AAAI 84 schedule

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Below is the schedule for AAAI 84 gotten off the arpanet.

-Liz Allen

Univ of Maryland, College Park MD
Usenet: ...!seismo!umcp-cs!liz
Arpanet: liz@maryland

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A A A I 8 4 C O N F E R E N C E P R O G R A M

GENERAL INFORMATION
===================

Registration The conference registration desk will be located
in the Childress Room at the Villa Capri Motel and will
and be open during the following hours:

Information Sunday, August 5, 1984 - 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
Monday, August 6, 1984 - 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday, August 7, 1984 - 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday, August 8, 1984 - 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Thursday, August 9, 1984 - 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Friday, August 10, 1984 - closed

AAAI staff members will be in the Childress Room
to provide assistance and answer attendees' questions.
Guides from the University of Texas will give
directions in the Performing Arts Center and Music
Building.


Conference Each registrant for the technical program will receive
Proceedings in his/her conference portfolio a ticket for one
copy of the conference proceedings. The ticket
may be redeemed at the William Kaufmann booth
(same hours as conference registration) in the
Childress Room at the Villa Capri Motel.
Extra proceedings may be purchased at that same
location. IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN BUYING
EXTRA COPIES OF THE PROCEEDINGS OR AI MAGAZINES,
THE LAST DAY TO BUY THEM WILL BE THURSDAY, AUGUST
9, 1984.

Message Center If you need to receive a call in the Performing Arts
Center, the telephone number is (512) 471-4511.
Pick up your messages in the lobby of the
Concert Hall Messages may also be received
at the Jester Center Telephone number (512) 471-3944.
Public phones are located in the Concert
Hall, Music Building and Thompson Conference Center.

Messages Messages and announcements about meetings not listed
and in the conference program will be posted on bulletin
Announcements boards opposite the Lobby of the Concert Hall.
Please check the board periodically.
We hope to have a terminal available in
the Lobby of the Concert Hall for conference attendees
to communicate through the ARPANET.

Admission to Each conference attendee will receive a name badge(s)
Session upon registering. You will not be admitted to the
technical, tutorial, or exhibit programs without
your badge.

Smoking and No smoking or eating is allowed in the session or
Eating tutorial rooms in the Performing Arts Center and
Music Building. No smoking will be allowed in the
Exhibit area (Scene Shop) of the Performing Arts
Center. However, smoking and drinking in the lobbies
is allowed.

Coffee Breaks The times of the breaks will vary daily. The location
of the technical session breaks (for Tuesday and
Wednesday only) will be the
Concert Hall's mezzanine level
and the lobby of the Opera
Lab Theatre. For Thursday and Friday, the location
of the breaks will be the mezzanine level of the
Concert Hall.The locations of the tutorial breaks
will be the LBJ Auditorium Lobby and the
Thompson Conference Center's patio.

Dining Concession booth where you can buy lunches
will be located on the mezzanine level
and third level of
the Performing Arts Center.
The cafeteria in Thompson Conference Center will
be open for breakfast (7:30 to 9:00 a.m.),
lunch (11:45 a.m. to 1:45 p.m.) and for snacks
(2:00 to 4:00 p.m.). The College of Fine
Arts Lounge will be open for snacks and lunch.

List of A list of individuals who preregistered
Attendees for the conference will be available at the Information
desk in the Childress Room.

Press All members of the press are requested to check in
in the Opera Lab Theatre's Green Room.

R&D Exhibits A selection of commercial and nonprofit
firms will provide information about
their products and services. The exhibit
program is located in the Scene Shop in
the Performing Arts Center.

Handicapped Facilities Wheelchair seating is available in all of
the College and PAC facilities.

Parking Parking is available in the lots directly
east of the LBJ Library and Sid Richardson Hall
(access via Red River St.) and in the lots along
Manor Road and East Campus Drive, directly east of
Memorial Stadium.

Special Facilities We have reserved the Concert Hall Green Room for
informal conversation and discussion. Please
take advantage of this very comfortable, relaxing
setting. In addition to this room, small meeting
rooms are available. Please go to the Information
Desk at the Villa Capri Motel to reserve those rooms.


-2-

SPECIAL MEETINGS AND SERVICES
=============================


AAAI Business Meeting

The annual AAAI business meeting will occur on Thursday, August 8 at
12:15 p.m. in the Concert Hall. Dr. John McCarthy, President for
1983-84, will introduce new President, Dr. Woodrow Bledsoe, and
discuss AAAI program activities.

AI in Medicine Meeting (AIM)

The AAAI's special interest group in artificial intelligence, chaired
by Peter _________, will occur on __________________________at ________.

SIGART Meeting

ACM's Special Interest Group in Artificial Intelligence(SIGART) will
hold its annual meeting on Wednesday, August 8 at 12:30 p.m. in the
Recital Studio in the Music Building.


-3-

About AAAI
==========

American AAAI is the scientific society for the
Association Artificial Intelligence community in the
for United States. It sponsors or co-sponsors
Artificial annual AI conferences in this country and
Intelligence abroad and produces the AI Magazine.
------------
Its membership includes representatives
from academia, commerce, industry and
government. AAAI members receive:

* Affiliation with the principal
association in the field of
Artificial Intelligence.
* A subscription to the AI Magazine.
* A reduced registration fee for
AAAI conferences.
* A reduced subscription rate to Artificial
Intelligence.
* Early announcements of AAAI-sponsored
activities.


Officers President (1983-1984):
John McCarthy, Stanford University
President-elect (1984-1985):
Woodrow Bledsoe, University of Texas at Austin
and MCC
Secretary-Treasurer:
Richard Fikes, IntelliCorp Inc.
Executive Director:
Claudia C. Mazzetti

Executive
Council [ see list from brochure ]


Staff and Claudia C. Mazzetti, Executive Director
Location Kathy Kelly, Secretary/Membership Coordinator

AAAI
445 Burgess Drive
Menlo Park, CA 94025

AAAI Past Nils Nilsson, SRI International (1982-83)
Presidents Marvin Minsky, Massachusetts Institute
of Technology (1981-1982)
Edward Feigenbaum, Stanford University (1980-1981)
Allan Newell, Carnegie-Mellon University (1979-1980)

-4-

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
================


AAAI especially wants to thank the members of this year's Program
Committee and additional reviewers who assisted the members of the Program
Committee in reviewing the three hundred seventy (370) submitted papers. We
also extend our appreciation to the individuals who suggested ideas
for the program. The AAAI also expresses its deepest appreciation for the
extra help provided by Al Davis, Richard Fikes, Kathy Kelly,Hector Levesque,
Sunny Olds, and Peter Patel-Schneider.


Program Ronald J. Brachman
Chair Fairchild Laboratory for Artificial Intelligence
Research
4001 Miranda Avenue
Palo Alto, CA 94304

Program Kenneth Bowen
Committee School of Computer and Information Science
313 Link Hall
Syracuse University
Syracuse, NY 13210

Rodney Brooks
Computer Science Department
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

Jaime G. Carbonell
Computer Science Department
Carnegie-Mellon University
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Richard Fikes
IntelliCorp Inc.
707 Laurel Street
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Michael Genesereth
Computer Science Department
Stanford University
Stanford,CA 94305

Barbara J. Grosz
Artificial Intelligence Center
SRI International
333 Ravenswood Avenue
Menlo Park, CA 94025

-5-


Benjamin Kuipers
Department of Mathematics
Tufts University
Medford, MA 02155

Wendy Lehnert
Department of Computer and Information Sciences
University of Massachusetts
Amherst, MA 01003

Douglas Lenat
Computer Science Department
Stanford University
Stanford, CA 94305

John D. Lowrance
Artificial Intelligence Center
SRI International
333 Ravenswood Street
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Drew McDermott
Computer Science Department
Yale University
New Haven, CT 06520

John McDermott
Computer Science Department
Carnegie-Mellon University
Pittsburgh, PA 15213

Thomas Mitchell
Computer Science Department
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ 08903

John Mylopoulos
Department of Computer Science
10 King's College road
University of Toronto
Toronto, Ontario
Canada M5S 1A4


-6-

Judea Pearl
Department of Computer Science
University of California
Los Angeles, CA 90024

Stan Rosenschein
Artificial Intelligence Center
SRI International
333 Ravenswood Street
Menlo Park, CA 94025

Lenhart K. Schubert
Department of Computing Science
University of Alberta
Edmonton, Alberta
Canada T6G 2H1

Howard Shrobe
Symbolics, Inc.
243 Vassar Street
Cambridge, MA 02139

Mark Stefik
Intelligent Systems Laboratory
Xerox Palo Alto Research Center
3333 Coyote Hill Road
Palo Alto, CA 94304

Albert Stevens
BBN Laboratories
10 Moulton Street
Cambridge, MA 02238

William R. Swartout
USC/ISI
4676 Admiralty Way
Marina del Rey, CA 90291

Peter Szolovits
Laboratory for Computer Science
M.I.T.
545 Technology Sq.
Cambridge, MA 02139

-7-


John K. Tsotsos
Department of Computer Science
10 King's College Road
University of Toronto
Toronto, Ontario
Canada M5S 1A4

Kurt Van Lehn
Xerox Palo Alto Research Center
3333 Coyote Hill Road
Palo Alto, CA 94304

Bonnie Lynn Webber
Department of Computer and Information Sciences
University of Pennsylvania
Philadelphia, PA 19104

Andy Witkin
Fairchild Laboratory of Artificial Intelligence
Research
4001 Miranda Avenue
Palo Alto, CA 94304

Additional Reviewers Doug Appelt
Klaus Berkling
P. Bruce Berra
Robert Bolles
Lee Brownston
Nick J. Cercone
Norman Dalkey
Al Davis
Rina Dechter
Michael Deering
Bruce Delagi
Larry Eshelman
Scott E. Fahlman
David Fleet
Randy Goebel
Neil Goldman
Kevin J. Greene
Peter E. Hart
Paul Horstmann
Allan Jepson
Gary Kahn
Jin Kim
Gary E. Kopec
Hector J. Levesque
Richard F. Lyon
William Mann
Mitchell P. Marcus
Sandra Marcus
Gordon McCalla
David McKeown
Gerard Michon
John L. Mohammed
Robert C. Moore
F. Lockwood Morris
Jack Mostow
Nils Nilsson
-9-
Ramesh S. Patil
Alex Pentland
Fernando Pereira
David Poole
Lynn Quam
Edwina Rissland
Igor Roizen
Ronald L. Rivest
Chuck Seitz
Stuart C. Shapiro
Dick Sites
Mark Stickel
Hans Uszkoreit
Richard Waldinger
David H. D. Warren
David Wile
George Wood




Local Elaine Rich, University of Texas at Austin
Arrangements Gordon Novak and Barbara Smith, University
Chair and of Texas at Austin
Committee David Touretzky, Carnegie-
Mellon University

AAAI Claudia Mazzetti
Kathy Kelly
David Blatner and Maria Gagliardi (part-time
employees).

-10-

TIME SCHEDULE
------------------------------------------------------------------------

MONDAY, AUGUST 6

9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Opening of the R&D Exhibit Program
(same hours every day except Friday)

9:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m. Tutorial No. 1: An Overview of Artificial
Intelligence

2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tutorial No. 2: Applications of AI to Training
and Education

2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tutorial No. 3: Natural Language Processing


TUESDAY, AUGUST 7


9:00 a.m. to 10:40 a.m. Technical Paper Session: AI Architectures and Languages

9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Tutorial No. 4: Building Expert Systems - Part 1:
Fundamentals
9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Tutorial No. 6: LISP Programming

9:25 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Technical Paper Session: Search

9:25 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Technical Paper Session: Knowledge Representation
11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Technical Paper Session:
AI & Education and Automated Reasoning:
Understanding Computer
Programs

2:00 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. Technical Paper Session: Qualitative Reasoning

2:00 a.m. to 4:50 p.m. Technical Paper Session: Speech Recognition and
Natural Language Understanding

2:00 a.m. to 5:15 p.m. Technical Paper Session: Learning

2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tutorial No. 5: Building Expert Systems - Part 2:
Pragmatics

2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Tutorial No. 7: AI Programming Technology

3:35 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. Technical Paper Session:Automated Reasoning
and Knowledge Representation

6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Informal Reception

-11-


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8

9:00 a.m. to 10:40 a.m. Technical Paper Session: Explanation & Natural
Language Generation

9:00 a.m. to 10:40 a.m. Technical Paper Session:
Inexact Reasoning

9:25 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Technical Paper Session: Vision

11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.Technical Paper Session:Cognitive Modeling

11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Panel: The Management of Uncertainty in Intelligent
Systems

12:30 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. ACM/SIGART Business Meeting

2:00 p.m. to 3:35 p.m. Technical Paper Session: Automatic Theorem-Proving

2:00 p.m. to 3:35 p.m. Technical Paper Session: Robotics

2:00 p.m. to 3:35 p.m. Technical Paper Session: Expert Systems

3:35 p.m. to 3:40 p.m. Presentation of the 1984 Publisher's Prize
Awards
3:40 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. Presentation of the 1984 Publisher's Prize Papers

6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Main Conference Reception

7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Panel: Results of the Stanford LISP Timing and
Evaluation Project

THURSDAY, AUGUST 9

8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Last day to buy Conference Proceedings and other
publications at the William Kaufmann Booth in
the Villa Capri Motel

9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Panel: Information Processors as Organizations

10:50 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Welcoming Address by Dr. Gerhard Fonken, Vice
President of Academic Affairs and Research,
University of Texas at Austin

11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. AAAI Presidential Address

12:15 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. AAAI Annual Business Meeting

2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Invited Lecture: A Perspective on Planning

3:20 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Panel: AI in the Marketplace -- Issues in the
Transfer of AI Technology into Products

7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Fiesta Reception at Fiesta Gardens


-12-
FRIDAY, AUGUST 10

9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Tutorial and Panel: Paradigms for Machine Learning

10:50 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Panel: DARPA's Strategic Computing Project:
Challenge and Changes for AI
1:45 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Invited Lecture: An Overview of
Natural Language Generation

2:00 p.m. R & D Exhibit Program Closes

2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Panel: The 'Dark Ages' of AI -- Can We Avoid Them or
Survive Them?

4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Hail and Farewell


-13-

PROGRAM SCHEDULE
================


SUNDAY AFTERNOON
-------------------------------------------------------------

3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONFERENCE REGISTRATION AND CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS
Childress Room in the PICK-UP
Villa Capri Motel

MONDAY MORNING
--------------------------------------------------------------

8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. CONFERENCE REGISTRATION AND CONFERENCE
Childress Room in the PROCEEDINGS PICK-UP
Villa Capri Motel

9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. TUTORIAL NO. 1: AN OVERVIEW OF ARTIFICIAL
Opera Lab Theatre INTELLIGENCE
in the Performing
Arts Center Speakers:
Dr. Marvin Minsky, Massachusetts Institute of
Technology and
Dr. Douglas Lenat, Stanford University
---------------------------------------------------------------------

9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. R & D EXHIBIT PROGRAM OPENS (same hours
Scene & Paint every day except Friday)
Shops in the
Performing Arts
Center

-------------------------------------------------------------------
MONDAY AFTERNOON
---------------------------------------------------------------

2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. TUTORIAL NO. 2: APPLICATIONS TO AI TO
Room 1.110 in TRAINING AND EDUCATION
Thompson Conference
Center Speakers:
Drs. John Seely Brown and Richard Burton,
Xerox Palo Alto Research Center and
Dr. William Clancey, Stanford University

2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m TUTORIAL NO. 3: NATURAL LANGUAGE PROCESSING
Room 2.102 in the
Thompson Conference
Center Speaker:
Dr. Wendy Lehnert, University of Massachusetts


-14-

TUESDAY MORNING
-------------------------------------------------------------------

8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. CONFERENCE REGISTRATION AND CONFERENCE
Childress Room in the PROCEEDINGS PICK-UP
Villa Capri Motel


----------------------------------------------------------------------------

9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. TUTORIAL NO. 4: BUILDING EXPERT SYSTEMS: PART 1-
LBJ Auditorium FUNDAMENTALS

Speakers: Dr. Douglas Lenat, Stanford University
and Dr. John McDermott, Carnegie-Mellon
University

9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. TUTORIAL NO. 6: LISP PROGRAMMING
Room 2.102 in the
Thompson Conference
Center
Speaker: Dr. David Touretzky, Carnegie-Mellon
University

-15-


TUESDAY MORNING
----------------------------------------------------------------------------


9:25 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. TECHNICAL PAPER SESSION: KNOWLEDGE
Bates Recital Hall REPRESENTATION
in the Music
Building

9:25 a.m. to 9:50 a.m. Processing Entailments and Accessing Facts in a
Uniform Frame System
Anthony S. Maida, University of California at
Berkeley and Penn State University
9:50 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. Constraint Equations: A Concise Compilable
Representation for Quantified Relational
Constraints in Semantic Networks
Matthew Morgenstern, USC/ Information Sciences
Institute
10:15 a.m. to 10:40a.m. A Theory of Action for MultiAgent Planning
Michael Georgeff, SRI International

10:40 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Break (go to the Opera Lab Theatre's Lobby)

11:00 a.m. to 11:25 a.m. Very-High-Level Programming of Knowledge
Representation Schemes
Stephen J. Westfold, Stanford University
and Kestrel Institute
11:25 a.m. to 11:50 a.m. Expressiveness of a Language
Jock Mackinlay and Michael R. Genesereth,
Stanford University
11:50 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. A Self-Organizing Retrieval System for
Graphs
Robert Levinson, University of Texas at
Austin


