Thunderbird Privacy Policy - Input Requested

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Alex Fowler

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Aug 11, 2011, 1:37:40 PM8/11/11
to mozilla-g...@lists.mozilla.org, tlowe...@mozilla.com, l...@mozilla.com
Hi there -

We've created a new privacy policy for Thunderbird and are now
soliciting feedback before posting it online in the coming week.

Thanks, in advance, for taking the time to read through this document.

Alex

- - -

Mozilla Thunderbird
PRIVACY POLICY
Last Updated: August __, 2011

This privacy policy explains how Mozilla Corporation (“Mozilla”), a
wholly owned subsidiary of the non-profit Mozilla Foundation, collects
and uses information about users of the official Mozilla Thunderbird
messaging service (“Thunderbird”). It does not apply to other Mozilla
products or services, or to Mozilla’s websites or browser.

Overview

In this privacy policy, we address the following:
• Definitions of the Types of Information
• Information Collected by Thunderbird
• Information Thunderbird Sends to Websites and ISPs
• Tracking and Cookies
• Data Practices for Interactive Product Features
• What Mozilla Does to Secure Data
• Government and Court Demands for Information
• Overview of Other Situations Involving Possibility of Data
Disclosures
• Transfer of Data to the U.S.
• Mozilla’s Approach to Data Retention
• How Mozilla Discloses Changes to this Policy
• How to Contact Mozilla about this Policy

Types of Information

"Personal Information" is information that you provide to us that
personally identifies you, such as your name, phone number, or email
address. Except as described below, Mozilla does not collect or
require end-users of Thunderbird to provide Personal Information.

"Non-Personal Information" is information that cannot be directly
associated with a specific person or entity. Non-Personal Information
includes but is not limited to your computer’s configuration and the
version of Thunderbird you use.

"Potentially Personal Information is information that is Non-Personal
Information in and of itself but that could be used in conjunction
with other information to personally identify you. For example,
Uniform Resource Locators (“URLs”) (the addresses of web pages) or
Internet Protocol (“IP”) addresses (the addresses of computers on the
Internet), which are Non-Personal Information in and of themselves,
could be Personal Information when combined with Internet service
provider (“ISP”) records.

“Aggregate Data” is information that is recorded about users and
collected into groups so that it no longer reflects or references an
individually identifiable user.

Information Collected by Thunderbird

Thunderbird is a messaging system that allows users to integrate and
manage their online communications, whether that’s email or other
types of online messaging. Each Thunderbird user chooses which online
accounts he or she wishes to access using Thunderbird.

When you set up Thunderbird to access your email account, you will
need to enter your credentials for that account, such as your name,
email address, and password. Thunderbird stores these credentials on
your computer and does not transmit them to Mozilla.

Thunderbird also collects certain information about the email account
you are using to complete the account set-up process. This includes
your details of which servers to connect to and the types of protocol
they use. To simplify this set-up process, Thunderbird helps to locate
this information for you. Using the domain name from your email
address (e.g., for an email address of te...@example.com, the domain
name would be “example.com”), Thunderbird checks for the account set-
up information on the hard disk of your computer. If Thunderbird does
not locate this information on the hard disk, it may transmit the
domain name to Mozilla's servers and possibly to external DNS servers
to identify the settings required for your account. When this
information is transmitted, Mozilla or the DNS servers may store your
IP address and the domain requested.

Thunderbird does not transmit your name, full email address, or
password to Mozilla or to the DNS servers.

Thunderbird may store other information on your computer, including
information you enter in your Thunderbird address book and copies of
your email messages. Thunderbird stores this information locally on
your computer and does not transmit it to Mozilla.

