Coke, classic coke and new coke

33 views
Skip to first unread message

Steve Corbin

unread,
Aug 15, 1986, 5:24:36 PM8/15/86
to

Well, not to start up a big heated discussion or anything, but I have
bad news for those of you in netland who think that Coca-cola is still
producing coke. There not. They make classic and new coke. Not coke.

I think that everyone agrees (except the Pepsi drinkers) that new coke is
terrible so I won't talk about new coke any more.
However, there is a clear difference in taste between coke and classic coke.
When Coca-cola announced they were changing the formula, I stocked up on
cases of the real stuff. I still had coke for a couple of months after
classic came out. When my supply of coke was running out, I bought some
classic. When I popped the top off the classic coke I immediately noticed
a citrus scent - a scent that coke never had.
After I poured the classic into a glass, the head died quickly. Not like
coke where the head fizzled down slowly. Coke seemed to have a thicker
and denser colored foam when poured.
The taste test is what brought the disappointment. The 'bite' that coke
has(had) was readily missing in the classic. Classic was also a little
sweeter and citrusy (sp?). I found the carbonation to be roughly the same
though coke had a slight more than classic.
Checking the ingredients for classic coke showed one difference from coke:
"high fructose corn syrup and/or sucrose" was substituted for sugar.
It may well be that the classic 'formula' is the same as coke but the
ingredients are clearly different and result in a different taste.

A friend of mine has an interesting theory why Coca-cola changed the formula.
We all know that cocaine was used in the original formula and was taken out
around the turn of the century (I don't know the accurate date). Coca-cola
may have added some other ingredient to retain the 'bite', flavor or
pick-me-up qualities that the cocaine provided. Since Coca-cola will not
reveal their 'secret' recipe it is hard to tell. But what if this were so
and Coca-cola recently discovered some negative, bad or harmful aspects of
this ingredient and was forced or compelled to change the formula. The best
way to do this would be come up with a horrible formula and stop producing
the good stuff. Then wait long enough so that the real coke is off all
the supermarket shelves and the reserve many people will have built up is
depleted. Then back down under public pressure and come out with classic.
This way most people will not notice the difference from coke and classic
since the comparison will be from new coke (most recent drinking experiences)
and classic.

I had a few people (my mother, my wife and a friend) also taste real coke
and classic coke and all said the same thing - the 'bite' was gone and
classic was sweeter and citrusier (sp?).

These are my opinions of course (and my friends) and I am truly disappointed
that I can no longer but the best soda (soft drink, tonic) that ever was.


Sincerely,
Stephen Serrenho Corbin
Usenet {ihnp4, allegra, linus} ! encore ! corbin

Don Licsak

unread,
Aug 16, 1986, 10:46:36 AM8/16/86
to

Steve Corben says -

> I had a few people (my mother, my wife and a friend) also taste real coke
> and classic coke and all said the same thing - the 'bite' was gone and
> classic was sweeter and citrusier (sp?).
>

I'm glad I'm not the only who thinks Classic Coke isn't the same as the
original formula. It tastes slightly sweeter to me, also. I can't detect
a citrus taste, but everyone's taste isn't the same.

I just wish they had left well enough alone. What's that saying about if
it isn't broken, don't try and fix it? I'm still a Coke drinker, but I've
begun to acquire a taste for RC Cola. Very similiar to original Coke.


--

Don Licsak ihnp4!hsi!licsak
Health Systems International
New Haven, CT 06511


"For Peace Of Mind, Resign As General Manager Of The Universe"

Chris Andersen

unread,
Aug 16, 1986, 7:13:50 PM8/16/86
to
*sigh* don't you just love people who like to find a conspiracy in everything?

When it comes to deciding between a big complex conspiracy and just a bunch
of business execs making a bonehead decisions, I'll go with the later theory.
It's much simpler and makes a lot more sense.
--
My mailbox is always willing to accept letters.

Yours in better understanding,
Chris Andersen (chrisa@tekig5)

P.S. August 26 is my last day on the net. If you want to keep in contact,
then reach me before that date.

Jerry Natowitz

unread,
Aug 17, 1986, 6:01:17 PM8/17/86
to
> A friend of mine has an interesting theory why Coca-cola changed the formula.
> We all know that cocaine was used in the original formula and was taken out
> around the turn of the century (I don't know the accurate date). Coca-cola
> may have added some other ingredient to retain the 'bite', flavor or
> pick-me-up qualities that the cocaine provided. Since Coca-cola will not
> reveal their 'secret' recipe it is hard to tell. But what if this were so
> and Coca-cola recently discovered some negative, bad or harmful aspects of
> this ingredient and was forced or compelled to change the formula. The best
> way to do this would be come up with a horrible formula and stop producing
> the good stuff. Then wait long enough so that the real coke is off all
> the supermarket shelves and the reserve many people will have built up is
> depleted. Then back down under public pressure and come out with classic.
> This way most people will not notice the difference from coke and classic
> since the comparison will be from new coke (most recent drinking experiences)
> and classic.

One of the flavor ingediants in coke is decocainized coca leaf
extract. I have no idea what it tastes like but with the very limited
medical uses of cocaine I suppose that Coca-Cola's demand for coca leaves
was greater than the pharaceutical demand, hence extra cocaine base.
Perhaps a request from the powers that be persuaded Coca-Cola to change
their formula.

Me, I prefer seltzer.
--
Jerry Natowitz
Bell Labs HR 2A-214
201-615-5178 (no CORNET)
ihnp4!houxm!hropus!jin
or ihnp4!opus!jin

dur...@uiucuxc.cso.uiuc.edu

unread,
Aug 17, 1986, 7:19:00 PM8/17/86
to

I just discovered, after reading your article, that the coke machine
here is really just that...a COKE machine. It is a new machine, and right
on it is a picture of COKE CLASSIC and COKE side by side, and one of the
choices on the "buttons" is COKE, and though I haven't seen it advertised
as making a comeback or tried it yet, it looks as though the real thing has
returned in true form. I probably won't try it, since I am a Mountain Dew
drinker, but I just might so's I can tell you what it's like, and make a
comparison to CLASSIC.

Until the next taste test.....

--_-stauffer

BLEAH!

Barry Margolin

unread,
Aug 18, 1986, 3:17:27 AM8/18/86
to
In article <3...@encore.UUCP> cor...@encore.UUCP (Steve Corbin) writes:
>Checking the ingredients for classic coke showed one difference from coke:
>"high fructose corn syrup and/or sucrose" was substituted for sugar.
>It may well be that the classic 'formula' is the same as coke but the
>ingredients are clearly different and result in a different taste.

Sorry, but this change occurred before New Coke was introduced. First
of all, sucrose == sugar, so the ingrdient above allows for old and
classic coke to be the same. However, the point of this posting is to
point out that they were using corn syrup before they created New Coke.
Most of my friends believe this was merely because sugar is more
expensive than corn syrup.

The original poster also made some points about taste and foam
differences. Since I am not a cola drinker, I won't comment on those
points. I certainly believe that they are possible.
--
Barry Margolin
ARPA: barmar@MIT-Multics
UUCP: ..!genrad!mit-eddie!barmar

Dave Katz

unread,
Aug 19, 1986, 2:04:37 PM8/19/86
to
An alternate theory which I heard for why the new Coke / Coke Classic
situation occurred is as follows:

1. Coca-Cola was locked into several old contracts to provide the syrup
for their soft drink (for lack of a contract to read from, call it
"Coke").

The contracts had two important features:

i. The syrup was to be provided to the bottlers AT A FIXED PRICE
(possibly applies to only some contracts with bottlers but not
all)

ii. Coca-Cola reserved the right to change the formula for the syrup
at any time.

2. Coca-Cola was losing money (profits) honoring these contracts
because of increased materials costs for producing the syrup.

3. Coca-Cola changed the formula for Coke within their rights according
the contract. This formula MAY have been chosen to be less than
acceptable to the public.

4. Coca-Cola releases a formula for a "new" soft drink to be known by
the trade name "Coke Classic" (or some variation). The formula is
altered from the original Coke to avoid legal problems but is LIKELY
more acceptable to the public

5. Coca-Cola now negotiates new variable-price contracts with the
bottlers who are anxious to have the product because the level of
customer disatisfaction with the new Coke formula is threatening
their profits.

NOTE: the above is merely speculation on the events which MAY have
occurred and does not represent any specific knowledge of the
events or intentions of any of the involved parties. Any
resemblance to persons, places or companies that may in fact
exist is purely coincidental!!!


But would you want your sister to drink one?
D. Katz

Victor Balaban

unread,
Aug 20, 1986, 10:45:22 PM8/20/86
to
>I believe that we will see the rise of a new class of hackers in the next
>four or five years; hackers who don't know the feeling of staying up for
>60 hours at a time propped up by six or eight liters of The Real Thing,
>who know nothing about how it burned _just so_ going down your throat,
>who will wonder why you maintain that hoarde of cans in your closet
>that looks not so different from the stuff they drink everyday.
>Because they won't remember. I think this must be part of some
>conspiracy; did IBM secretly buy Coke Inc behind our backs?
>

There is hope in sight. There is a company in Rochester that makes Jolt
Cola. It's motto is "all the sugar and twice the caffeine!". I've tried
it, and in addition to getting you pretty wired it tastes great! Sort of
like the Haagen Dasz of sodas. I think it will be marketed nationally
pretty soon.
--


Victor Balaban

Beer. It's not just for breakfast anymore

goo...@uicsl.uucp

unread,
Aug 21, 1986, 9:16:00 PM8/21/86
to

Has anybody noticed the change in diet Coke? (I'm a diabetic, so I can't
have regular soft drinks.) When diet Coke first came out, it was
absolutely the best diet cola -- positively addictive, and worlds above
the competition. Not too sweet, not too cloying. If I remember
correctly, when they switched to NutraSweet the taste changed marginally
for the better.

Then New Coke came along...and diet Coke changed as well. It acquired
rather a sour, unpleasant taste...and *nobody* *said* *a* *word* *about*
*it*. I'm not imagining things...

Daniel P Faigin

unread,
Aug 22, 1986, 11:20:12 AM8/22/86
to
In article <4...@hsi.UUCP> lic...@hsi.UUCP (Don Licsak) writes:
>
>I'm still a Coke drinker, but I've
>begun to acquire a taste for RC Cola. Very similiar to original Coke.

I happen to be allergic to corn. I used to drink a lot of (old)
Coke, no problems. However, I have trouble with Coke Classic (the
2 l bottle used HFCS 98% of the time, the cans, 50%). RC Cola, on
the other hand, does not used HFCS, rather, if you read the
ingredients, it uses sugar. Maybe this is why it tastes closer to
(old) Coke.

Daniel
--
UUCP: {akgua allegra ihnp4 hplabs sdcsvax trwrb cbosgd}!sdcrdcf!faigin
ARPA: sdcrdcf!fai...@UCLA-LOCUS.ARPA --or-- sdcrdcf!fai...@LOCUS.UCLA.EDU

W: System Development Corporation (-: A Sparroughs Company :-)
2525 Colorado MD 91-01; Santa Monica CA 90406; (213) 820-4111 x6393
H: 8333 Columbus Avenue #17; Sepulveda CA 91343; (818) 892-8555

Tom Gross

unread,
Aug 25, 1986, 10:11:59 AM8/25/86
to


One of the apparent differences in "new coke" was that they
stopped using real vanilla beans. The Wall Street Journal
had an article about this when new coke was introduced. Evidently
the world price for vanilla beans dropped dramatically, presumably
coca-cola stopped buying them. the economy of Madagascar was
severely affected. I haven't been following all the new coke
discussions here lately but it may be that coca-cola has stopped
using real vanilla in "classic" coke. somebody could check the
price of vanilla beans over the past year. if they haven't recovered
then probably coca-cola doesn't buy them anymore.

for the record, I drink diet coke.

