Complex Arithmetic Library Wanted

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Douglas Robinson

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Apr 28, 1986, 1:29:55 PM4/28/86
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I am interested in a set of "C" language functions, suitable for
linking to analytical programs, which perform complex number
operations. I am interested in the fullest set possible.

Some time ago (late 1984?) I saw reference to such a treasure on
USENET, in net.physics or net.math. If the library refered to can
be resurrected and mailed to me, I would greatly appreciate it.

Douglas Robinson Jobs don't kill programmers... programmers kill jobs!
The Foxboro Company
MS-04-3A 617/543-8750
38 Neponset Avenue foxvax5!dbr
Foxboro, MA 02035
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Doug Robinson Jobs don't kill programmers... programmers kill jobs!

617/492-8810 ...!{mit-eddie, harvard, mirror}!cybvax0!dbr

#Bill_Stewart

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May 1, 1986, 9:34:46 PM5/1/86
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In article <10...@cybvax0.UUCP> d...@foxvax5.UUCP (Douglas Robinson) writes:
>I am interested in a set of "C" language functions, suitable for
>linking to analytical programs, which perform complex number
>operations. .....

>Some time ago (late 1984?) I saw reference to such a treasure on
>USENET, in net.physics or net.math. If the library refered to can
>be resurrected and mailed to me, I would greatly appreciate it.

Such libraries can be useful, but a much better approach is to get C++,
which allows you to define your own data types, and overload the
standard operators to work with them. Program development is a lot
faster when you can write
z0 = z1 + z2 * z3 * 3.141592;
instead of
z0 = c_add( z1, c_mul( c_mul( z2, z3 ), r_to_c( 3.141592 )));

Your programs also run faster because the complex functions can be
expanded in-line at compile time instead of using function calls.
The standard c++ libraries around here include data types for complex
numbers, character strings, and arrays with whole-array-at-once operators.

--
# Bill Stewart, AT&T Bell Labs 2G-202, Holmdel NJ 1-201-949-0705 ihnp4!ho95c!wcs

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