The term: whistle-britches. Where'd it come from?

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John Romadka

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Sep 11, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/11/95
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I'm a copy writer for a clothing catalog and someone I know used the term
"whistle-britches". I have exhausted all other known means of identifying
the origin. Does anyone have a clue?

Wayne C. Wood

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Sep 12, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/12/95
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In article <jaromad-1109951541210001@msn_2_15.binc.net>,

someone who's so fat that when they walk the thighs of their pants rub
together making that "wheet wheet" sound... especially if they are corduroy...

-- woody (at MIT the static electricity thus generated was measured in
Mega-Stacies... in honor of some poor girl at a local MacDonalds)

D.R.I.P. == Don't Reelect Incumbent Politicians

Cathy Krusberg

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Sep 12, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/12/95
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In article <4345gi$aq0...@granite-d228.sierra.net>

kai...@sierra.net (Wayne C. Wood) writes:

>
>In article <jaromad-1109951541210001@msn_2_15.binc.net>,
> jar...@mailbag.com (John Romadka) wrote:
>>I'm a copy writer for a clothing catalog and someone I know used the term
>>"whistle-britches". I have exhausted all other known means of identifying
>>the origin. Does anyone have a clue?
>
>someone who's so fat that when they walk the thighs of their pants rub
>together making that "wheet wheet" sound... especially if they are corduroy...

This is the first time I've seen any connection
between the term "whistle britches/breeches" and the shape
of the wearer. I've always seen the term used to refer
to corduroy pants, period, because of the sound they
make when anyone, fat or thin, walks in them.

Cathy Krusberg
Internet: ckb...@uga.cc.uga.edu

Terry Sellers

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Sep 13, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/13/95
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I think the term "whistle-britches" came from the fact the courderroy (sp?)
pants - when you walk they make a noise that sounds like a whistle.


Terry Sellers
t.m....@larc.nasa.gov

William S. Lovell

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Sep 14, 1995, 3:00:00 AM9/14/95
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: te...@shab50.larc.nasa.gov (Terry Sellers) writes:
:
: I think the term "whistle-britches" came from the fact the courderroy (sp?)

: pants - when you walk they make a noise that sounds like a whistle.

Or more specifically, knickers.


Bill (blue jeans) Lovell

bstee...@gmail.com

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Jul 4, 2015, 8:01:18 PM7/4/15
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It's corduroy pants, and I've only heard it applied to thin men. It's a derogatory term, but I guess that goes without saying.

blh...@gmail.com

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Nov 30, 2017, 5:09:38 PM11/30/17
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Wrong...it's a southern term of endearment meaning someone who is very physically attractive, especially in jeans, slacks, etc that because of such could garner whistles from men because of her figure.

mark_w...@hotmail.com

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Jun 10, 2018, 2:18:50 PM6/10/18
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Whistle-Britches is a saying from the old South during the depression. Due to the lack of beef and chicken protein people ate red beans regularly. Beano and other such products were not available. Fatulence was common due to the diets of the days. Whistle-Britches referred to a person suffering from fatulence aka GAS!

nine...@gmail.com

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Jun 5, 2020, 11:49:56 AM6/5/20
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On Sunday, June 10, 2018 at 2:18:50 PM UTC-4, mark_w...@hotmail.com wrote:
> Whistle-Britches is a saying from the old South during the depression. Due to the lack of beef and chicken protein people ate red beans regularly. Beano and other such products were not available. Fatulence was common due to the diets of the days. Whistle-Britches referred to a person suffering from fatulence aka GAS!

My father called me "whistle britches" affectionately. He grew up during the depression (but on the North Shore of Massachusetts. I thought it referred to one whose pants had so many holes the wind whistled through them. I was neither thin nor heavy and flatulence was never discussed.
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