/tom

Tainter

unread,
Aug 25, 1986, 12:30:16 PM8/25/86
to
> I think this must be part of some
> conspiracy; did IBM secretly buy Coke Inc behind our backs?
> -dave
International Coke and Business Machines?
Little ICBMs all over the place?
--j.a.tainter

Dave Kirby

unread,
Aug 25, 1986, 1:14:51 PM8/25/86
to

In article <10...@tekig5.UUCP> chr...@tekig5.UUCP (Chris Andersen) writes:

>When it comes to deciding between a big complex conspiracy and just a bunch
>of business execs making a bonehead decisions, I'll go with the later theory.


As one sage has aptly said:
"Never attribute to malice what can better be explained by stupidity."

Josh Rosen

unread,
Aug 26, 1986, 6:38:03 PM8/26/86
to
In article <3...@encore.UUCP> cor...@encore.UUCP (Steve Corbin) writes:
>
>
>Well, not to start up a big heated discussion or anything, but I have
>bad news for those of you in netland who think that Coca-cola is still
>producing coke. There not. They make classic and new coke. Not coke.
>
>I think that everyone agrees (except the Pepsi drinkers) that new coke is
>terrible so I won't talk about new coke any more.
>However, there is a clear difference in taste between coke and classic coke.
>When Coca-cola announced they were changing the formula, I stocked up on
>
>These are my opinions of course (and my friends) and I am truly disappointed
>that I can no longer but the best soda (soft drink, tonic) that ever was.
>
>
>Sincerely,
>Stephen Serrenho Corbin
>Usenet {ihnp4, allegra, linus} ! encore ! corbin


It is not possible to draw a conclusion about the formula of classic coke
based on a taste test with year old real coke. There are two reasons for
this, first the taste of coke changes with time and secondly the coca-cola
bottlers have virtually no quality control. I have found that the taste
of coke is radically different from plant to plant. Before the new coke
fiasco the coke from the Needham, Ma. plant was undrinkable while the coke
from the Northhampton, Ma. plant was fine although not as good as the coke
bottled in Illinois (which comes in glass bottles, something that most
New England bottlers have never heard of). After classic coke came back
I noticed that Needham coke had lost it's polluted taste and now tasted
normal. If nothing else the change over must have given them a chance to
clean their equiptment, something they may never have done before.

l.chesal

unread,
Aug 26, 1986, 9:02:20 PM8/26/86
to

My theory on this whole business is that to streamline manufacturing,
a formula for Coke and Diet Coke was devised that differed only in the
sweetener; i.e. Nutrasweet (TM) vs. sugar and corn syrup. They
probably couldn't use the old formula with the artificial sweetener
for some reason.
BTW ---- Coca-cola has never been as good as when you got it in those
little (6 1/2 oz ?) green glass bottles with cork-lined caps! My mom
was addicted to the stuff.

Vickie Klick

unread,
Aug 27, 1986, 3:53:09 PM8/27/86
to
> In article <9...@batcomputer.TN.CORNELL.EDU> vic...@batcomputer.UUCP (Victor Balaban) writes:
> >There is hope in sight. There is a company in Rochester that makes Jolt
> >Cola. It's motto is "all the sugar and twice the caffeine!". I've tried
> >it, and in addition to getting you pretty wired it tastes great! Sort of
> >like the Haagen Dasz of sodas. I think it will be marketed nationally
> >pretty soon.
> >--
Jolt is being sold in the Chicago area by Jewel Food Stores and Osco Drug Stores
(at least). It's listed on register tapes as "CANF JOLT" (or something similar,
so I assume the Canfield's soda company in Chicago has picked it up. I bought
a six-pack, and my husband, my brother-in-law, and I tried it. We were
disappointed - we expected "all the sugar and twice the caffeine" to have more
of an old-Coke style bite to it. Oh well...

As far as the old Coke<>Coke Classic debate goes, my husband was an old Coke
addict of long standing. He can't stand Coke Classic...
Vickie Klick AT&T Bell Laboratories, Naperville, IL
...ihnp4!ihuxa!klick

Ihor W. Slabicky

unread,
Sep 4, 1986, 12:25:31 PM9/4/86
to
> As far as the old Coke<>Coke Classic debate goes, my husband was an old Coke
> addict of long standing. He can't stand Coke Classic...
> Vickie Klick AT&T Bell Laboratories, Naperville, IL
> ...ihnp4!ihuxa!klick

Hey now, wait a minute! I thought that old Coke = Coke Classic.
Now you are saying that they are NOT THE SAME!?!? WTFIGO?
You mean there was Coke, which was replaced by new Coke, but since
new Coke tasted so bad, Coke Classic was added but Coke Classic is
not the same as the original Coke even though Coca-Cola said it was?!

(by the way - if someone would send me a can of Jolt Cola, I'd appreciate
it - it could even be empty!)

(by the way - does anyone here collect old soda pop bottles?)

... {allegra, gatech, ihnp4, linus, raybed2} !rayssd!rayssdb!iws
Ihor Slabicky MS 171 * Raytheon Company * Submarine Signal Division
P.O. Box 360 * Portsmouth, RI 02871-0360 * (401) 847-8000 ext. 5684
1234567890 !#$%^&*()_-+={[}]~`:;"'|\<,>.?/ 0987654321

hof...@hdsvx1.uucp

unread,
Sep 5, 1986, 9:04:20 AM9/5/86
to
[Net.games.trivia readers may skip to the last paragraph.]

Ihor Slabicky writes:
> Hey now, wait a minute! I thought that old Coke = Coke Classic.
> Now you are saying that they are NOT THE SAME!?!? WTFIGO?

Coke spokespeople stated at the time of the New Coke debacle that the
formula for Coke has changed *hundreds* of times since the "original,"
starting with the omission of cocaine (I understand that they still use
"spent" coca leaves, and that the disposal of the cocaine resulting from
the removal effort poses a considerable problem -- anyone have more info?),
and that there had been several formula changes in the years prior to New
Coke. Other people have pointed out that the taste of Coke varies
considerable from bottler to bottler, as anyone who has ever had Coke in
Europe or Mexico can tell you. New Coke was a formula that was aimed at
capturing a different market. When it failed so spectacularly, they
reverted to another formula that was more similar to "old" Coke, but
probably retained some of the properties of New Coke in terms of being
cheaper to make and not quite so sweet. But who knows? Who cares?
IT'S JUST A SOFT DRINK, RIGHT? I gave up on Coke when they bought Taylor
Wines, announcing their intention to control the entire beverage market.
People with such grand ambitions are not very likely to pay attention to
the integrity of a single product.

On a slightly different subject -- I recently saw one of those old-timey
Coke advertisements that they've been putting on mirrors lately, and on
it was a picture of a demure young Gibson Girl who had just had a dainty
sip of Coke and was sitting there with a spaced out, cocaine rush kind
of look on her face. On the table is a scrap of paper with the words
"Good to the Last Drop." I remember this as the old Maxwell House slogan.
[In _Never_Give_a_Sucker_an_Even_break_, W.C. Fields, falling from an
airplane, wishes for a "Maxwell parachute," because it's good to the last
drop.] Was this ever officially the Coke slogan? When did Maxwell start
using it?
--
Richard Hoffman | "Oh life is a wonderful cycle of song,
Schlumberger Well Services | A medley of extemporanea.
hoffman%hds...@slb-doll.csnet | And Love is a thing that can never go wrong
PO Box 2175, Houston, TX 77252 | ... And I am Marie of Roumania." --D. PARKER

Ihor W. Slabicky

unread,
Sep 5, 1986, 12:24:07 PM9/5/86
to
> Sender: i...@rayssdb.UUCP (Ihor W. Slabicky @ Raytheon Co., Portsmouth RI)

> (by the way - if someone would send me a can of Jolt Cola, I'd appreciate
> it - it could even be empty!)

Forget the Jolt Cola - Star Market in Middletown has it for $1.29/2 liters.
Yes, it is the 'adult cola', and it is distributed by Jolt of Rochester, NY.
Why does Star have it? Because it distributes a lot of products handled by
Jewel, the same ones who introduced Jolt Cola to Chi-town.

da...@sci.uucp

unread,
Sep 8, 1986, 4:48:00 PM9/8/86
to
I've noticed that Classic Coke now uses high fructose corn sweeteners.
As far as i remember, old Coke used sugar. The new old coke seems to
taste more of corn syrup than the old old coke.

