My trip to Chautauqua, NY

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Marc Fannin

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Jul 18, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/18/99
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On June 30, the members of the Civic Band and Civic Chorus based at
Lakeland Community College (I-90 Exit 193, Ohio) travelled to
Chautauqua, New York, to perform a joint concert. I rode with somebody
who picked me up on the way. The route we took was the fastest route
there and back since this was a working trip (albeit voluntary work), I-
90 at Exit 200 (OH 44) east to PA/NY 17, then north on Co. Rd. 33 to a
very short section of NY 394. (It was dark on the way back, anyway.)

Comments:

- The freeways were in good condition the whole route, even in
Pennsylvania (silencing the skeptics momentarily ;) ). In fact, the
only construction on the whole trip was in Ohio, and that was only for
literally about 2 dozen yards: the shoulders on I-90 were closed under
the OH 528 overpass within Exit 212 (presumably in conection with the
Village of Madison utility extension that I read about some time
back). The guy who was driving informed me that the last time the band
and chorus went to perform at the Chautauqua Institution (1997) that
the eastern extreme of I-90 on our route (leading to PA 17) was under
construction, but it was long gone when we went through this time.

- Speaking of the the driver's comparisons to the 1997 trip, he told me
that PA 17 and NY 17 were still only a Super-2 then, with much visible
progress on the other roadway. Now, the route was entirely-completed
freeway, but there were interesting signs of the eastbound roadway
having recently been a two-way highway: signs of the former
double-yellow line were apparent (as was an arrow in the left lane of
PA 17 pointing towards us as we approached it!), and on the way back I
saw signs on the overpasses on PA 17 in our direction over the opposing
lanes, fairly far away from our lanes due to the wide median.

- The median was even wider on NY 17. While it wasn't exceptionally
wide (it was no Monteagle Mountain), for some reason I felt totally
isolated from the other direction even though it was usually plainly
visible.

- Saw my first (and only) "Future I-86" sign! It was right in front of
the NY 426 exit sign (which BTW was all text).

- Now I know why everyone makes a big deal about this section of NY 17
being the Southern Tier Expressway. I saw not a single NY 17 marker
anywhere that wasn't accompanied by an STE marker, whether on or off
the freeway.

- Co. Rd. 33 was not mentioned on 17 or its ramps, but pentagons on the
road itself were fairly common. (No surprise there.)

- The most fascinating part of the trip was the Village of Chautauqua
itself. I did quite a bit of roadgeeking there -- but it was all on
foot! You see, the community is closed to all but a few special
vehicles. Everybody else parks in a huge parking area, then enters the
village like they would an amusement park. (On the way in from the
parking lot, we took the long way around, but that was good, because I
ended up walking right past a reference marker on NY 394, at
waist-level, no less. And yes, it identified 394 as "17J". And yes, I
got a picture.) After we entered the gate, I felt like I was in a
theme park or at fairgrounds (it reminded me of Center Island off
Toronto). But Chautauqua is a real community with actual residents!
The vehicles allowed in are those of the residents, and even then,
there is little room to drive and even less room to park. It was
interesting. I walked around on the many streets for about two hours.
Then the groups rehearsed, ate dinner which was supplied by the school,
located within the community, and then performed (it went well and was
enjoyed by a sizable audience). My ride left right afterwards. We
stopped at the OH 84/193 exit on the way back around midnight, the only
stop en route.


--
Marc Fannin
musx...@kent.edu
http://www.personal.kent.edu/~musxf579/home.html


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Nathan Perry

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Jul 18, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/18/99
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In article <7mtc92$9bn$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, musx...@kent.edu (Marc Fannin) wrote:

> - The most fascinating part of the trip was the Village of Chautauqua
> itself. I did quite a bit of roadgeeking there -- but it was all on
> foot! You see, the community is closed to all but a few special
> vehicles. Everybody else parks in a huge parking area, then enters the
> village like they would an amusement park. (On the way in from the
> parking lot, we took the long way around, but that was good, because I
> ended up walking right past a reference marker on NY 394, at
> waist-level, no less. And yes, it identified 394 as "17J". And yes, I
> got a picture.) After we entered the gate, I felt like I was in a
> theme park or at fairgrounds (it reminded me of Center Island off
> Toronto). But Chautauqua is a real community with actual residents!
> The vehicles allowed in are those of the residents, and even then,
> there is little room to drive and even less room to park. It was
> interesting. I walked around on the many streets for about two hours.
> Then the groups rehearsed, ate dinner which was supplied by the school,
> located within the community, and then performed (it went well and was
> enjoyed by a sizable audience). My ride left right afterwards. We
> stopped at the OH 84/193 exit on the way back around midnight, the only
> stop en route.

