need a bit of help

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Paul Hartman

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May 18, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/18/96
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I have some characters in my novel-in-progress who like to eat, but
I'm finding that none of the descriptions of food flavors that I'm coming up
with satisfy me at all. If anyone could recommend a few sources that I could
use as models/inspiration, I will be very grateful. The kinds of food in
question are such things as fresh baked break, fresh made butter, the flavors
of berries in the fresh air after a long walk, things that I thought would be
simple but are not, at least thus far.
thanks
paul

Sandy Fleming

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May 18, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/18/96
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In article <4nlbm2$c...@omnifest.uwm.edu>, Paul Hartman
<har...@omnifest.uwm.edu> writes

I found what you've written here, "Fresh baked bread, fresh made butter,
the flavors of berries in the fresh air after a long walk," very
evocative. Perhaps there's no need to get into any long descriptions or
purple prose over this? Replace the third "fresh" with "open" and cut
out "the flavors of", and it works very well for me.
--
Sandy "Salivating" Fleming

claguire

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May 18, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/18/96
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In article <4nlbm2$c...@omnifest.uwm.edu>, har...@omnifest.uwm.edu (Paul
Hartman) wrote:

> I have some characters in my novel-in-progress who like to eat, but
> I'm finding that none of the descriptions of food flavors that I'm coming up
> with satisfy me at all. If anyone could recommend a few sources that I could
> use as models/inspiration, I will be very grateful. The kinds of food in
> question are such things as fresh baked break, fresh made butter, the flavors
> of berries in the fresh air after a long walk, things that I thought would be
> simple but are not, at least thus far.

Just say _what_ they are eating, perhaps in some detail, and you will make
people hungry. Add action; mention that someone is chewing the fresh
baked bread (which brings out the texture in the reader's mind), and that
they smell the berries (you don't need to say HOW they smell, just that
they smell the raspberries), and that they spread a thick swath of butter
of the the slab of bread. (_I'm_ getting hungry....)

Another thing is to bring other senses into it. Is something warm, hot,
cold? Can you hear it? (Crackling in the pan, cruching in your mouth,
bubbling in your cup).

One of my favorite "food" authors is Brian Jacques, who writes High Heroic
Fantasies about rodents. The mice of Redwall Abbey have feasts of amazing
proportions. Even if you don't like the style of story (they are kind of
like Conan the Barbarian as written by Beatrix Potter, then made into a
movie co-directed by Frank Capra and Steven Speilberg), there is usually a
feast described somewhere in the first chapters.

Camille

Mark Manning

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May 18, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/18/96
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In article <4nlbm2$c...@omnifest.uwm.edu> har...@omnifest.uwm.edu (Paul Hartman) writes:
>Date: 18 May 1996 15:24:34 -0500

> I have some characters in my novel-in-progress who like to eat, but
>I'm finding that none of the descriptions of food flavors that I'm coming up
>with satisfy me at all.

I think it depends on what you are trying to accomplish as to which
techniques you should use. Are these part part of a description meant to
set the mood of a scene, or is this character development? The best, of
course, would be to combine the two.

With that in mind, one thing you might try is, instead of trying to describe
flavors, show the character's enjoyment of the food. This shows the reader
something about your characters and can also set the mood of the scene.

If you want to take a look at a descriptive passage where the sights and
smell of food play an important roll in setting the scene, check out
Dicken's "A Christmas Carol". There is an excellent example in the
Christmas dinner scene at Bob Cratchit's house in "The Second of Three
Spirits" section.

Good luck

Mark

Thought for Today: "Life is far too depressing to be taken seriously."

Roy Blumenthal

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May 19, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/19/96
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> I'm finding that none of the descriptions of food flavors that I'm coming up
> with satisfy me at all. If anyone could recommend a few sources that I could
> use as models/inspiration, I will be very grateful.

Hiya Paul...

Here's a great resource on the world wide web...

"A Writer's Treasury of Smell" by Gerard J Gormley.
http://www.shore.net/~jerryg/smells.html

Smells are very intimately related to flavours, so go check it out.