-16-

TUESDAY MORNING
----------------------------------------------------------------
9:25 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. TECHNICAL PAPER SESSION:
Opera Lab Theatre SEARCH
in the Performing Arts
Center

9:25 a.m. to 9:50 a.m. D-Node Retargeting in Bidirectional Heuristic
Search
George Politowski and Ira Pohl, University
of California at Santa Cruz

9:50 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. Towards a Better Understanding of Bidirectional
Search
Henry W. Davis, Randy B. Pollack, and Thomas Sudkamp,
Wright State University

10:15 a.m. to 10:40 a.m. A General Bottom-up Procedure for Searching And/Or
Graphs
Vipin Kumar, University of Texas at Austin
10:40 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Break (go to the Opera Lab Theatre's Lobby)

11:00 a.m. to 11:25 a.m. How to Cope with Anomalies in Parallel Approximate
Branch-and-Bound Algorithms
Guo-jie Li and Benjamin W. Wah, Purdue University
11:25 a.m. to 11:50 a.m. Maintaining Diversity in Genetic Search
Michael L. Mauldin, Carnegie-Mellon University
11:50 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Focusing in Plan Recognition
Norman F. Carver and Victor R. Lesser, University
of Massachusetts; Daniel L. McCue,
Digital Equipment Corporation


-17-


TUESDAY MORNING
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
9:00 a.m. to 10:40 a.m. TECHNICAL PAPER SESSION:
Concert Hall in the AI ARCHITECTURES AND LANGUAGES
Peforming Arts Center

9:00 a.m. to 9:25 a.m. Syntax Programming
Stefan Feyock, College of William and Mary
9:25 a.m. to 9:50 a.m. Five Parallel Algorithms for Production
System Execution for the DADO Machine
Salvatore J. Stolfo, Columbia University
9:50 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. Initial Assessment of Architectures
Production Systems
Charles Forgy, Anoop Gupta, Allen Newell, and Robert
Wedig, Carnegie-Mellon University
10:15 a.m. to 10:40 a.m.Hardware and Software Architectures for Efficient
AI
Michael F. Deering, Fairchild Laboratory for
Artificial Intelligence Research

10:40 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Break ( go to the mezzanine level of the Concert Hall)

-------------------------------------------------------------------

11:00 A.M. To 12:15 p.m. TECHNICAL PAPER SESSION:
Concert Hall AI & EDUCATON AND AUTOMATED REASONING:
in the UNDERSTANDING COMPUTER PROGRAMS
Performing Arts
Center

11:00 a.m. to 11:25 a.m. An Interactive Computer-Based Tutor for LISP
Robert G. Farrell, John R. Anderson, and Brian
J. Reiser, Carnegie-Mellon University
11:25 a.m. to 11:50 a.m. Intention-Based Diagnosis of Programming Errors
W. Lewis Johnson and Elliot Soloway, Yale
University
11:50 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. A Forward Inference Engine to Aid in Understanding
Specifications
Donald Cohen, USC/Information Sciences Institute

-18-

TUESDAY AFTERNOON
--------------------------------------------------------------------

12:15 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Lunch (for Technical Sessions)

1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Lunch (for Tutorials)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. TUTORIAL NO. 5: BUILDING EXPERT SYSTEMS: PART 2-
LBJ Auditorium PRAGMATICS

Speakers: Dr. John McDermott, Carnegie-Mellon
University and Dr. Michael R. Genesereth,
Stanford University

2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. TUTORIAL NO. 7: ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE
Room 1.110 in PROGRAMMING TECHNIQUES
Thompson Conference
Center Speaker: Dr. Eugene Charniak, Brown University


-19-

TUESDAY AFTERNOON
----------------------------------------------------------------------
2:00 p.m. to 4:50 p.m.TECHNICAL PAPER SESSION:
Opera Lab Theatre SPEECH RECOGNITION AND NATURAL LANGUAGE
in the Performing UNSERSTANDING
Arts Center

2:00 p.m. to 2:25 p.m. A System of Plans for Connected Speech Recognition
Renato DeMori and Yu F. Mong, Concordia
University

2:25 p.m. to 2:50 p.m A Production Rule System for Message Summarization
Elaine Marsh and Henry Hamburger, Naval
Research Laboratory;
Ralph Grishman, New York University
2:50 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Frame Selection in Parsing
Steven L. Lytinen, Yale University
3:15 p.m. to 3:35 p.m. Break (go to the Opera Lab Theatre's Lobby)


Opera Lab Theatre
in the Performing
Arts Center
3:35 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Referential Determinism and Computational Efficiency:
Posting Constraints From Deep Structure
Gavan Duffy and John C. Mallery, Massachusetts
Institute of Technology
4:00 p.m. to 4:25 p.m. A Semantic Process for Syntactic Disambiguation
Graeme Hirst, University of Toronto
4:25 p.m. to 4:50 p.m. Phenomenologically Plausible Parsing
David L. Waltz and Jordan B. Pollack, University
of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

-20-

TUESDAY AFTERNOON
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

2:00 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. TECHNICAL PAPER SESSION:
Bates Recital Hall LEARNING
in the Music Building

2:00 p.m. to 2:25 p.m. Towards Chunking as a General Learning Mechanism
John E. Laird, Paul S. Rosenbloom, and Allen
Newell, Carnegie-Mellon University
2:25 p.m. to 2:50 p.m. Learning Operator Transformations
Bruce Porter and Dennis Kibler,
University of California at Irvine
2:50 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Learning About Systems That Contain State
Variables
Thomas G. Dietterich, Stanford University
3:15 p.m. to 3:35 p.m. Break (go to the Opera Lab Theatre's Lobby)
3:35 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Learning Problem Classes by Means of
Experimentation and Generalization
Agustin A. Araya, P. Universidad Catolica
de Chile
4:00 p.m. to 4:25 p.m. Generalization for Explanation-Based Schema
Acquisition
Paul O'Rorke, University of Illinois at Urbana-
Champaign
4:25 p.m. to 4:50 p.m. Constraint-Based Generalization: Learning
Game-Playing Plans from Single Examples
Steven Minton, Carnegie-Mellon University
4:50 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. Constraint Limited Generalization: Acquiring
Procedures From Examples
Peter Andreae, Massachusetts Institute of
Technology
--------------------------------------------------------------------

2:00 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. TECHNICAL PAPER SESSION:
Concert Hall in the QUALITATIVE REASONING
Performing Arts
Center

2:00 p.m. to 2:25 p.m. Qualitative Modeling in the Turbojet Engine Domain
Raman Rajagopalan, University of Illinois at
Urbana-Champaign
2:25 p.m. to 2:50 p.m. Qualitative Reasoning With Higher-Order Derivatives
Johan de Kleer and Daniel G. Bobrow, Xerox
Palo Alto Research Center
2:50 p.m.to 3:15 p.m. The Use of Continuity in a Qualitative Physics
Brian C. Williams, Massachusetts Institute of
Technology
3:15 p.m. to 3:35 p.m. Break (go to the mezzanine level of the Concert Hall)

-21-

TUESDAY AFTERNOON
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

3:35 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. TECHNICAL PAPER SESSION:
Concert Hall in AUTOMATED REASONING AND KNOWLEDGE REPRESENTATION
the Performing
Arts Center


3:35 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Meta-Level Control Through Fault Detection
and Diagnosis
Eva Hudlicka and Victor R. Lesser, University
of Massachusetts
4:00 p.m. to 4:25 p.m. Diagnosing Circuits With State: An Inherently
Underconstrained Problem
Walter Hamscher and Randall Davis, Massachusetts
of Technology
4:25 p.m. to 4:50 p.m. Implicit Ordering of Defaults in Inheritance
Systems
David S. Touretzky, Carnegie-Mellon University
4:50 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. Knowledge Inversion
Yoav Shoham and Drew V. McDermott, Yale
University

TUESDAY EVENING
--------------------------------------------------------------------

6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Informal Reception
Concert Hall's
Mezzanine and
3rd Floor


-22-


WEDNESDAY MORNING
-------------------------------------------------------------------
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONFERENCE REGISTRATION AND CONFERENCE
Childress Room in the PROCEEDINGS PICK-UP
Villa Capri Motel
-------------------------------------------------------------------

9:00 a.m. to 10:40 a.m. TECHNICAL PAPER SESSION:
Concert Hall in the INEXACT REASONING
Performing Arts
Center

9:00 a.m. to 9:25 a.m. Non-monotonic Reasoning using Dempster's rule
M. L. Ginsberg, Stanford University
9:25 a.m. to 9:50 a.m. A Set-Theoretic Framework for the Processing
of Uncertain Knowledge
S. Y. Lu and H. E. Stephanou, Exxon
Production Center Co.
9:50 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. Continuing Belief Functions for Evidential
Reasoning
Thomas M. Strat, SRI International
10:15 a.m. to 10:40 a.m. Likelihood, Probability, and Knowledge
Joseph Y. Halpern, IBM Research Laboratory;
David A. McAllester, Massachusetts Institute of
Technology
10:40 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. Break (go to the mezzanine level of the Concert Hall)
11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. PANEL: THE MANAGEMENT OF UNCERTAINTY IN
Concert Hall in the INTELLIGENT SYSTEMS
Performing Arts
Center
Chair: Ronald R. Yager, National Science
Foundation
Panelists: Paul Cohen, University of
Massachusetts;
John Lowrance, SRI International
Judea Pearl, University of California at
Los Angeles
Glen Shafer, University of Kansas
Lotfi Zadeh, University of California at
Berkeley
Jon Doyle, Carnegie-Mellon University

The emergence of knowledge engineering as one of the most important
areas of activity within AI has focused the attention of researchers on
issues relating to the management of uncertainty in expert and other
intelligent systems. A number of different approaches have been
suggested for representing and manipulating uncertainty. This panel
brings together a number of leading proponents of these different
approaches, attempting to expose important techniques and methodologies,
and clarify the differences between them.

-23-
WEDNESDAY MORNING
-----------------------------------------------------------------
9:25 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. TECHNICAL PAPER SESSION:
Opera Lab Theatre VISION
in the Performing
Arts Center

9:25 a.m. to 9:50 a.m. A Representation for Image Curves
David H. Marimont, Stanford University
9:50 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. The Shape of Subjective Contours
Jon A. Webb, Carnegie-Mellon University and
Edward Pervin, Perq Systems Corporation
10:15 a.m. to 10:40 a.m.Domain Independent Object Description and
Decomposition
Tod S. Levitt, Advanced Information &
Decision Systems
10:40 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.Break (go to the Opera Lab Theatre's Lobby)

11:00 a.m. to 11:25 a.m.Reconstructing a Visible Surface
A. Blake, University of Edinburgh
11:25 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.Efficient Multiresolution Algorithms for Computing
Lightness, Shape-From-Shading, and Optical Flow
Demetri Terzopoulos, Massachusetts Institute
of Technology
11:50 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.Fingerprints Theorems
A.L. Yuille and T. Poggio, Massachusetts Institute
of Technology

9:00 a.m. to 10:40 a.m. TECHNICAL PAPER SESSION:
Bates Recital Hall EXPLANATION & NATURAL LANGUAGE GENERATION
in the Music
Building