Strictly speaking, Chautauqua is not a village in the NYS sense. It may
once have been; I've seen maps that show it thus, corrected in later
editions. USGS has an Institution-type boundary around it, which some
mapmakers may have confused for a village line.

It is fascinating; I remember it vaguely. I could have sworn we drove
through at least part of it.

--
_____________________________________________________________________
N.W.Perry __/ { "Just because you know what you're talking
Rochester, N.Y. ¿___ | about, that doesn't mean you know what
Boston, Mass. \|_= you're doing."

Marc Fannin

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Jul 20, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/20/99
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In article..., nwp...@student.berklee.edu (Nathan Perry) wrote:

> In article..., musx...@kent.edu (Marc Fannin) wrote:
>
> > - The most fascinating part of the trip was the Village of

> > Chautauqua itself. [....]


>
> Strictly speaking, Chautauqua is not a village in the NYS sense. It
> may once have been; I've seen maps that show it thus, corrected in
> later editions. USGS has an Institution-type boundary around it,
> which some mapmakers may have confused for a village line.

Noticed that on the quad as well, but forgot about it. Shoulda written
"village of Chautauqua" instead of "Village of Chautauqua". :)

> N.W.Perry

Michael Moroney

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Jul 20, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/20/99
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In article <nwperry-1807...@news.ma.ultranet.com>,
nwp...@student.berklee.edu (Nathan Perry) wrote:

> In article <7mtc92$9bn$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, musx...@kent.edu (Marc Fannin) wrote:
>
> > - The most fascinating part of the trip was the Village of Chautauqua
> > itself. I did quite a bit of roadgeeking there -- but it was all on
> > foot! You see, the community is closed to all but a few special
> > vehicles. Everybody else parks in a huge parking area, then enters the
> > village like they would an amusement park.

> It is fascinating; I remember it vaguely. I could have sworn we drove


> through at least part of it.

So is Chautauqua a giant gated community, a resort center or what?

-Mike

David Jensen

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Jul 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/21/99
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On Tue, 20 Jul 1999 12:07:38 GMT, in misc.transport.road
mor...@world.std.spaamtrap.com (Michael Moroney) wrote in
<KaGl3kOJ...@world.std.spaamtrap.com>:

Yes and yes, but no. It is an educational institution that has a few
people living on the premises. It still holds numerous educational
retreats. It pioneered what we would call "continuing education" today.
I have a few of the books from 1892-93 --the CLSC required literature
for 1892-93 was:

Grecian History -- $1,00;
Callias, An Historical Romance -- 1.00;
The United States and Foreign Powers -- 1.00
Greek Architecture and Sculpture -- .50;
Classic Greek Course in English -- 1.00;
A Manual of Christian Evidence -- .50; and
The Chautauquan (12 numbers) -- 2.00.

One of the books has a lovely seal with the words: "The many, not the
few".

Marc Fannin

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Jul 21, 1999, 3:00:00 AM7/21/99
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In article..., dje...@madison.tds.net wrote:

> ...mor...@world.std.spaamtrap.com (Michael Moroney) wrote...:
>
> >In article..., nwp...@student.berklee.edu (Nathan Perry) wrote:


> >
> >> In article..., musx...@kent.edu (I) wrote:
> >>
> >> > - The most fascinating part of the trip was the Village of
> >> > Chautauqua itself. I did quite a bit of roadgeeking there --
> >> > but it was all on foot! You see, the community is closed to all
> >> > but a few special vehicles. Everybody else parks in a huge
> >> > parking area, then enters the village like they would an
> >> > amusement park.
> >>
> >> It is fascinating; I remember it vaguely. I could have sworn we
> >> drove through at least part of it.
> >
> >So is Chautauqua a giant gated community, a resort center or what?
>

> Yes and yes, but no. It is an educational institution that has a few

> people living on the premises. [....]

Quite a few. For more info, see http://www.chautauqua-inst.org/ ,
especially the "History" section. From what I could tell, residents
don't actually have to attend the Institution to live there.

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