There was an article in Science News a month or so ago describing some
rather interesting experiments using high-fructose corn sweeteners. Seems
they were feeding pigs this junk to see how good for pigs it was. They had
to call off the experiment prematurely, as all the test group developed
heart problems. Now, pigs are used in these experiments because a pig's
digestive system is remarkably close to a humans.

Anyway, has any pop manufacturer stopped using high-fructose corn sweeteners
as a result of this experiment?


david rickel
cae780!weitek!sci!daver

Ihor W. Slabicky

unread,
Sep 9, 1986, 12:17:47 PM9/9/86
to
Hello Coca-Cola lovers,

Yes, you are right about the taste of Coke/New Coke/Classic Coke.
Let me paraphrase from a Washington Post article that appeared in
the Hartford Courant of Sept. 7, 1986: "Coke 'The Real Thing'?
Well, Classic Not Quite".

Classic Coke is not neccesarily "the real thing," two Houston
scientists have found. Laboratory analyses showed that Classic
Coke's formula is not always the same as that of "old Coke" tested
by the scientists. The difference is the type of sugar used to
sweeten the beverage. The laboratory analyses, reported in the
British scientific journal Nature, suggest why. Old Coke, tested
in 1983, was 3.3 percent fructose, 2.9 percent glucose, and 4.7
percent sucrose. Classic Coke was 6.3 percent fructose and 4.6
percent glucose, with no sucrose. The scientists called this
"transition Coke." New Coke uses the same two sugars but in
concentrations about 10 percent higher. The Classic Coke appeared
to be a reversion to the two sugar formula of "transition Coke"
which was on the market only a few months, and not a genuine
revival of the earlier three sugar formula. Each kind of sugar,
although sweet, is chemically distinct and has its own flavor
nuances. A spokesman for Coca-Cola said Coke's formula has
changed through the years and that the choice of sugars, once
strictly specified by the company, is now largely left to
local bottlers. The parent company supplies only a syrup
consisting of a "secret formula" mixture of flavoring and
coloring agents. When first sold, the only allowed sweetener
was cane sugar, which is sucrose. In 1940, the company gave
bottlers the option of substituting beet sugar, also sucrose.
In 1980 bottlers were offered a third option. They could omit
some sucrose and substitute with "high fructose corn syrup,"
which is a mixture of fructose and glucose. Finally, in
November 1984, bottlers were allowed to use 100 percent corn
syrup if they wanted.

-well, that's it, folks. Thanks for the mail!

Scott Hazen Mueller

unread,
Sep 9, 1986, 1:23:58 PM9/9/86
to
In article <> hof...@hdsvx1.UUCP writes:
> On the table is a scrap of paper with the words
>"Good to the Last Drop." I remember this as the old Maxwell House slogan.
> Was this ever officially the Coke slogan? When did Maxwell start
>using it?
>--
> Richard Hoffman

This one I know. It was always a Maxwell House slogan. It originated with
Theodore Roosevelt (that's right, the President) way back when. Old TR was
always a colorful sort... Once, when he was out hunting, he and his companions
came across a bear caught in a beartrap. He refused to kill this bear and the
story made the newspapers. Shortly after, a shopkeeper who had a stuffed
bear for sale put the bear in his window with a sign "Teddy's Bear". Instant
hit...
\scott
--
Scott Hazen Mueller lll-crg.arpa!csustan!smdev
City of Turlock work: (209) 668-5590 -or- 5628
901 South Walnut Avenue home: (209) 527-1203
Turlock, CA 95380 <Insert pithy saying here...>

Larry A. Gilmore

unread,
Sep 11, 1986, 10:05:40 AM9/11/86
to

At least in the late 40s, the only use I had ever heard of
"good to the last drop" was indeed the Maxwell House coffee
commercials.

Dave Kirby

unread,
Sep 11, 1986, 5:52:04 PM9/11/86
to
>(by the way - if someone would send me a can of Jolt Cola, I'd appreciate
>it - it could even be empty!)

