Has anyone sent their work to Rosedog.com?

3 views
Skip to first unread message

Nicky Leech

unread,
Nov 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/21/99
to
Has anyone sold their work using Rosedog?

Nicky Leech

unread,
Nov 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/21/99
to

Nicky Leech <Nicky...@btinternet.com> wrote in message
news:819tfe$96g$1...@neptunium.btinternet.com...

> Has anyone sold their work using Rosedog?
>
>
>
>
Where else can I post my writing on the Internet?

Nicky
< http://venusflytrap.co.uk >

Terje Johansen

unread,
Nov 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/22/99
to
Nicky Leech wrote in message <819um0$42k$1...@uranium.btinternet.com>...

That depends on what kind of writing you do, and whether you expect to be
paid or not. The number of e-publishers is now infinite.


-Terje Johansen

---
Freedom lies in being bold. - Robert Frost

Jerry Kindall

unread,
Nov 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/22/99
to
In article <81b967$62t$1...@oslo-nntp.eunet.no>, "Terje Johansen"
<terje.j...@tandbergtv.no> wrote:

> Nicky Leech wrote in message <819um0$42k$1...@uranium.btinternet.com>...
> >
> >Nicky Leech <Nicky...@btinternet.com> wrote in message
> >news:819tfe$96g$1...@neptunium.btinternet.com...
> >> Has anyone sold their work using Rosedog?
> >>
> >Where else can I post my writing on the Internet?
>

> That depends on what kind of writing you do, and whether you expect
> to be paid or not. The number of e-publishers is now infinite.

Actually, it is finite, but uncountable because it is growing faster
than you can count.

--
Jerry Kindall <mailto:kin...@mail.manual.com> Technical Writing, etc.
Manual Labor <http://www.manual.com/> We Wrote the Book!

Jerry's Finder 9 Patch is here! http://www.manual.com/freebies.html

red_...@my-deja.com

unread,
Nov 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/22/99
to
In article <819tfe$96g$1...@neptunium.btinternet.com>,

"Nicky Leech" <Nicky...@btinternet.com> wrote:
> Has anyone sold their work using Rosedog?
>
>
Rosedog is what we call YADS (Yet Another Display Site). While it's
possible that someone has sold work via a display site, it isn't the
first or even the second way that I'd choose to bring my work to the
attention of an editor.

The only book that I'm aware of that was posted on a display site that
sold to a print publisher was also submitted in paper to that
publisher, and it was the paper submission which was accepted.

In fact, aside from the unlikeliness of an editor having enough free
time to cruise the web looking for yet more slush to add to the pile of
slush already on his or her desk, here's something that the display
sites won't tell you: Editors _can't_ buy books from them, since the
work wasn't submitted to the publishing house.

Note: there's an exception to this. Suppose that an editor found a
manuscript in a brown paper bag on a subway platform, accidentally
glanced at the first page, loved it, and wanted to buy the book. That
editor could find the author and ask the author to submit the work.

In practical terms, putting your work on a display site is about like
putting your manuscript in a box and leaving it on a subway platform in
hope that an editor will come by. (In fact, most of the publishing
houses in New York are physically close together -- you can pick the
right subway stop to get an even better chance. There are certain
Chineses restaurants in the publishing district which would be better
still.)

But let's get tricky about this. How about sneaking your manuscript
into the lobby of the publisher's office building? The editors will
walk right by it and see the box.

Wait! There's a really sneaky way you can make sure an editor sees
your work. Print it out, double spaced, one side of the paper, with
one-inch margins all around, and your name and address on the first
page. Put it in a box and _mail it to the publisher_! A uniformed
Federal worker will deliver your book or story _directly to the
editor's desk_! The editor will at least look at your first page
before he or she even thinks about looking on the Internet.

Don't forget to include the SASE.

Best,
Jim Macdonald


Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

David M. Harris

unread,
Nov 22, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/22/99
to

red_...@my-deja.com wrote:

> [major trim]


> But let's get tricky about this. How about sneaking your manuscript
> into the lobby of the publisher's office building? The editors will
> walk right by it and see the box.
>
> Wait! There's a really sneaky way you can make sure an editor sees
> your work. Print it out, double spaced, one side of the paper, with
> one-inch margins all around, and your name and address on the first
> page. Put it in a box and _mail it to the publisher_! A uniformed
> Federal worker will deliver your book or story _directly to the
> editor's desk_! The editor will at least look at your first page
> before he or she even thinks about looking on the Internet.
>
> Don't forget to include the SASE.
>

But that has two major disadvantages. First, you're buying into the
traditional paternalist Luddite mindset of the publishing business.
Second, it takes a small effort. (No, three major disadvantages -- you may
get rejected. The display sites don't run this risk.)

dmh

Nancy

unread,
Nov 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/23/99
to
In article <3839FDE5...@earthlink.net>,

colds...@earthlink.net wrote:
> But that has two major disadvantages. First, you're buying into the
> traditional paternalist Luddite mindset of the publishing business.
> Second, it takes a small effort. (No, three major disadvantages --
you may
> get rejected. The display sites don't run this risk.)
>
> dmh

Now, now, David, play nice with Uncle Red Mike. :-) (Golly, I'm glad I
know you're being sarastic here, David. Shudder.)

No risk, no gain.

But you have a point about the disadvantage of effort. This may detour
(pun intended) a lot more slush that instead ends up where it will
never be seen by a "traditional" editor. Amen! Hallelujah! Praise be to
the Slush Gods!

selah,
--Nancy

red_...@my-deja.com

unread,
Nov 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/23/99
to
David's quite right. Works posted at YADS are never rejected.

A display site that posts works for free is merely misguided. One that
charges the authors money is actively dishonest.

Bottom-feeding scam agents and vanity presses may indeed make use of
display sites to find potential marks.

Best,
Jim Macdonald

In article <81db5e$9cq$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>,

Victoria Strauss

unread,
Nov 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/23/99
to
red_...@my-deja.com wrote:

> Bottom-feeding scam agents and vanity presses may indeed make use of
> display sites to find potential marks.

Also marginal agents with no track records and little knowledge of the
publishing business. There are quite a number of these actively
recruiting clients from display sites.

-Victoria
--------------------------------------------------------
Victoria Strauss
THE GARDEN OF THE STONE (Avon Eos 1999)
Homepage: http://www.sff.net/people/victoriastrauss
Writer Beware: http://www.sfwa.org/Beware/Warnings.html

patricia

unread,
Nov 23, 1999, 3:00:00 AM11/23/99
to
David Harris mentioned:

>the traditional paternalist Luddite
>mindset of the publishing business.

This is sooooo true.

Last week I finally got the okay to e-mail my manuscripts to a particular
publisher instead of using snail mail. Since they reimburse for mailings, I'm
amazed it took them this long to make the switch to electronic submissions for
authors already under contract.

And my agent *still* doesn't have e-mail. Sheesh!

-- patricia

Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages