@sdsu.edu 

Website lisakath.com

Schedule a meeting calendly.com/lkath

Pronouns she/her/hers

Bonus title Associate Editor - Occupational Health Science

Check out @iopsychmemes (last three icons below)

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On Wed, Mar 10, 2021 at 7:58 PM 'Maha Bali' via Professors at Play <professor...@googlegroups.com> wrote:

Thanks for sharing.

 

My gut reaction is they should have said the "don't take yourself/course too seriously" first. I don't know that profs who are normally v formal and serious can follow advice such as this. Do you? I do think young profs who are deep down playful will feel they have permission to be themselves in class.

 

But honestly, the very serious ones, they wouldn't be comfortable or authentic doing this. I may be wrong. Tell me what you think!



I hope you and your loved ones are safe and well.

Maha

Maha Bali, PhD
Associate Professor of Practice, Center for Learning and Teaching, American University in Cairo
http://blog.mahabali.me
** Have you seen these community building resources we have been curating? https://oneheglobal.org/equity-unbound **


   

 

On Wed, Mar 10, 2021, 7:58 PM Lisa Kath <lisa...@sdsu.edu> wrote:

Hi everyone,

A friend of mine forwarded me this article and said it sounded like my style. I was flattered, told her about our great Professors at Play group, and wanted to share the article with you all:

 

 

They did mention a term I hadn't heard before: ludic pedagogy. Fancy talk for those who need some gravitas for their review/tenure/reappointment materials!

 

They also have links to some primary source articles, which might be of help to some of you.

 

take care and have a great day,

Lisa

Image removed by sender. photo

Lisa M. Kath, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Psychology at San Diego State University

Email Lisa...@sdsu.edu 

Website lisakath.com

Schedule a meeting calendly.com/lkath

Pronouns she/her/hers

Bonus title Associate Editor - Occupational Health Science

Check out @iopsychmemes (last three icons below)

Image removed by sender.

Image removed by sender.

Image removed by sender.

Image removed by sender.

Image removed by sender.

 

Image removed by sender. App Banner Image

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Lisa Kath

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Mar 11, 2021, 11:52:52 AMMar 11
to Helene Brazier-Mitouart, David Thomas, Professors at Play
These are great questions, Helene! I know ALMOST NOTHING about this concept of "ungrading," except that I have a kid who is a freshman at our local community college, and one of the classes is ungraded.

But a quick Google search led me to these possible entryways to this strange new world of ungrading:

If anyone in the group has tried it, I'd be interested to learn more. In particular, based on my quick scan, I'm not sure how scalable this is, and I teach classes that have up to 250 students at a time (although I do have TA help, thank goodness!).

best wishes,
Lisa


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Lisa M. Kath, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Psychology at San Diego State University
Email Lisa...@sdsu.edu 
Website lisakath.com
Schedule a meeting calendly.com/lkath
Pronouns she/her/hers
Bonus title Associate Editor - Occupational Health Science
Check out @iopsychmemes (last three icons below)
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Maha Bali

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Mar 11, 2021, 3:19:17 PMMar 11
to Lisa Kath, Helene Brazier-Mitouart, David Thomas, Professors at Play
Hi everyone

I am one of the ppl cited in the Inside Higher Ed article 😂 on Ungrading and Susan Blum has a book entitled Ungrading which is a collection from many ppl in the US. Many in K-12 do it (check Hacking Assessment by Starr Sackstein and work of Alfie Kohn). I do self-grading mainly.

I recently facilitated a conversation w several folks on how they do alternative approaches to grading. Here is the video and additional resources including podcasts (2-part interview w Jesse Stommel, Asao Inoue and myself):

Long story short: so many diff ways to do it, depending on your institutional constraints, students' cultures, etc.

The Inside Higher Ed article is good... I would start w the podcast or video to get a broad view.

Susan Blum was also recently on Teaching in Higher Ed w Bonni Stachowiak:

I hope this helps!

I can answer more specific questions 

Helene Brazier-Mitouart

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Mar 11, 2021, 3:48:15 PMMar 11
to Maha Bali, Lisa Kath, David Thomas, Professors at Play

Thanks a lot for these resources Lisa and Maha.

I will read and listen to them, and I am sure I will find some inspiration there!

I am so grateful for your sharing your wisdom and knowledge !

Will definitely get back to you with questions 😉

 

Warm Regards

 

Helene Brazier-Mitouart, PhD

Education Manager

Weill Cornell Medicine

Office of Education and Training In Research Administration (ETRA)

 

T. Keith Edmunds

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May 4, 2021, 3:08:00 PMMay 4
to Professors at Play
I'm very late to the conversation, and for that I'm sorry!  As one of the authors of the article in question, I can say we very pleased with the overall reaction to it.  Some of the points raised here are well-taken -- particularly those about authenticity and the highly variable means by which the ideas of Ludic Pedagogy can be implemented.  Both are absolutely on the mark, and we agree with both.

Our key concern is the dismissive attitude the Academy has, generally speaking, towards the ideas of play and playfulness and fun and humour.  It is our goal to try and drive these more into the mainstream.  One can be a serious academic and still have fun doing it!

I am tickled to find this group and hope to interact with you all much more in the weeks and months to come.

-Keith-

Dr. T. Keith Edmunds
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