But, on another note, I think you would do far better by trying to
describe how YOU experience the flavours in question. If you're using
someone else's experience, it's probably not going to mesh well with your
other descriptions. So beware. If you use material from the Treasury of
Smell, rework it so it becomes your own.

Blue skies
Roy
--
.oooO
( ) barefoo...@pixie.co.za | PO Box 1914
\ ( http://www.pix.za/barefoot.press/ | Midrand 1685
\_) Roy Blumenthal, Editor | South Africa

Larry Bassel/Barbara Frezza

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May 20, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/20/96
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In <319FA1...@pixie.co.za> Roy Blumenthal

<roy.blu...@pixie.co.za> writes:
>
>> I'm finding that none of the descriptions of food flavors that I'm
coming up
>> with satisfy me at all. If anyone could recommend a few sources that
I could
>> use as models/inspiration, I will be very grateful.
>
Read anything written by M.K. Fisher

BMF

M Barnard

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May 20, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/20/96
to

In article <4nlbm2$c...@omnifest.uwm.edu>,
har...@omnifest.uwm.edu (Paul Hartman) wrote:
> I have some characters in my novel-in-progress who like to eat, but
>I'm finding that none of the descriptions of food flavors that I'm coming up
>with satisfy me at all. If anyone could recommend a few sources that I could
>use as models/inspiration, I will be very grateful. The kinds of food in
>question are such things as fresh baked break, fresh made butter, the flavors
>of berries in the fresh air after a long walk, things that I thought would be
>simple but are not, at least thus far.

A few months ago I ran across this posting. This seems like the opportune
time to share it. Thank you, Margaret Logan, where ever you are.

M
--------------------------------

From: QHU...@prodigy.com (Margaret Logan)
Subject: Food Glossary/Poetry
Date: 18 Dec 1994 13:27:23 GMT


The following is a the beginning of a food glossary that should
grow if everyone contributes the most perfect description of
their most favourite foods. The words to describe the food item
should be carefully chosen. Each paragraph should begin with the
main food item to be described. You can add to any existing
paragraph, particularly if your favourite food has not been done
justice by the description. Some of the descriptions below are
from famous writers of the past, such as Proust and Colette and
contemporary writers too. Most are just snippets... a few words
picked up from advertisements, restaurant reviews, contributions
from friends etc. These food jewels are intended to be for the
shared pleasure of everyone who adores words and food. Be
forewarned! Read this glossary at your peril if you haven't eaten
in the last three hours. And then add to it for the pleasure of
fellow foodies.

Apples: Cooked with cinnamon so they were transformed into a
translucent caramel;

Asparagus: Pencil thin, the colour of just-budding leaves

Aspic: Enormous crystals of aspic, like transparent blocks of
quartz (Proust);

Basil: Perfumed with basil

Beans: Big, silk-textured butter beans shimmering in their
juices

Beef, Corned: mouth-watering, briny pickled-beef, gliding off
the machine into hot brick-red heaps; The rosy
fibers surrendering a lush bouquet of flavour
(Stern);

Breads: Thick crusted; Fragile white rolls redolent of the
yeast that puffed them high only moments earlier; seed-
specked sour-crusted rye bread; sourdough...liberated
its acidic fragrance; Warm scones studded with raisins;
cinnamon roll...stout spiral packed with raisins and
cinnamon sugar, its speckled wheaty dough warm and
tender, glistening on top with sugar frosting in a
sticky, mahogany glaze; tweedy whole grain bread;

Broth: Shimmering clear

Champagne: murmur of foam, leaping pearls of air (Collette)

Chicken (Roasted): with a skin "gold-embroidered like a
chasuble" --Proust. Roasted to a golden,
crackling finish;

Chili: Chili-zapped mint sauce;

Chocolate Cake: sensuous warm chocolate cake spangled with
shards of pecan praline

Coleslaw: thin shreds of green cabbage showered with
handfuls of minced parsley

Coriander: Coriander-flecked rice

Corn Bread: so buttery-rich that they made our fingers glisten
when we picked them up (Stern);

Cucumber: Tissue thin slices

Custard Pie: eggy, aromatic, jiggling precariously and oh-so-
sweet

Duck: Crackly skinned and succulent;

Eggplant: meltingly tender;

Foie Gras: diamonds of parsleyed foie gras in aspic and warm
buttery brioche toast to spread them on.