Information Thunderbird Sends to Websites and ISPs

Thunderbird includes web-based functionalities, such as the ability to
subscribe to and view RSS feeds and for viewing web pages. By default,
Thunderbird will only view web pages based on Mozilla's servers,
unless they are contained in RSS feeds; third-party add-ons may cause
Thunderbird to access other servers. When you use these web-based
functions, Thunderbird sends Non-Personal and Potentially Personal
Information to the websites you access when requested by the website.
This may include, for example, the type of browser you are using, your
language preference, the referring site, and your IP address. This
information may be logged by the websites you access and the Internet
Service Provider you are using. What information is logged and how
that information is used depends on the policies of each of the
websites you visit and the ISPs you use.

Each website determines its own privacy practices for the distribution
and use of this Non- Personal Information and Potentially Personal
Information. If you are concerned about how a website will use this
information, check out its privacy policy. To find out more about how
Mozilla uses this information on its own websites and services, see
the Mozilla Privacy Policy.

Tracking and Cookies

When you use Thunderbird’s web-based functions to access a website,
the website may place cookies on your computer. A cookie is
information stored on your computer by a website you visit. Cookies
often store your settings for a website, such as your preferred
language or location. When you return to the site, Thunderbird sends
back the cookies that belong to the site. This allows the site to
present you with information customized to fit your needs. Cookies can
store a wide range of information, including personally identifiable
information (such as your name, home address, e-mail address, or
telephone number). Because of their ability to store Personal
Information, or references to such information, cookies can allow
websites to track the online movements of particular individuals.

Thunderbird itself does not set any cookies on behalf of Mozilla.
However, Mozilla may sometimes set cookies in accordance with the
Mozilla Privacy Policy, e.g. for the Blocklist (see below) or for
other website visits.

By default, the activities of storing and sending cookies are
invisible to you. However, you can change your Thunderbird settings to
allow you to approve or deny cookie storage requests, delete stored
cookies automatically when you close Thunderbird, and more.

Interactive Product Features

Add-ons Features. One thing that makes Thunderbird so flexible is the
ability for you to add various add-ons, extensions, and themes to
Thunderbird, thereby creating a custom messaging system that fits your
needs. The following features show how Thunderbird provides the
ability both to obtain additional add-ons easily and to protect
against potentially harmful add-ons.

Get Add-ons Page

Thunderbird offers a Get Add-ons page of the Add-ons Manager that
features popular add-ons and displays personalized recommendations
based on the add-ons you already have installed. This page can be
accessed by clicking on the “Get Add-ons” tab of the Thunderbird Add-
ons Manager. To display the personalized recommendations, Thunderbird
sends certain information to Mozilla, including the list of add-ons
you have installed, Thunderbird version information, and your IP
address. This communication only happens when the Get Add-ons area is
open and can be turned off at any time by opting out of Automatic
Updates from the Add-ons Manager.

Add-on Information and Searches

To keep the information displayed to you about your installed add-ons
up to date, Thunderbird communicates with Mozilla once a day to update
add-on descriptions, home pages, download counts, screenshots, and
ratings. This communication includes the list of add-ons you have
installed, Thunderbird version information, how long it took
Thunderbird to start up, and your IP address. You can turn off this
functionality at any time by opting out of Automatic Updates from the
Add-ons Manager.

If you enter keywords into the search field for the Add-ons Manager,
those keywords will be sent to Mozilla to perform the search, along
with Potentially Personal Information (such as IP address) normally
transferred to perform such functionality.

Automated Update Service. Thunderbird’s automatic update feature
periodically checks to see if an updated version of Thunderbird and
installed add-ons are available from Mozilla.

This feature sends Non-Personal Information to Mozilla, including the
version of Thunderbird you are using, build ID and target, update
channel, your language preference, and your operating system. This
feature also sends Potentially Personal Information to Mozilla in the
form of your IP address and a cookie that contains a unique numeric
value to distinguish individual Thunderbird installs. Mozilla uses
this information to provide you with updated versions of Thunderbird
and to understand the usage patterns of Thunderbird users. We use this
information to improve our products and services and to support
decision-making regarding feature and capacity planning.