If it were empty, it wouldn't be a can of Jolt Cola.
(More captious carping from me, your network nitpicker...)


>(by the way - does anyone here collect old soda pop bottles?)

I have a small collection myself, actually. Most of the bottles
were gleaned from beneath my grandparents' house.

Once my parents lived in an old house in Dawson, Georgia; in the
chicken pen (or perhaps they were slave quarters :-) there were some
ancient bottles of Coca-Cola with the ORIGINAL SYRUP still in them!
Alas, they moved away and abandoned the bottles before I could get
home from college and lay my hands on them.

-----------------------------------------------------------------
Dave Kirby ( ...!ihnp4!akgua!cylixd!cylixb!dave)

Marty Smith

unread,
Sep 12, 1986, 11:55:34 AM9/12/86
to
In article <2...@sci.UUCP> da...@sci.UUCP (Dave Rickel) writes:
>Anyway, has any pop manufacturer stopped using high-fructose corn sweeteners
>as a result of this experiment?
>
I think corn is sweet enough as it is, and I believe the use of corn
sweeteners is nothing but a diversion.

Marty Smith

WD...@cunyvm.bitnet

unread,
Sep 12, 1986, 4:27:25 PM9/12/86
to
In article <1...@csustan.UUCP>, sm...@csustan.UUCP (Scott Hazen Mueller) says:

>Theodore Roosevelt (that's right, the President) way back when. Old TR was
>always a colorful sort... Once, when he was out hunting, he and his companions
>came across a bear caught in a beartrap. He refused to kill this bear and the
>story made the newspapers. Shortly after, a shopkeeper who had a stuffed
>bear for sale put the bear in his window with a sign "Teddy's Bear". Instant
>hit...
> \scott
>--
This one I KNOW as the shopkeeper in question was my great-grandfather.
The story goes like this:
Morris and Rose Michtom (the shopkeepers) saw a political carton by
Berryman (1st name escapes me) of TR refusing to kill a bear while hunting
in Louisianna and Rose stitched together the aforementioned bear. Then Morris
(as legend has it) wrote a letter to Roosevelt asking his permission to use
TR's name. Roosevelt (as legend also has it) wrote back saying he saw no
reason why his name would make any difference to the bear or the public, but,
nonetheless allowed the use of "Teddy's Bear" as noted above. It was enough
of a hit that Morris went on to found the IDEAL Toy Corporation on the strength
of the Teddy Bear.
/*--------------------------------------------------------------------*/
/* Bill Michtom - work: (212) 903-3685 home: (718) 788-5946 */
/* */
/* WDMCU@CUNYVM (Bitnet) Timelessness is transient */
/* BILL@BITNIC (Bitnet) */
/* */
/* Never blame on malice that which can be adequately */
/* explained by stupidity. */
/* I hate to advocate drugs, alcohol, violence or insanity to anyone, */
/* but they've always worked for me. - Hunter S. Thompson */
/*--------------------------------------------------------------------*/

Edward C. Bennett

unread,
Sep 13, 1986, 8:44:19 PM9/13/86
to
In article <1...@csustan.UUCP> sm...@csustan.UUCP (Scott Hazen Mueller) writes:

>In article <> hof...@hdsvx1.UUCP writes:
>>"Good to the Last Drop." I remember this as the old Maxwell House slogan.
>> Was this ever officially the Coke slogan? When did Maxwell start using it?
>
>This one I know. It was always a Maxwell House slogan. It originated with
>Theodore Roosevelt (that's right, the President) way back when. Old TR was
>always a colorful sort... Once, when he was out hunting, he and his companions
>came across a bear caught in a beartrap. He refused to kill this bear and the
>story made the newspapers. Shortly after, a shopkeeper who had a stuffed
>bear for sale put the bear in his window with a sign "Teddy's Bear". Instant
>hit...

Uh, what do Teddy bears have to do with Maxwell House coffee? Weren't you
supposed to regale us with a whimsical tale about how Maxwell made a
fortune with one of ol' Teddy's quips?

