millibars

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SarahMe

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Aug 28, 2005, 6:08:50 PM8/28/05
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Can someone explain millibars and how that works in hurricaines?

thanks
Sarah


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SarahMe

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Aug 28, 2005, 6:09:40 PM8/28/05
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SarahMe

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Aug 28, 2005, 6:10:42 PM8/28/05
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Stephen Stein

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Aug 28, 2005, 6:59:10 PM8/28/05
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in article 8CqQe.4451$__1.24@trnddc07, SarahMe at sarahm...@verizen.net
wrote on 8/28/05 6:10 PM:

> Can someone explain millibars and how that works in hurricaines?

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barometric_pressure

Millibars is (are?) the metric equivalent of "pounds per square inch" or
"inches of mercury", a measure of air pressure, which is the weight of the
air in a column from sea-level up through the atmosphere.

"average" sea-level air pressure is about 14.7 pounds per square inch,
29.92" of mercury or about 1013 millibars.

One of the important things about air pressure in hurricanes is that air
pressure is what keeps the sea level down. The lower the air pressure, the
higher the sea level rises, which is the cause of the "storm surge".

Katrina's central pressure right now is estimated at 902 mb. I think the
lowest measured sea-level pressure was 870 in a typhoon in the Pacific. In
the US, I think the record is in the 890s.

- Steve Stein

MAK

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Aug 29, 2005, 9:50:20 PM8/29/05
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"SarahMe" <sarahm...@verizen.net> wrote in message
news:8CqQe.4451$__1.24@trnddc07...

After asking the same question 3 times, it's a little rude to not thank the
person who finally tried to give you an answer.


Ed

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Sep 16, 2005, 9:08:13 PM9/16/05
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"SarahMe" <sarahm...@verizen.net> wrote in news:4AqQe.4448$__1.3705
@trnddc07:

> Can someone explain millibars and how that works in hurricaines?
>
> thanks
> Sarah
>
>

Millibars is just a measure of atmospheric pressure. We are more used to
hearing that expressed in "inches". Generally, the lower the pressure, the
stronger the storm. A site for converting between inches and millibars can
be found here:

http://www.northshorewx.com/Utilities.asp

Click on "pressure" next to the blue bar on the left.

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