Mozilla does not collect or track any Personal Information or any
information about the emails to send/receive or the websites you
visit, and Mozilla does not release the raw information we obtain from
these Thunderbird features to the public. We may release reports
containing Aggregate Data so that our global community can make better
product and design decisions. To prevent Mozilla from obtaining this
information, you can turn this feature off in Thunderbird’s
preferences.

Blocklist Feature. Thunderbird also offers a Blocklist feature. With
this feature, once a day Thunderbird does a regularly scheduled,
automatic check to see if you have any harmful add-ons or plug-ins
installed. If so, this feature disables add-ons or plug-ins that
Mozilla has determined contain known vulnerabilities or major user-
facing issues or fatal bugs (e.g., Thunderbird crashes on startup or
something causes an endless loop). You may view the current list of
Blocklisted items. This feature sends Non-Personal Information to
Mozilla, including the version of Thunderbird you are using, operating
system version, build ID and target, update channel, and your language
preference. This feature also sends Potentially Personal Information
to Mozilla in the form of your IP address and a cookie. In addition,
Mozilla also uses this feature to analyze Thunderbird usage patterns
so we may improve our products and services, including planning
features and capacity. Currently there is no basic user interface to
disable the Blocklist feature.

An article in our Thunderbird Knowledge Base explains how you may
disable the Blocklist feature and these instructions apply to
Thunderbird as well. Disabling the Blocklist feature is not
recommended as it may result in using extensions known to be
untrustworthy.

Crash-Reporting Feature. Thunderbird has a crash-reporting feature
that sends a report to Mozilla when Thunderbird crashes. Mozilla uses
the information in the crash reports to diagnose and correct the
problems in Thunderbird that caused the crash. Though this feature
starts automatically after Thunderbird crashes, it does not send
information to Mozilla until you explicitly authorize it to do so.

By default, this feature sends a variety of Non-Personal Information
to Mozilla, including the stack trace (a detailed description of which
parts of the Thunderbird code were active at the time of the crash)
and the type of computer you are using. Additional information is
collected by the crash reporting feature. With Thunderbird’s crash
reporting feature, you have the option to include Personal Information
(including your email address), Potentially Personal Information
(including your IP address and the URL of the site you were visiting
when Thunderbird crashed), and a comment. Thunderbird Crash Reporter
also sends a list of all add-ons that you were using at the time of
the crash, the time since (i) the last crash, (ii) the last install,
and (iii) the start-up of the program. Mozilla only makes Non-Personal
Information (i.e., generic information about your computer, the stack
trace, and any comment given by the user) available in the public
reports available online at http://crash-stats.mozilla.com/.

Personas Feature. Thunderbird’s Personas feature is a theme that lets
you personalize the look of Thunderbird.

Applying Personas

When you apply a Persona to Thunderbird, Mozilla collects your IP
address, the date and time you applied the Persona to Thunderbird, and
the url you used to make the application as well as the url you were
visiting immediately before that (known as the “referrer” url).

Creating a Custom Persona

If you are creating a Custom Persona for your own use, Mozilla does
not collect any Personal Information.

Contributing a Design to the Personas Gallery

The Personas gallery is where you can browse all the available
designs. If you contribute a design or image (each a “Persona”) to the
Personas gallery, Mozilla collects the following Personal Information:
(1) your username and (2) your email address. Your username will be
used to attribute your Persona to you and will be publicly available
on the Personas gallery. You do not have to provide your real name;
you can use a nickname or avatar. Mozilla will not make your email
address publicly available without your consent or share it with any
third parties other than Mozilla’s service providers. Mozilla will use
your email address only to contact you regarding your design or to
provide any additional information that you elect or opt in to
receive.

Personas’ Interactive Product Features

After you have selected your Persona, it is stored on your computer.
Once per day the Personas service checks to see if your selected
Persona has been updated. This feature sends the same information that
web browsers typically transfer with any HTTP requests including user
agent and your IP address.