9:00 a.m. to 9:25 a.m. Context-Dependent Transitions in Tutoring
Discourse
Beverly Woolf and David D. McDonald,
University of Massachusetts
9:25 a.m. to 9:50 a.m. Living Up to Expectations: Computing Expert
Responses
Aravind Joshi and Bonnie Webber, University
of Pennsylvania; Ralph Weischedel,
University of Delaware
9:50 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. Selective Abstraction of AI System Activity
Jasmina Pavlin and Daniel D. Corkill,
University of Massachusetts
10:15 a.m. to 10:40 a.m.Self-Explanatory Financial Planning Models
Donald W. Kosy and Ben P. Wise, Carnegie-Mellon
University
10:40 a.m. to 11:00 a.m.Break (go to the Opera Lab Theatre's Lobby)

-24-


WEDNESDAY MORNING
------------------------------------------------------------------

11:00 a.m. to 11:25 a.m. TECHNICAL PAPER SESSION:
Bates Recital Hall COGNITIVE MODELING
in the Performing
Arts Center

11:00 a.m. to 11:25 a.m.Explaining and Arguing With Examples
Edwina L. Rissland, Eduardo M. Valcarce, and
Kevin D. Ashley, University of Massachusetts
11:25 a.m. to 11:50 a.m. Automated Cognitive Modeling
Pat Langley and Stellan Ohlsson, Carnegie-Mellon
University
11:50 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. A Model of Lexical Access of Ambiguous Words
Garrison W. Cottrell, University of Rochester


-25-

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON
----------------------------------------------------------------------
12:30 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Lunch

12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. SIGART Annual Business Meeting
Recital Studio in
the Music Building
------------------------------------------------------------------------
2:00 p.m. to 3:35 p.m. TECHNICAL PAPER SESSION:
Bates Recital Hall AUTOMATIC THEOREM-PROVING
in the Music Building

2:00 p.m. to 2:25 p.m.Generalization Heuristics for Theorems Related
to Recursively Defined Functions
S. Kamal Abdali, Computer Research Lab;
Jan Vytopil, BSO-AT
2:25 p.m. to 2:50 p.m. A Mechanical Solution of Schubert's Steamroller
by Many-Sorted Resolution
Christoph Walther, Universitat Karlsruhe
2:50 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. A Self-Modifying Theorem Prover
Cynthia A. Brown, GTE Laboratories Incorporated
3:15 p.m. to 3:35 p.m. Break (go to the Opera Lab Theatre's Lobby)

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

2:00 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. TECHNICAL PAPER SESSION:
Opera Lab Theatre ROBOTICS
in the Performing
Arts Center

2:00 p.m. to 2:25 p.m. Three Findpath Problems
Richard S. Wallace, Carnegie-Mellon University
2:25 p.m. to 2:50 p.m. Path Relaxation: Path Planning for a Mobile
Robot
Charles E. Thorpe, Carnegie-Mellon University
2:50 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Task Frames in Robot Manipulation
Dana H. Ballard, University of Rochester
3:15 p.m. to 3:35 p.m. Break (go to the Opera Lab Theatre's Lobby)


---------------------------------------------------------------
2:00 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. TECHNICAL PAPER SESSION:
Concert Hall in the EXPERT SYSTEMS
Performing Arts
Center

2:00 p.m. to 2:25 p.m. Personal Construct Theory and the Transfer of Human
Expertise
John H. Boose, Boeing Computer Services
2:25 p.m. to 2:50 p.m. Classification Problem Solving
William J. Clancey, Stanford University
2:50 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. YES/MVS: A Continuous Real Time Expert System
J.H. Griesmer, S.J. Hong,M. Karnaugh, J.K. Kastner,
M.I. Schor, R.L. Ennis, D.A. Klein, K.R.Milliken, and
H.M. VanWoerkom, IBM T.J. Watson Research Center
3:15 p.m. to 3:35 p.m. Break (go to the mezzanine level of the Concert Hall)

-26-
WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON
------------------------------------------------------------------------
3:35 p.m. to 5:20 p.m. THE 1984 PUBLISHER'S PRIZE PAPERS
Concert Hall in the ( donated by MIT Press)
Performing Arts
Center

3:35 p.m. to 3:40 p.m. PRESENTATION OF THE 1984 PUBLISHER'S PRIZE AWARDS
by John McCarthy, AAAI's President

PRESENTATION OF THE PUBLISHER'S PRIZE PAPERS

3:40 p.m. to 4:05 p.m. Choices Without Backtracking
Johan de Kleer, Xerox Palo Alto Research Center
4:05 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. A Logic of Implicit and Explicit Belief
Hector J. Levesque, Fairchild Laboratory for
Artificial Intelligence Research
4:30 p.m. to 4:55 p.m. Shading into Texture
Alex P. Pentland, SRI International
4:55 p.m. to 5:20 p.m. The Tractability of Subsumption in Frame-Based
Description Languages
Ronald J. Brachman and Hector J. Levesque,
Fairchild Laboratory for Artificial Intelligence
Research**

WEDNESDAY EVENING
------------------------------------------------------------------------
6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Main Conference Reception
Concert Hall's Mezzanineand 3rd Level

7:00 p.m. AAAI Executive Council Meeting

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

7:00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PANEL: RESULTS OF THE STANFORD LISP TIMING AND
Opera Lab Theatre EVALUATION PROJECT
in the Performing
Arts Center Chair:
Richard P. Gabriel, Stanford University

Panelists:
Daniel Weinreb, Symbolics, Inc.
Jon L. White, Xerox Palo Alto Research Center
Richard J. Fateman, Univ. of California at Berkeley
Martin L. Griss, Hewlett-Packard
Bob Kessler, University of Utah

The results of the Stanford Lisp Performance Evaluation Project will be
presented. In addition to a description of the benchmark suite used by
the project, timings for the following implementations will be given:
DEC-10 MacLisp, DEC-2060 InterLisp, VAX Common Lisp, Vax Franz Lisp, Vax
PSL, MC68000 PSL, MC68000 Franz, Symbolics 3600, Dorado, Dolphin,
Dandelion, Cray PSL, and S-1 Lisp.

A panel of implementors will be on hand to answer questions regarding the
performance of their implementations.

-27-

THURSDAY MORNING
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CONFERENCE REGISTRATION AND CONFERENCE
Childress Room in the PROCEEDINGS PICK-UP
Villa Capri Motel
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. PANEL: INFORMATION PROCESSORS AS ORGANIZATIONS
Concert Hall in the
Performing Arts
Center
Chair: Randall Davis, Massachusetts Institute of
Technology

Panelists:
Scott E. Fahlman, Carnegie-Mellon University
Michael Genesereth, Stanford University
Victor Lesser, University of Massachusetts
Thomas Malone, Massachusetts Institute of Technology


The chairman will lay out a set of provocative and/or controversial
issues, and each panelist will respond to these issues. There will
be a short time for audience reactions at the end of the discussion.

The issues include

1. Why should AI people worry about cooperative problem solving?

a. When is cooperative problem-solving better than simply distributed
computation? [i.e., when should the mechanism of cooperation itself be the
object of problem solving rather than using fairly simple predetermined
methods for distributing pieces of computation?]

b. Which of the following two approaches to parallelism is
more promising: (i) lots of dumb processors with simple coordination
methods or (ii) fewer, more intelligent processors, with more complex
coordination methods? [or rather, when is each method appropriate?]

2. Is there anything useful for AI to learn from studying how groups of
people, including large organizations, solve problems?

(The panelists bring to the discussion their experience in these areas:
Davis - Contract Nets and other distributed problem-solving work;
Fahlman - Recent work on Boltzman machines, large networks of "dumb
processors";
Genesereth - Intelligent Agents Project and recent theorems about when it
is desirable for agents to lie to each other;
Lesser - Hearsay and recent work on distributed problem-solving testbed;
Malone - Enterprise system and recent theorems about tradeoffs between
different generic organizational structures.)

-28-

THURSDAY MORNING
----------------------------------------------------------------

10:30 a.m. to 10:50 a.m. Break (coffee will be provided on the mezzanine
level of the Concert Hall)

10:50 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. WELCOME TO AAAI-84 CONFERENCE ATTENDEES by
Concert Hall in the Dr. Gerhard Fonken, Vice President of
Performing Arts Academic Affairs and Research
Center The University of Texas at Austin

11:00 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. AAAI PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS
Concert Hall in the John McCarthy, Stanford University
Performing Arts "What is Common Sense?"
Center

-29-

THURSDAY AFTERNOON
----------------------------------------------------------------------

12:15 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Lunch

12:15 p.m. to 1:15 p.m. AAAI Annual Business Meeting
Concert Hall in the
Performing Arts
Center
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. INVITED LECTURE: A PERSPECTIVE ON PLANNING
Concert Hall in the
Performing Arts Speaker: Stan Rosenschein, SRI International
Center

For over a decade and a half AI planning has been concerned with how
machines might be made to act rationally by first reasoning about the
effects of their potential actions and then performing only those
actions which are believed to lead to desired outcomes. Although this
idea is intuitively appealing, the road to artificial rationality has
been strewn with obstacles. To a large extent, the practical
difficulties in building such systems have been a major stimulus for
fundamental work in a wide variety of AI topics: temporal reasoning,
belief modeling, deduction, non-monotonic reasoning, modeling multiple
agents, and more. This talk will attempt to put planning work in
perspective and to identify promising directions for future research

3:00 p.m. to 3:20 p.m. Break ( on the mezzanine level of the Concert Hall)

--------------------------------------------------------------------------

3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. PANEL: AI IN THE MARKETPLACE: ISSUES IN TRANSFER
Concert Hall in the OF AI TECHNOLOGY TO PRODUCTS
Performing Arts
Center
Chair: Tom Kehler, IntelliCorp

Panelists:
John Seely Brown, Xerox Palo Alto Research Center
David Caine, Electric Power Research Institute
Peter Hart, Syntelligence Inc.
Fred Luconi, Applied Expert Systems
Dennis O'Connor, Digital Equipment Corp.
Howard Shrobe, Symbolics, Inc.
Harry Tennant, Texas Instruments

A common question asked by many managers, scientists and engineers is:
where has AI technology led to a product in common use? Retrospective
views of technology transfer have credited AI technology with everything
from timesharing to spread sheet programs. Now that there is strong
commercial interest in directing the technology to products, how do we
deal with the difficult issues of technology transfer such as: scale-up,
product reliability, system integration, cost/performance, and training?
The panelists will attempt to address these issues from their
perspectives as participants in the process of technology transfer.

-30-


THURSDAY EVENING
--------------------------------------------------------------

6:15 p.m. Shuttle Buses will begin to load
at 21 St. and Speedway from
the Performing Arts Center site for the Fiesta
Reception. From the
Villa Capri Motel, you can pick up the
shuttle at 24th Street and Red River St.

6:25 p.m. Shuttle Buses from the Villa Capri will
pick up attendees at the Sheraton-Crest Inn and
Hyatt (6:30).

6:30 p.m. Shuttle Buses from the PAC will pick up
attendees at Jester Center.

7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Fiesta Reception
Fiesta Gardens,
Austin

-31-


FRIDAY MORNING

--------------------------------------------------------------------

9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. TUTORIAL AND PANEL: PARADIGMS FOR MACHINE LEARNING
Concert Hall in the
Performing Arts The session will be divided into two parts:
Center
Part 1. Tutorial.
A single presentation defining and outlining each
major approach
to Machine Learning, and contrasting them
with each other on the
basis of objectives, techniques,
limitations, and applications.

The role of the tutorial is to:
- Introduce each paradigm and the contrastive
dimensions listed above.
- Present some meaningful comparative analysis.
- Raise potentially controversial issues
to be addressed in the ensuing panel discussion.

Tutorial presenter: Jaime Carbonell

Part 2. Panel discussion.

Each Machine Learning paradigm will be
represented by a panelist advocating that
particular approach. The panelists are active
researchers with considerable experience in ML
in general and their approach in particular.

Discussion Leader: Patrick Winston

Panelists:
Tom Mitchell, Rutgers University
(Analytical Generalization)
Ryzsard Michalski, University of Illinois
(Empirical Induction)
John Holland (Genetic Algorithms)
Doug Lenat, Stanford University (Discovery Systems)
Jaime Carbonell, Carnegie-Mellon University
(Learning by Analogy)

The panel discussion will center on addressing specific issues raised in
the preceding tutorial (the panelists will be informed ahead of time of
these issues). We are explicitly disallowing prepared statements by the
panel -- we hope to have a real discussion focused around a few burning
issues.


-32-


FRIDAY MORNING
------------------------------------------------------------------------

(Continuation of Paradigms for Machine Learning)


Some topics for discussion include:

- What long term contribution to the science will your approach make,
and how does it integrate into other AI problems or areas?
- Identify one or more intriguing thesis topics in your approach.
- What is the major limitation suffered by other approachs that your
paradigm strives to overcome, if any?

10:30 a.m. to 10:50 a.m. Break (on the mezzanine level in the Concert Hall)
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

10:50 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. PANEL: DARPA'S STRATEGIC COMPUTING PROJECT:
Concert Hall Challenges and Changes for AI

Moderator: Mark Stefik, Xerox Palo Alto
Research Center

Participants (all from DARPA):
Lynn Conway
Steve Squires
Paul Losleben
Clinton Kelley

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency has started a major
ten-year project for developing "machine intelligence technology" in the
US. The plan proposes activities in the academic, industrial, and
military sectors. It has been launched with a $300 million budget for
the first three years.

The DARPA plan sets ten year objectives in technology in
microelectronics, computer science, and artificial intelligence. Ten
years of sustained funding can profoundly influence the directions of
research, the sizes of scientific and technical communities, and the
structures of institutions. This session includes a presentation of the
goals and status of the Strategic Computing project, followed by a panel
of representatives from DARPA. Questions from the audience will be
solicited.

Part 1. Presentation of DARPA's program in Machine Intelligence
Technologies

- Program Overview, Lynn Conway
- Computer Architecture, Steve Squires
- Infrastructure, Paul Losleben
- Example Application, Clinton Kelley

-33-


FRIDAY MORNING
---------------------------------------------------------------------

(Continuation of DARPA's Stragetic Computing Project: Challenges and
Changes for AI)

Part 2. Panel Discussion

This part will be divided between some previously collected questions
and ones from the audience. Possible questions include

- The overall plan schedules the creation of new kinds of
computers, new kinds of computer language, new kinds of devices, new
tools for knowledge representation, and new sophisticated and complex
applications. Is the plan wildly overambitious?

- Is the military slant to strategic computing compatible with the
university framework? Just what kind of research is SC funding at the
universities? What percentages of research will go on at the
universities and industrial and military sites?

- Looking at the formation of the new AI companies, the siphoning of
talent to the new AI companies, and the dwindling number of active
researchers, Marvin Minsky has characterized AI as in a "state of
chaos". Is there enough talent in AI and CS in the country to do this
project? Will the project put further strain on the universities?

- Comparison to the Japanese 5th generation project.


-34-

FRIDAY AFTERNOON
-------------------------------------------------------------------
12:30 p.m. to 1:45 p.m. Lunch
--------------------------------------------------------------------

1:45 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. INVITED LECTURE: ANN OVERVIEW OF NATURAL LANGUAGE
Concert Hall in the GENERATION
Performing Arts
Center Speaker: Bonnie Lynn Webber, University of
Pennsylvania

Current work in Natural Language generation encompasses research in four
major areas: (1) identifying what needs to be communicated (e.g., that a
decision needs to be justified and that particular reasoning will be
used in its support); (2) identifying how the material should be
organized into a text (e.g., using point by point contrast of this
conclusion vs. an alternative one); (3) identifying what information
needs to be made explicit (e.g., taking advantage of what can be
conveyed by implicature or what is already evident to the listener,
choosing what properties to make explicit in order to get the listener
to identify an intended referent); and (4) identifying how things should
be said (i.e., identifying the words and syntactic structures that will
enable easy comprehension and providing grammars and lexicons that will
permit appropriate choices). This talk will provide an overview on this
research.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
2:00 p.m. R & D EXHIBIT PROGRAM CLOSES

------------------------------------------------------------------------
2:30p.m. to 4:00 p.m. PANEL: THE 'DARK AGES' OF AI -- CAN WE AVOID THEM
Concert Hall in the OR SURVIVE THEM?
Performing Arts
Center
Chair: Drew McDermott, Yale University

Panelists:
B. Chandrasekaran, Ohio State University
John McDermott, Carnegie-Mellon University
Ron Ohlander, DARPA
Roger Schank, Yale University
Mitch Waldrop, Science Magazine
-------
Many people in the field are disturbed by the incredibly high
expectations AI has generated in the public consciousness. These
expectations are partly our fault, partly due to sensationalism by
popular journalists, and partly due to a "will to believe" on the part
of key military and industrial people. Many AI researchers are starting
to talk about a coming "AI winter," after these expectations fail to be
satisfied, where, as a consequence, money for both basic and applied
research would dry up.

The panel will discuss, among other things,

- Are expectations really too high?
- How can we get the real story out?
- How can we convince the world that a lot more basic
research needs to be done, in addition to applying
the (small amount) that is already known?
- Are we headed for disaster?

-35-


4:00 pm - 6:00 pm Hail and Farewell
Concert Hall's
Mezzanine and 3rd
Floor in the
Performing Arts Center


-------
* If you are to speak in the Opera Lab Theatre, enter the stage
from the house left side, exit the doors in the corridor,
climb three steps, and then turn right onto the stage.


** The authors of this paper have declined to accept this cash award,
and have instead asked the Program Commitee to award it to the
best paper by a student or recent student. The winner of this
award will be announced on Wednesday afternoon at the Publisher's
Prize session.


-36-

-------

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