Frittata: A mile-high wedge of fluffy oven-omelette

Garlic: The gentle aroma of garlic;pungent, heavy, earthy
garlic; in a creamy suspension; something sublime is
born; an elixir... the blending of oil and garlic

Gnocchi: little dumplings that are simultaneously chewy and
tender...As light and tender as the law of gravity
allows; airy and luscious in a sauce of four cheeses

Goat Cheese: Creamy, airy with a mild sharpness

Ham: Slabs of salty cured ... Gorgeous: deep-dark red, dry
textured but beaded with moisture, rimmed with crystalline
amber fat with a majestic, lusty, complex, mouth-watering
taste (Stern);

Lamb: herbed loin of lamb sliced and shingled over creamy
wild-mushroom polenta; Noisettes of lamb... pieces of
pink perfection

Lamb: Tender rack of lamb, its jus infused with rosemary and
thickened with a purée of roasted garlic;

Lasagnette: tender handkerchiefs of fresh pasta casually
unfolded in a bowl with broccoli rabe and garlic
and moistened with a little broth

Latkes: Ovoid and hard crusted but tender inside;

Moussaka: A rich and wonderous layering of eggplant and ground
beef or lamb buried under a mantle of bechamel sauce.

Mushrooms: Earthy, rich and melting;

Olives: The delicious salty and fruity richness of olives is
heightened by an astringency that is more or less
bitter.

Parsley: Jade green flat leafed parsley, emulsified with a dash
of cream alone sauces perfect textured sea bass...

Peas: Diminutive crowder peas whose insides wanted to burst
from their taut skins;

Pie: A lattice crust woven in intricate patterns across a sea of
sweet blueberry or ambrosial peach, each segment was crisp
and melting, studded with just the right amount of sugar,
and browned to perfection.

Pizza: Crispy-thin, yeasty crust infused with olive oil,
grilled until it crackles, and topped with miminalist
touches--tomatoes, fresh herbs--that add bursts of
intense color and flavour without weight.

Potatoes: Whipped smooth with plenty of butter and milk, thick
and deeply potato flavoured, and improved more by a
mantle of roasted garlic puree; creamy horseradish-
spiked mashed potatoes; satiny vinaigrette dressed
potatoes;

Prosciutto: Paper-thin slices draped fine as silk scarves
Puff Pastry: Expert flaky, puff pastry
Ambrosial crust, audibly crisp when a knife bears
down, yet melt in your mouth rich; Pastry flakes
that vaporize at the approach of a fork; a lush
crust that cleaves into see-through flakes;

Sauces: Rosemary-touched tomato sauce;

Scrapple: a thick, sun-coloured slice of cooked cornmeal,
unctuous with cheese, studded with black beans

Shrimp: Fried shrimp girdled in breading

Sorrel: Tongues of sorrel

Spareribs: intensely flavoured of honey and garlic

Steak: A massive portion with fat and flecks of charred bone,
bits of marrow and shreds of sweet flesh, the sweetest
meat lying near the bone.

Stilton Cheese: Buttery, creamy and salty; Has a yellowish
cast to the creamy whiteness, flecked with
pale bluish-green veins; a morsel of Stilton
cleaving to the pale inner ribs of celery

Sweetbreads: Crackle crusted

Tarts: Jewel-like raspberry, kiwi, or mandarin orange tarts.