We use this information to improve our products and services and to
support decision making regarding feature and capacity planning.
Mozilla is an open organization that believes in sharing as much
information as possible about its products, its operations, and its
associations. Accordingly, we may release public reports containing
Aggregate Data so that our global community and Personas partners may
make better product and design decisions. For example, we think it is
good for users of Personas to know which are the most popular Personas
and Personas designers to know how many times their Persona was
downloaded.

Security

Mozilla is committed to protecting your Personal Information from
unauthorized access, alteration, disclosure, or destruction. We
undertake a range of security measures including physical access
restraints, technical security monitoring, and internal security
reviews of the environment. We also have policies in place to prohibit
employees from viewing Personal Information without business
justification. Additionally, it is our policy to ensure that Mozilla
employees and contractors are bound by confidentiality obligations.

Secure Website Certificate Verification. When you visit a secure
website or access secure remote content via emails, Thunderbird may
check with any status provider mentioned in the certificate to
validate that website’s certificate. Thunderbird sends only the
certificate identification to the certificate provider, not the exact
URL you are visiting. Sending these verification requests to third
parties is sometimes necessary to ensure your connection to a site is
secure; to help maintain your security, Thunderbird may block access
to the site if it can't verify your connection using the third party.
If the certificate is no longer valid, you will receive an error page
that states why the certificate is not valid and you will not be able
to access that website. The technical name for this process is OCSP or
On-line Certificate Status Protocol. You may disable online
certificate verification in Thunderbird's preferences (Mac) / options
(PC) under the encryption tab. If you do this, none of the information
discussed here will be sent to any third party certificate provider.
An article in our Thunderbird Knowledge Base gives you information
about changing your preferences (Mac) / options (PC) and these
instructions apply to Thunderbird too. However, if you choose to
disable the online verification feature, Thunderbird will not be able
to confirm the identity of the website you are visiting, which may put
you at greater risk of having your private information intercepted. In
this case, Thunderbird will also not show the identity of the website
in the URL bar.

Legal Process and Other Disclosures

Consistent with our privacy commitments, we will scrutinize third
party requests for information about you for compliance with the law,
including those coming from governmental agencies or civil litigants.
We may access, use, preserve or disclose information about you only
when we have a good faith belief that it is reasonably necessary to do
so to satisfy the applicable law, regulation, legal process or lawful
governmental request of any country, or to protect the rights,
property or safety of Mozilla, its users or the public. We will
provide notice of legal process or governmental requests unless
prohibited to do so by law or the circumstances warrant otherwise.

Other Disclosures

In certain other limited situations, Mozilla may disclose your
Personal Information, such as when necessary to protect our websites
and operations (e.g., against attacks); to protect the rights,
privacy, safety, or property of Mozilla or its users; to enforce our
terms of service; and to pursue available legal remedies.
Additionally, Mozilla may need to transfer Personal Information to an
affiliate or successor in the event of a change of our corporate
structure or status, such as in the event of a restructuring, sale, or
bankruptcy.

What and When We Share with Third Parties

Mozilla’s policy is to make Personal Information, such as your name
and email address, and Potentially Personal Information, such as the
URL of the site you last visited, only available to its employees,
contractors, and selected contributors who signed confidentiality
agreements that prohibit them from using or disclosing such
information other than for approved Mozilla purposes.

We also work with third parties who provide infrastructure or back-end
services (like content delivery networks, bandwidth providers, and
services of an administrative nature). We may share Personal
Information about you with such third parties for the purpose of
enabling these third parties to provide such services.

Transfer of Data to the U.S.

Mozilla is a global organization and operates in different countries.
Privacy laws and common practices vary from country to country. Some
countries may provide for less legal protection of your personal data;
others may provide more legal protection. By using Thunderbird, you
consent to the transfer of the information collected, as outlined by
this Policy, to Mozilla or its third party service providers in the
United States, the Netherlands, and other places where our
distributed, third party content delivery network exists (which is in
several countries around the world), which countries may provide a
lesser level of data protection than in your country of residence.