--
Edward C. Bennett

UUCP: ihnp4!cbosgd!ukma!ukecc!edward

Kentucky: The state that needs a lottery to educate it's children.

"Goodnight M.A."

Doug Landauer

unread,
Sep 23, 1986, 2:06:59 PM9/23/86
to
In article <6...@ukecc.UUCP> edw...@ukecc.UUCP (Edward C. Bennett) writes:
>
>Kentucky: The state that needs a lottery to educate it's children.
--------------------------------------------------------^
Kentucky: The state that needs USENET to educate its news posters.

Was this apostrophe put into this word on purpose (i.e., as a part
of the humorous content of your motto), or is it a typo, or is it
simply another example of an apostrophe that has been mistakenly
put into a word it doesn't belong in?

--
Doug Landauer Sun's Net: landauer@morocco
Phone: 415 691-7655 ARPANET (aka DDN): land...@sun.com
UUCP: {amdahl, decwrl, hplabs, seismo, ...}!sun!landauer

The man who will not read has no advantage over the man who cannot read.
-- Mark Twain

Chris Rhodes

unread,
Sep 23, 1986, 3:46:23 PM9/23/86
to
<==============~~< (my mental image of the lineeater...)

In article <6...@ukecc.UUCP> edw...@ukecc.UUCP (Edward C. Bennett) writes:

(some stuff about Maxwell House, and Roosevelt, and Teddy Bears.)

>
>Uh, what do Teddy bears have to do with Maxwell House coffee? Weren't you
>supposed to regale us with a whimsical tale about how Maxwell made a
>fortune with one of ol' Teddy's quips?
>
>--
>Edward C. Bennett
>
>UUCP: ihnp4!cbosgd!ukma!ukecc!edward
>
>Kentucky: The state that needs a lottery to educate it's children.

^^^^
are you sure there's
supposed to be an
appostrophe here?

>"Goodnight M.A."

/* Chris Rhodes / Shooting Shark
* Currently cowering behind lll-crg!csustan!guest
* real uucp : lll-crg!csuh!shark -or- lll-crg!ptsfa!harlie!shark
* My opinions *are* those of csustan! Yeah, they made me spokesman, ah,
*/ president of the university! Yeah, *that's* the ticket!

Mike Sullivan

unread,
Sep 29, 1986, 9:51:50 AM9/29/86
to

>In article <1...@csustan.UUCP> sm...@csustan.UUCP (Scott Hazen Mueller) writes:
>>In article <> hof...@hdsvx1.UUCP writes:
>>>"Good to the Last Drop." I remember this as the old Maxwell House slogan.
>>> Was this ever officially the Coke slogan? When did Maxwell start using it?
>>
>>This one I know. It was always a Maxwell House slogan. It originated with
.....
Gee, I always thought that "good to the last drop" was a bad slogan for a
parachute packing company. :-)
mumble ...
--
______
/ \ \
Michael J Sullivan / \____\ Alliant
decvax!linus!alliant!sullivan / / \ ComputerSystemsCorporation
/____/_______\

Fabbian G. Dufoe

unread,
Sep 29, 1986, 3:12:49 PM9/29/86
to
In article <1...@csustan.UUCP>, gu...@csustan.UUCP (Chris Rhodes) writes:
> <==============~~< (my mental image of the lineeater...)
>
> In article <6...@ukecc.UUCP> edw...@ukecc.UUCP (Edward C. Bennett) writes:
>
> (some stuff about Maxwell House, and Roosevelt, and Teddy Bears.)
>
> >Edward C. Bennett
> >
> >UUCP: ihnp4!cbosgd!ukma!ukecc!edward
> >
> >Kentucky: The state that needs a lottery to educate it's children.
> ^^^^
> are you sure there's
> supposed to be an
> appostrophe here?

Of course he's _sure_. The problem is that he's wrong anyway.

Fabbian Dufoe
350 Ling-A-Mor Terrace South
St. Petersburg, Florida 33705
813-823-2350

UUCP: ...akgua!akguc!codas!peora!ucf-cs!usfvax2!jc3b21!fgd3

Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages