White Castle Belly Bombers?

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Lorne J. Covington

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Aug 9, 1994, 10:11:27 AM8/9/94
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Does any one know if there is a White Castles in the Boston Area?
If there is, then where?
--
Lorne J. Covington |lo...@soa.com
Studsvik of America |(617) 965-1819 (voice)
1087 Beacon St, Suite 301 |(617) 965-7549 (fax)
Newton, MA 02159 |

Ken Koellner

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Aug 9, 1994, 8:30:18 PM8/9/94
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In article <3282qf$1...@boston.soa.com>,

Lorne J. Covington <l...@hp735.soa.com> wrote:
>Does any one know if there is a White Castles in the Boston Area?
>If there is, then where?
>--

Sorry, I haven't found one. Being from Jersey I miss them a lot. I
think the lack of White Castles in NE was discussed here a few years
ago. You can get the frozen ones at many larger supermarkets though.

Jerry Natowitz

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Aug 11, 1994, 6:32:22 AM8/11/94
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In article <32bbph$a...@paperboy.osf.org>, Bruce Smith <bsm...@osf.org> wrote:
>
>Does anyone *really like* these things, or are people just trying to return
>to their glory days of yesteryear? I can state with certainty that a
>White Castle existed quite near the Rockaway Blvd. station of the IND in
>Queens, NYC, but I don't know whether it's still there. In any case, I have no
>intention of returning for so-called burgers or anything else. I admit to
>having eaten copious quantities of the things when I was young enough to
>digest them. Of course, I did *lots* of things then I wouldn't do now! ;-)

Although I realise that the things of one's past are often much better in
rememberence than in reality, the White castles I ate while in college in
Cincinnati were far superior to those sold in New Jersey. This may have
a lot to do with Cincinnati being much closer to the Corporate headquarters
(Columbus, Indiana) than NJ is.
--
Jerry Natowitz - j...@spdcc.com

Michael Crestohl

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Aug 10, 1994, 2:52:06 PM8/10/94
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The closest White Castle to Boston that I know is on Jericho Turnpike in
Mineola New York, although I'm certain there must be some in The Bronx or
Westchester County NY. Any yes, I have seen the frozen version being
sold in supermarkets - as far north as Vermont right up to the Canadian
border.

I used to really love 'em when I lived in Canada and could only get them
when I was visiting in the States. When I moved to the Boston area I was
a bit disappointed that they were not available here. Last June I took
my new wife to New York City and got her well prepared for a visit to a
White Castle. Well, the burgers were rubbery and tasted awful. They
were a bit smaller than I remember. I don't even like to think about the
cheeseburger my wife bravely tried. After not eating them in the
restaurant for a few years, the experience was unfortunately not a
pleasant one. I have tried the frozen ones at home and find that
steaming them is the best way to try to enjoy them and remember.

Michael Crestohl
m...@shore.net

Bruce Smith

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Aug 10, 1994, 4:02:57 PM8/10/94
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In article <32b7km$3...@shore.shore.net> m...@shore.shore.net (Michael Crestohl) writes:
>

>White Castle...Well, the burgers were rubbery and tasted awful. They

>were a bit smaller than I remember. I don't even like to think about the
>cheeseburger my wife bravely tried. After not eating them in the
>restaurant for a few years, the experience was unfortunately not a
>pleasant one. I have tried the frozen ones at home and find that
>steaming them is the best way to try to enjoy them and remember.
>

Does anyone *really like* these things, or are people just trying to return


to their glory days of yesteryear? I can state with certainty that a
White Castle existed quite near the Rockaway Blvd. station of the IND in
Queens, NYC, but I don't know whether it's still there. In any case, I have no
intention of returning for so-called burgers or anything else. I admit to
having eaten copious quantities of the things when I was young enough to
digest them. Of course, I did *lots* of things then I wouldn't do now! ;-)

Bruce Smith

Ken Koellner

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Aug 17, 1994, 10:47:54 AM8/17/94
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In article <32bbph$a...@paperboy.osf.org> bsm...@osf.org (Bruce Smith) writes:
>
>In article <32b7km$3...@shore.shore.net> m...@shore.shore.net (Michael Crestohl) writes:
>>
>
>>White Castle...Well, the burgers were rubbery and tasted awful. >>
>
>Does anyone *really like* these things, or are people just trying to return
>to their glory days of yesteryear?


I still like 'em. Maybe quality varies from store to store and that's
why some people who used to like them don't anymore.

--

There is no obstacle so great that it cannot be overcome
by the suitable application of DucTape and/or WD-40.

Jerry Natowitz

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Aug 18, 1994, 6:30:35 AM8/18/94
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In article <32t7uq$4...@hugo.sni-usa.com>, Ken Koellner <k...@sni-usa.com> wrote:
>In article <32bbph$a...@paperboy.osf.org> bsm...@osf.org (Bruce Smith) writes:
>>
>>In article <32b7km$3...@shore.shore.net> m...@shore.shore.net (Michael Crestohl) writes:
>>>
>>
>>>White Castle...Well, the burgers were rubbery and tasted awful. >>
>>
>>Does anyone *really like* these things, or are people just trying to return
>>to their glory days of yesteryear?
>
>
>I still like 'em. Maybe quality varies from store to store and that's
>why some people who used to like them don't anymore.

This is a compilation of a couple of email messages I sent about WC:


You actually hit the White Castle nail right on the head - they do steam them!
The process is an interesting one to watch: they have big griddles that they
cover with chopped onions (actually I think re-constituted dried onions).
They then lay out the patties on top of the onions. They then put the buns
on top, the bottom first, cut side down, then the top, cut side down.
They then put a hugh dome over the whole griddle and let them steam.
When they are done, they use a big metal spatula to scoop up a column of
the burgers. They somehow flip the bun tops off the column, invert the
rest onto a counter, put a pickle slice on each (no ketchup or mustard!),
and then pop the bun top onto each and drop it into a little cardboard box.

The whole process is manual, and yet quite efficient. They generally have the
grills behind a window that the customer queue goes past. White Castles
used to try and engender a family feeling amoung their employees - they
published a "House Organ" that was also avilable to customers (at least
in Cincinnati in the 70s). They are open 24 hours a day, 364 days a year
(closed Christmas). I often times would go at 3AM and marvel (in my
intoxicated state) at how many other people were there.

There are a few unusual features to White Castles (aka Whitey Castels
aka Porceline Palace):

1) The patties are square and have holes in them to cook evenly - hence the
additional nick-name of "Little Square Sewer Lids"

2) Despite being made from lean beef, they are still hard to digest,
so there are a few more nick-names: Tummy Torpedos, Duodenal Depth-charges,
and Rectal Rockets.

Jerry

P.S. Yes, I also liked them sober! I found the quality in the New Jersey
store to be much below the Cincinnati ones, even after they stopped
putting ketchup on them.

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