Data Retention

We will retain any information collected for the period necessary to
fulfil the purposes outlined in this Policy unless a longer retention
period is required by law and/or regulations.

Privacy Policy Changes

Mozilla may change the Thunderbird Privacy Policy from time to time.
Any and all changes will be reflected on this page. Substantive
changes may also be announced through the standard mechanisms by which
Mozilla communicates with its users and community, such as Mozilla's
"announce" mailing list and newsgroup. It is your responsibility to
ensure that you understand the terms of this Privacy Policy. You
should periodically check this page for any changes to the current
policy.

For More Information

You may request access, correction, or deletion of Personal
Information or Potentially Personal Information, as permitted by law.
We will seek to comply with such requests, provided that we have
sufficient information to identify the Personal Information or
Potentially Personal Information related to you.

Any such requests or other questions or concerns regarding this Policy
and Mozilla's data protection practices should be addressed to:

Mozilla Corporation
Attn: Legal Notices - Privacy
650 Castro Street, Suite 300
Mountain View, CA 94041-2072
Phone: +1-650-903-0800
E-mail: pri...@mozilla.com

JoeS

unread,
Aug 13, 2011, 9:40:41 AM8/13/11
to gover...@lists.mozilla.org
On 8/11/2011 1:37 PM, Alex Fowler wrote:
> Hi there -
>
> We've created a new privacy policy for Thunderbird and are now
> soliciting feedback before posting it online in the coming week.
>
> Thanks, in advance, for taking the time to read through this document.
>
> Alex
>
> - - -
>

I have an nntp and a list response waiting in the moderator queue for
the last 20+ hours. Trying here after subscribing. It's go0d that this
is not time sensitive material. :)

On 8/11/2011 1:37 PM, Alex Fowler wrote:
> Get Add-ons Page
>
> Thunderbird offers a Get Add-ons page of the Add-ons Manager that
> features popular add-ons and displays personalized recommendations
> based on the add-ons you already have installed. This page can be
> accessed by clicking on the “Get Add-ons” tab of the Thunderbird Add-
> ons Manager. To display the personalized recommendations, Thunderbird
> sends certain information to Mozilla, including the list of add-ons
> you have installed, Thunderbird version information, and your IP
> address. This communication only happens when the Get Add-ons area is
> open and can be turned off at any time by opting out of Automatic
> Updates from the Add-ons Manager.
>
> Add-on Information and Searches
>
> To keep the information displayed to you about your installed add-ons
> up to date, Thunderbird communicates with Mozilla once a day to update
> add-on descriptions, home pages, download counts, screenshots, and
> ratings. This communication includes the list of add-ons you have
> installed, Thunderbird version information, how long it took
> Thunderbird to start up, and your IP address. You can turn off this
> functionality at any time by opting out of Automatic Updates from the
> Add-ons Manager.

Both of these sections need to be updated with the new changes that were
added in https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=664845

Specifically, the link to how you _really_ can opt out.
http://blog.mozilla.com/addons/how-to-opt-out-of-add-on-metadata-updates/

--
JoeS Using TB 8.0

JoeS

unread,
Aug 12, 2011, 5:00:39 PM8/12/11
to gover...@lists.mozilla.org
On 8/11/2011 1:37 PM, Alex Fowler wrote:
> Hi there -
>
> We've created a new privacy policy for Thunderbird and are now
> soliciting feedback before posting it online in the coming week.
>
> Thanks, in advance, for taking the time to read through this document.
>
> Alex
>
> - - -
>

I have an nntp response waiting in the moderator queue for the last 20+
hours. Trying here with a list response. It's godd that this is not time
sensitive material. :)

On 8/11/2011 1:37 PM, Alex Fowler wrote:

> Get Add-ons Page
>
> Thunderbird offers a Get Add-ons page of the Add-ons Manager that
> features popular add-ons and displays personalized recommendations
> based on the add-ons you already have installed. This page can be
> accessed by clicking on the “Get Add-ons” tab of the Thunderbird Add-
> ons Manager. To display the personalized recommendations, Thunderbird
> sends certain information to Mozilla, including the list of add-ons
> you have installed, Thunderbird version information, and your IP
> address. This communication only happens when the Get Add-ons area is
> open and can be turned off at any time by opting out of Automatic
> Updates from the Add-ons Manager.
>
> Add-on Information and Searches
>
> To keep the information displayed to you about your installed add-ons
> up to date, Thunderbird communicates with Mozilla once a day to update
> add-on descriptions, home pages, download counts, screenshots, and
> ratings. This communication includes the list of add-ons you have
> installed, Thunderbird version information, how long it took
> Thunderbird to start up, and your IP address. You can turn off this
> functionality at any time by opting out of Automatic Updates from the
> Add-ons Manager.

Both of these sections need to be updated with the new changes that were
added in https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=664845

Specifically, the link to how you _really_ can opt out.
http://blog.mozilla.com/addons/how-to-opt-out-of-add-on-metadata-updates/

--
JoeS Using TB 8.0

--
JoeS

Blake Winton

unread,
Aug 12, 2011, 5:15:10 PM8/12/11
to mozilla-g...@lists.mozilla.org
I mostly like it, but have a couple of questions/comments.

On 11-08-11 13:37 , Alex Fowler wrote:
> This privacy policy explains how Mozilla Corporation (“Mozilla”), a
> wholly owned subsidiary of the non-profit Mozilla Foundation, collects
> and uses information about users of the official Mozilla Thunderbird
> messaging service (“Thunderbird”).

I haven't really thought about Thunderbird as a "messaging service". I
thought it was more a "messaging client"… (I also think that when we
make it a service, we might want to go over the privacy policy to see if
it still makes sense.)

> "Personal Information" is information that you provide to us that
> personally identifies you, such as your name, phone number, or email
> address. Except as described below, Mozilla does not collect or
> require end-users of Thunderbird to provide Personal Information.
>
> "Non-Personal Information" is information that cannot be directly
> associated with a specific person or entity. Non-Personal Information
> includes but is not limited to your computer’s configuration and the
> version of Thunderbird you use.

Does Mozilla require users to provide NPI? (The preceding paragraph
mentions whether or not we do.)

> Thunderbird is a messaging system

We said above that it was a messaging service, should we use the same
wording here?

> When you set up Thunderbird to access your email account, you will
> need to enter your credentials for that account, such as your name,
> email address, and password. Thunderbird stores these credentials on
> your computer and does not transmit them to Mozilla.

Thunderbird will transmit them to the provider for that account.

> Thunderbird also collects certain information about the email account
> you are using to complete the account set-up process. This includes
> your details of which servers to connect to and the types of protocol
> they use. To simplify this set-up process, Thunderbird helps to locate
> this information for you. Using the domain name from your email
> address (e.g., for an email address of te...@example.com, the domain
> name would be “example.com”), Thunderbird checks for the account set-
> up information on the hard disk of your computer. If Thunderbird does
> not locate this information on the hard disk, it may transmit the
> domain name to Mozilla's servers and possibly to external DNS servers
> to identify the settings required for your account. When this
> information is transmitted, Mozilla or the DNS servers may store your
> IP address and the domain requested.

It may also contact servers at example.com to discover this information.
(In fact, it will contact the example.com servers before it contacts
any Mozilla servers, but I don't know if that matters for this document.)

> Mozilla is a global organization and operates in different countries.
> Privacy laws and common practices vary from country to country. Some
> countries may provide for less legal protection of your personal data;
> others may provide more legal protection. By using Thunderbird, you
> consent to the transfer of the information collected, as outlined by
> this Policy, to Mozilla or its third party service providers in the
> United States, the Netherlands, and other places where our
> distributed, third party content delivery network exists (which is in
> several countries around the world), which countries may provide a
> lesser level of data protection than in your country of residence.

We talk about information collected by Thunderbird, and not sent to
Mozilla. I assume that this information won't be sent to Mozilla's
third-party service providers in the US/Netherlands/etc… but it might be
better to spell this out.

> Data Retention
>
> We will retain any information collected for the period necessary to
> fulfil the purposes outlined in this Policy unless a longer retention

typo: fulfill

Later,
Blake.

Archaeopteryx

unread,
Aug 12, 2011, 3:25:02 PM8/12/11
to mozilla-g...@lists.mozilla.org
Alex Fowler:

> Each website determines its own privacy practices for the distribution
> and use of this Non- Personal Information and Potentially Personal
> Information.
Remove whitespace > "Non-Personal"

> Blocklist Feature.


> In addition,
> Mozilla also uses this feature to analyze Thunderbird usage patterns
> so we may improve our products and services, including planning
> features and capacity.

This sound somehow to gloomy for users. As far as I know, it's used for
creating statistics which applications version are used on what kind of
operating systems (and also in what kind of languages). No internal
usage by the user (like what kind of message subjects, feeds or
newsgroups exist in the profile) are being sent. (Or am I mistaken?)

> Data Retention
>
> fulfil
'fulfill' recommended (my dictionary claims this is the American English
version).

In general, sometimes 's is used, sometimes ´s.

Archaeopteryx

JoeS

unread,
Aug 11, 2011, 8:05:55 PM8/11/11
to mozilla-g...@lists.mozilla.org
On 8/11/2011 1:37 PM, Alex Fowler wrote:
> Get Add-ons Page
>
> Thunderbird offers a Get Add-ons page of the Add-ons Manager that
> features popular add-ons and displays personalized recommendations
> based on the add-ons you already have installed. This page can be
> accessed by clicking on the “Get Add-ons” tab of the Thunderbird Add-
> ons Manager. To display the personalized recommendations, Thunderbird
> sends certain information to Mozilla, including the list of add-ons
> you have installed, Thunderbird version information, and your IP
> address. This communication only happens when the Get Add-ons area is
> open and can be turned off at any time by opting out of Automatic
> Updates from the Add-ons Manager.
>
> Add-on Information and Searches
>
> To keep the information displayed to you about your installed add-ons
> up to date, Thunderbird communicates with Mozilla once a day to update
> add-on descriptions, home pages, download counts, screenshots, and
> ratings. This communication includes the list of add-ons you have
> installed, Thunderbird version information, how long it took
> Thunderbird to start up, and your IP address. You can turn off this
> functionality at any time by opting out of Automatic Updates from the
> Add-ons Manager.

Both of these sections need to be updated with the new changes that were

Mark Banner

unread,
Aug 30, 2011, 10:47:07 AM8/30/11
to mozilla-g...@lists.mozilla.org
On 12/08/2011 20:25, Archaeopteryx wrote:
>> Blocklist Feature.
>> In addition,
>> Mozilla also uses this feature to analyze Thunderbird usage patterns
>> so we may improve our products and services, including planning
>> features and capacity.
> This sound somehow to gloomy for users. As far as I know, it's used for
> creating statistics which applications version are used on what kind of
> operating systems (and also in what kind of languages). No internal
> usage by the user (like what kind of message subjects, feeds or
> newsgroups exist in the profile) are being sent. (Or am I mistaken?)

Just before that bit you quoted is this bit:

> This feature sends Non-Personal Information to Mozilla, including the version
> of Thunderbird you are using, operating system version, build ID and target,
> update channel, and your language preference. This feature also sends
Potentially
> Personal Information to Mozilla in the form of your IP address and a
cookie.

So no, it doesn't send internal usage.

Mark.

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