a Biocomputer Metaprogram for Buddhist meditation

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Terrence Brannon

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Apr 13, 2008, 1:25:54 PM4/13/08
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Buddhist meditation instructions:
1. count the breath
2. if you get to 10, go back to 1
3. if a thought arises, ignore it

I spent most of this weekend failing on this practice because I thought
I was only capable of running one program at a time --- the breath
counting program.

Because of this ignorance, I was getting waylaid when a thought arose.
So what i did was i setup three programs in my brain, 1 for each task
and then sat back and ran it! Cool! Improved results!!!

--
Non-linear floating words - http://groups.google.com/group/odd-musings
Ambient floating blog - http://ohfloat.com
Floating jottit - http://floating.jottit.com

Kanefire

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Apr 16, 2008, 2:35:09 AM4/16/08
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you know what else is cool.

Tell your mind to do something with authority and watch what happens.
Like; Say I love life 10x.
Or send love to every cell in my body ...right...now.
Say Humpty Dumpty 20x

Like a little machine running a program.

Terrence Brannon

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Apr 16, 2008, 6:40:00 AM4/16/08
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yes, I might try that some time... subconscious programs are doing that
to my body all the time anyway, sometimes in self-defeating circuits.

but the big win is PARALLELISM. You dont have to just send one program.
You can send multiples in parallel.

--

Non-linear floating words - http://groups.google.com/group/odd-musings
Ambient floating blog - http://ohfloat.com

Floating mindmap - http://static.livingcosmos.org/super-scio/floating/
The mothership - http://www.LivingCosmos.org

The Quiet Center

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May 11, 2008, 10:00:47 AM5/11/08
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On Apr 16, 2:35 am, Kanefire <floatmatri...@gmail.com> wrote:
> you know what else is cool.
>
> Tell your mind to do something with authority and watch what happens.
> Like; Say I love life 10x.
> Or send love to every cell in my body ...right...now.

a counter-program rears its head: "that cant be done" "what a waste of
time" "i'm just the same as I was before that silly idea"

The Quiet Center

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May 11, 2008, 10:05:38 AM5/11/08
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On Apr 13, 1:25 pm, Terrence Brannon <metaperl.hit...@gmail.com>
wrote:
> Buddhist meditation instructions:

The instructions are given here -
http://www.mro.org/zmm/teachings/meditation.php

> 1. count the breath
> 2. if you get to 10, go back to 1
> 3. if a thought arises, ignore it
>
There are actually 2 programs:
1 -- one watches the hara and counts the breath, going back to 1 when
it reaches 10
2 - another watches incoming thoughts and lets them go

What I am noticing as I do this is that *I* get involved with program
#2. I take it over and reflect worry complain dramatize, etc. So the
goal for *me* in this programming drill is to just watch both
programs....

I like this much better than how the instructions are presented at
that Zen monastery. Those instructions make a human being seem like a
sequential monolithic machine - only able to carry about a single
instruction of watching the breath until you are blindsided by a
thought. The instructions above, inspired by Lilly's book (or actually
Ronin's interpretation Lilly's book) "Programming the Human
Biocomputer" embrace the parallel power of the human being.

Also, it shows me where my weakness is. It is not in counting. It is
in getting entangled in thoughts. Just like "The Abundance Matrix"
text says.

Kanefire

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May 12, 2008, 2:31:16 PM5/12/08
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Another big part to the meditation is keeping awareness on the Lower
Tan Tien (hara, just below navel).
With your awareness here, It actively occupies loose resources. This
is an infinitely deep aspect to the meditation
as you never reach a "static awareness" because you can always
sensitize more and more.

I did this this morning. It took me a whole hour to get from 1 to 10
and back to 1.
I would get to 3 or 4 or 8 and then would go elsewhere.
Once I got to ten, going back was easy.

I like the "who am I" meditation. In which I move to simple awareness
of being.
To do this, I simply recognize that I can't be anything that I think
or feel, because this requires objectification and therefore
separation. So anytime a thought or feeling arises, I find that they
usually revolve around the ego attempting to create a self-image as
the meditation itself is the process of dissolving this self-image so
these old program surface easily. When I become adept at this, I
remain in the awareness throughout the day much easier. I find that
the zazen is good for concentration, but since my experience is rooted
in awareness of being, I easily lose the benefits of the zazen as I
begin to identify with things as my day moves forward.
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