Tea, Iced: A rich burnt-umber in colour and clear as spring
water

Trout: angler's paradise...chunky-fleshed, sweet and moist and
gilded with butter

Vodka: Clear as rainwater

Wine: like a rich cascade of red jewels (Proust);

Zabaglione: the airy yet smoothly substantial and satisfying
volume of the filling

-
MARGARET LOGAN QHU...@prodigy.com or mlo...@veda.org


bar...@io.org - http://www.io.org/~barnard/web/barnard.htm -
"Old wood to burn! Old wine to drink! Old friends to trust!
Old authors to read!" Francis Bacon

Jensen

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May 20, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/20/96
to

>In <319FA1...@pixie.co.za> Roy Blumenthal
><roy.blu...@pixie.co.za> writes:
>>

>>> I'm finding that none of the descriptions of food flavors that I'm
>coming up
>>> with satisfy me at all. If anyone could recommend a few sources that
>I could
>>> use as models/inspiration, I will be very grateful.
>>

Not sure if I've attributed correctly (but since this will be an innocuous
post, who cares <G>?).

The best exercise I ever did for describing food was this:

In a childrens' story I wrote involving faeries, the protagonist and her
faerie friends shared a meal of mushroom pie. In order to describe the taste
of mushroom pie (which would be repugnant to most children), I made one. When
it had cooled off enough to slice, I sat down and ate piece after piece until
I found the right words. It only took me three pieces and I had a nice lunch
out of the deal <g>.

jen
(but next time, it will be pecan pie or shoofly pie or something heavenly like
that)

===============
Accessible Computer Systems
http://www.peavine.com/~acs/acs.html

Hound of Cullen

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May 21, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/21/96
to

In article <4nlbm2$c...@omnifest.uwm.edu>,
har...@omnifest.uwm.edu (Paul Hartman) wrote:
> I have some characters in my novel-in-progress who like to eat, but
>I'm finding that none of the descriptions of food flavors that I'm coming up
>with satisfy me at all. If anyone could recommend a few sources that I could
>use as models/inspiration, I will be very grateful. The kinds of food in
>question are such things as fresh baked break, fresh made butter, the flavors
>of berries in the fresh air after a long walk, things that I thought would be
>simple but are not, at least thus far.

First, some suggested reading: M.F.K. Fisher and James Beard (naturally)
for the basics. Patrick O'Brien, in his "Aubrey-Maturin" novels,
describes some wonderful feasts. (I'm drawing a blank on others right
now...)

Second, what are you trying to do with the food descriptions? Meals are
usually much more than good food, they are a time to socialize, a time for
you to convey more about your characters. If they are dining out, how do
they treat the waiters? Do they delight in all the food put before them
or are they picky? (You know the type, "nouveau cuisine" snobs who
wouldn't touch a perfectly grilled hamburger or anything that hasn't been
plated properly).

You might be relying too much on the descriptions of the food to carry the
scene. Try putting the words in your character's mouths ("Try the salmon,
it is wonderfully tender") so that you're not describing their reactions
so much. This is something that P.O'Brian does wonderfully. The meals of
his characters are social events, and most of his commentary on the food
is in the dialogue. Read some of his books, you'll be impressed.

Hound

--
Romeo and Juliet *died*. I always liked that in a teen romance story.
James Nicoll

claguire

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May 21, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/21/96
to

Another good food writer: Calvin Trillin

His food essays are humor, but he sure can make you hungry. He has taken
on the persona of a glutton, and when you read his essays, you want to eat
LOTS of good food. So, if you want to give that impression, read
him--because he does it without effusive descriptions of the food. (He
even has an essay about menu writing, and what he thinks of those
restaurants that have more creativity in their menus than in their food.)

Camille

VEI

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May 23, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/23/96
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Patrick O'Brien as a model of food-writing! I don't know.

I would have mentioned the scenes with Levin and Oblonsky sharing
restaurant meals in "Anna Karenina." Lots of examples of characters
and events being expressed through descriptions of food and eating.
(Levin expresses shock at the thought of commiting adultery, comparing
it with the act of leaving the restaurant, stuffed with fine food, and
then stealing a roll of bread. Obloskny points out that those rolls
sure smell tasty when they are fresh out of the oven...) "AK" also
has food scenes involving peasant foodstuffs (including bread) that
are quite compelling.

zi...@aol.com (Hound of Cullen) wrote:

> In article <4nlbm2$c...@omnifest.uwm.edu>,
> har...@omnifest.uwm.edu (Paul Hartman) wrote:
> > I have some characters in my novel-in-progress who like to eat, but
> >I'm finding that none of the descriptions of food flavors that I'm coming up
> >with satisfy me at all. If anyone could recommend a few sources that I could
> >use as models/inspiration, I will be very grateful. The kinds of food in
> >question are such things as fresh baked break, fresh made butter, the flavors
> >of berries in the fresh air after a long walk, things that I thought would be
> >simple but are not, at least thus far.

> First, some suggested reading: M.F.K. Fisher and James Beard (naturally)

dol...@coffey.com

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May 23, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/23/96
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a...@peavine.com (Jensen) wrote:


>>In <319FA1...@pixie.co.za> Roy Blumenthal
>><roy.blu...@pixie.co.za> writes:
>>>

>>>> I'm finding that none of the descriptions of food flavors that I'm
>>coming up
>>>> with satisfy me at all. If anyone could recommend a few sources that
>>I could
>>>> use as models/inspiration, I will be very grateful.
>>>

I also taste the food I'm trying to put in. Believe it or not, I
wrote carrots into the current book and sat here munching them. My
books are science fiction so my main character had never had a true
Terran carrot before. He noticed the color was bad and the flavor was
off, but more pleasant than the mutated Karot root. Seems when
carrots get planted outside on Syra, they tend to go yellow after a
few generations and the flavor changes.

Anyway, carrots are crispy, munchy, and pleasantly bland. The texture
of a carrot is a great part of it's enjoyment.

mike....@software.rockwell.com

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May 23, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/23/96
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dol...@coffey.com wrote:

>I also taste the food I'm trying to put in. Believe it or not, I
>wrote carrots into the current book and sat here munching them.

YES! Absolutely! Go to the real source for inspiration. There is no
substitute that is half as good.

I'm sure you already know carrots pretty well, so your munching wasn't
obviously important (your "Believe it or not" shows that) but I bet
you wrote better as a result.

People all too often try to write from memory or other people's
descriptions. It's just so much more vivid and honest when you get the
information first hand and immediate.

This applies in any art form. Including the very non-artistic tech
writing I do for a living.
--
Roses are red Mike Huber
Violets are blue
if I were a poet, this would rhyme.


thi...@pipeline.com

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May 23, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/23/96
to

In article <4o0pv1$h...@sjx-ixn6.ix.netcom.com>, VEI writes:

>I would have mentioned the scenes with Levin and Oblonsky sharing
>restaurant meals in "Anna Karenina." Lots of examples of characters
>and events being expressed through descriptions of food and eating.
>(Levin expresses shock at the thought of commiting adultery, comparing
>it with the act of leaving the restaurant, stuffed with fine food, and
>then stealing a roll of bread. Obloskny points out that those rolls
>sure smell tasty when they are fresh out of the oven...) "AK" also
>has food scenes involving peasant foodstuffs (including bread) that
>are quite compelling.

Lovely examples, but I think that when it comes to writing about food, it's
awfully difficult to top the French -- Zola and Colette, particularly.

Terry "La Grande Bouffe" Hicks

Jean Lamb

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May 24, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/24/96
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There's also a few wonderful pages in Irving Stone's PASSIONS OF THE
MIND where he describes all the glorious food you could get on the
Ringstrasse in Vienna. I have yet to reread that section without
gaining five pounds just THINKING about that stuff! Death by
sachertorte!
>thi...@pipeline.com wrote:

Jean Lamb
Queen of her own Universe, Unrealty Office opening soon!
See her story "Galley Slave" in the August _Analog_.


Anna Halbert

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May 26, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/26/96
to

On 18 May 1996 15:24:34 -0500, har...@omnifest.uwm.edu (Paul Hartman)
wrote:

> I have some characters in my novel-in-progress who like to eat, but

>I'm finding that none of the descriptions of food flavors that I'm coming up
>with satisfy me at all. If anyone could recommend a few sources that I could

>use as models/inspiration, I will be very grateful. The kinds of food in
>question are such things as fresh baked break, fresh made butter, the flavors
>of berries in the fresh air after a long walk, things that I thought would be
>simple but are not, at least thus far.

>thanks
>paul

possibly useful example:

there is a scene in mary stewart's _nine coaches waiting_ where our
female protagonist and her young charge have walked many miles to
escape a possibly imaginary danger, and are exhausted, and they find
themselves in a small french town. they go into a tiny cafe and she
orders a steak with mushrooms. when it arrives, it's dripping with
butter, and her description of eating that steak implanted an
unfulfillable need in my neo-cortex for *that meal*. i spent years
trying to find it. it doesn't exist outside of that context.

-a

********************************************************************************
This writing business, pencils and whatnot. Over-rated if you ask me.
--Eeyore
********************************************************************************

Lorrill Buyens

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May 27, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/27/96
to

zi...@aol.com (Hound of Cullen), while summoning a demon, chanted :

>In article <4nlbm2$c...@omnifest.uwm.edu>,
> har...@omnifest.uwm.edu (Paul Hartman) wrote:
>> I have some characters in my novel-in-progress who like to eat, but
>>I'm finding that none of the descriptions of food flavors that I'm coming up
>>with satisfy me at all. If anyone could recommend a few sources that I could
>>use as models/inspiration, I will be very grateful. The kinds of food in
>>question are such things as fresh baked break, fresh made butter, the flavors
>>of berries in the fresh air after a long walk, things that I thought would be
>>simple but are not, at least thus far.

>First, some suggested reading: M.F.K. Fisher and James Beard (naturally)


>for the basics. Patrick O'Brien, in his "Aubrey-Maturin" novels,
>describes some wonderful feasts. (I'm drawing a blank on others right
>now...)

Michael Bond's Monsieur Pamplemousse novels are about a detective-turned-
food-critic. They all have some of the most *mouthwatering* descriptions of
French cuisine I've ever read... ;-)

Lorrill (The most "exotic" food I've ever eaten personally is roast duckling)
Buyens


----------------------------------------------------------------
| Doctor Fraud |Always believe six|
|Mad Inventor & Purveyor of Pseudopsychology |impossible things |
| Weird Science At Bargain Rates |before breakfast. |
|----------------------------------------------------------------|
|"Where did Robinson Crusoe go | "On a double |
| with Friday on Saturday night?" - Al Jolson | date?" - Me|
----------------------------------------------------------------


Jaimes Alsop

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May 27, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/27/96
to

Paul Hartman wrote:
>
> I have some characters in my novel-in-progress who like to eat, but
> I'm finding that none of the descriptions of food flavors that I'm coming up
> with satisfy me at all.

You've just discovered the problem that wine writers have been wrestling with for years: It's
impossible to describe taste. I'd pick up a couple of good wine or cooking books or magazines,
The Wine Spectator's a good one, Bon Appetit, things like that.

Good Luck

--
The Alsop Review
http://www.hooked.net/~jalsop/
http://www.geocities com/Athens/1001/

Web del Sol
http://www.cais.net/aesir/fiction/

Margaret Young

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May 28, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/28/96
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Jaimes Alsop (jal...@hooked.net) wrote:
: Paul Hartman wrote:
I like Laurie Colwin's food essays--margaret
: > I have some characters in my novel-in-progress who like to eat, but

Larry Bassel/Barbara Frezza

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May 28, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/28/96
to

In <31AA2C...@hooked.net> Jaimes Alsop <jal...@hooked.net> writes:
>
>Paul Hartman wrote:
>>
>> I have some characters in my novel-in-progress who like to
eat, but
>> I'm finding that none of the descriptions of food flavors that I'm
coming up
>> with satisfy me at all.

Empirical research often helps. If your character particularly likes
French, Italian or Chinese food, for example, you could learn how these
dishes are prepared. Buy small amounts of each of the spices--garlic,
ginger, basil, sesame oil, soybeans, oregano, sage, rosemary, thyme,
various peppers, etc. Get fresh rather than dried if you can. You'll
also need a loaf of very good bread, and some olive oil or some sweet
butter. Dip a small piece of bread in oil, cover with a pinch of the
spice, taste, and write down the description: sweet, hot, bitter,
biting, sour...etc. The flavors are often complex. You taste each of
the spices on different parts of the tongue. Rinse your throat with
clear water between tastes.

BArbara

Dick Harper

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May 30, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/30/96
to

Paul Hartman asked, then Camille wrote:

> I have some characters in my novel-in-progress who like to eat, but
> I'm finding that none of the descriptions of food flavors that I'm coming up
> with satisfy me at all.

[shaken not stirred]


>One of my favorite "food" authors is Brian Jacques, who writes High Heroic
>Fantasies about rodents.

Diane Mott Davidson writes the "chocolate mysteries" featuring a
Colorado caterer who catches the killer _and_ teaches us to cook. I
will not make you drool over her recipes here. Go read the book(s).

Now, on the subject of chocolate, Anne just baked a fresh batch of
brownies to give my elastic-waisted-putter-pants some needed exercise.
There may be no such thing as a bad brownie (no girl scout jokes,
please), but I have stumbled on an improvement.

... short pause while I check that Anne's not looking ...

Anne's mom sent a jar of homemade raspberry jam. Sculpt in showy
peaks, over (or between) the brownie. Now, if we can find that tub of
Ben & Jerry's sinful hot fudge sauce to add ...

--Dick (sorry, I gotta go lick my fingers) Harper


-------------------------------------------------------------
Harper's first law: Junk expands to fill the available space.
rbha...@together.net......http://www.together.net/~rbharper/stuff.htm


SJTowse

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May 30, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/30/96
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Dick Harper wrote:
< a lovely thing to do to chocolate brownies >

Ooooh! Ooooh! Is it chocolate recipe swap time???

---------------------------------------------------
Heart Attack Chocolate Brownies a la Towse Kendall

Mix up a batch of chocolate brownies (your choice of recipes). Before
pouring into baking pan, stir in 6-12oz chocolate chips (as your
chocolate dependency requires) and a cup or two of whole roasted
macadamia nuts. Pour into pan and bake as you would a "normal" batch.
The brownies take a bit longer to bake because of the added ingredients
and are sort of ooozy even when done because of the melted chocolate
chunks.


This does *so* have to do with writing... we needs must keep our
strength up...

Sal

Davida Chazan

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Jun 3, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/3/96
to

Much appreciated. The following post will be lovingly cross posted to
alt.food.chocolate and rec.food.chocolate. Any other comments to this
post which have nothing to do with chocolate should remove these two
groups from the list of ngs. Any other comments to this post which
have nothing to do with misc.writing may remain in all three groups
(just so I can see them all!).

I say, wasn't that SJTowse <sjt...@ix.netcom.com> who wrote:

>:|Sal

*-*-*-*-*-*-*
"Life is like a box of Chocolates..."
from 'Forrest Gump'
*-*-*-*-*-*-*


Dick Harper

unread,
Jun 5, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/5/96
to

The following post is lovingly cross posted from misc.writing because
I don't think Davida saw it there ...

Paul Hartman asked, then Camille wrote:

> I have some characters in my novel-in-progress who like to eat, but
> I'm finding that none of the descriptions of food flavors that I'm coming up
> with satisfy me at all.
[shaken not stirred]
>One of my favorite "food" authors is Brian Jacques, who writes High Heroic
>Fantasies about rodents.

Diane Mott Davidson writes the "chocolate mysteries" featuring a
Colorado caterer who catches the killer _and_ teaches us to cook. I
will not make you drool over her recipes here. Go read the book(s).

Now, on the subject of chocolate (which is the part of this post that
belongs here), Anne just baked a fresh batch of brownies to give my

Jacey Bedford

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Jun 5, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/5/96
to

In article <4p40ha$o...@bristlecone.together.net>, Dick Harper
<rbha...@together.net> writes
[Snip of wonderful squidgy chocolate thingy recipe]

>-------------------------------------------------------------
>Harper's first law: Junk expands to fill the available space.
>rbha...@together.net......http://www.together.net/~rbharper/stuff.htm
>
I'd try that recipe but if I did my sig. would have to be:-
"Waists expand to fill the available space."
In fact that could be my sig already.

Writing is good for the diet, when it's really going well I don't even
want to stop to eat. Just don't ask about when it's going badly....
--
Jacey Bedford e-mail art...@artifact.demon.co.uk

"It's never too late to have a happy childhood."

dol...@coffey.com

unread,
Jun 7, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/7/96
to

LOW FAT CHOCOLATES!!

First you buy a quart container of plain yogurt (preferably without
gelatin). Low-fat works just as well as any other. Dump the yogurt
into a flour sack towel and hang it over a sink of bucket for two days
to let the whey run out. When you get done, you have yogurt cheese.

Take the yogurt cheese and mix it to taste with cocoa and sugar or a
sugar substitute. Form it into balls and store in your refrigerator.
Will keep about two weeks.

Chocolate and healthy, too!

FROM THE STARVING WRITER'S COOKBOOK.

Message has been deleted

AHeilmann

unread,
Jun 17, 1996, 3:00:00 AM6/17/96
to

In article <BB4QdRAW...@artifact.demon.co.uk>, Jacey Bedford
<Art...@artifact.demon.co.uk> writes:

>
>In article <4p40ha$o...@bristlecone.together.net>, Dick Harper
><rbha...@together.net> writes
>[Snip of wonderful squidgy chocolate thingy recipe]
>>-------------------------------------------------------------
>>Harper's first law: Junk expands to fill the available space.
>>rbha...@together.net......http://www.together.net/~rbharper/stuff.htm
>>
>I'd try that recipe but if I did my sig. would have to be:-
>"Waists expand to fill the available space."
>In fact that could be my sig already.
>
>

No, no, no, not fill the available space...exceed the available space.


{http//downtown.web.aol.com/ads/b/BlatantImagessinc/ad46/page_1.html}

Aimster aka AHei...@aol.com The views expressed are not those of my
online rep. Blatant Images Inc. employer...these are not Outragous
enough!

Reality is for people who can't handle fantasy

Jerry

unread,
Aug 2, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/2/96
to

dav...@jdc.org.il (Davida Chazan) wrote:

>>>:|Heart Attack Chocolate Brownies a la Towse Kendall

>>>:|Mix up a batch of chocolate brownies (your choice of recipes). Before
>>>:|pouring into baking pan, stir in 6-12oz chocolate chips (as your
>>>:|chocolate dependency requires) and a cup or two of whole roasted
>>>:|macadamia nuts.

<snip>

If there is room for nuts, there is room to substitute more chocolate.


<continue> <G>

>>>Pour into pan and bake as you would a "normal" batch.

My personal preference is to sprinkle 1/2 bag (6 oz) of chocolate
chips on the top of the brownie mixture after it is in the baking pan
(rather than mix it in). That way, the melted chocolate will "sink in"
and not all be at the bottom. Also, I try to keep the chips away from
the sides/edges (for obvious reasons).

>>>:|The brownies take a bit longer to bake because of the added ingredients
>>>:|and are sort of ooozy even when done because of the melted chocolate
>>>:|chunks.


>>>:|This does *so* have to do with writing... we needs must keep our
>>>:|strength up...

>>>:|Sal

Why do I only use half a bag of chocolate chips? Well, I *DO* need to
use up the rest of the bag <G>--so I make another batch fairly soon!

Regards, Jerry


The Chocolate Lady (Davida Chazan)

unread,
Aug 4, 1996, 3:00:00 AM8/4/96
to

Contrary to popular opinion, it was not I who cross posted this
particular article to misc.writing! The last time I posted to this
thread, I snipped misc.writing. This time, I'm snipping my two
chocolate groups.

Now, if we wish to get into a new chocolate thread which is
exclusively MWV, I'd be happy to help you'all out.

>dav...@jdc.org.il (Davida Chazan) wrote:


><continue> <G>

>>>>:|Sal

>Regards, Jerry


****
De chocolate non est disputandum!
****


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