"Trunk" "Highway" or "Route"

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rghYQM

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Oct 17, 2004, 8:21:32 AM10/17/04
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What the common term in your area? In Nova Scotia the original
highways routes are usually referred to as "Trunk" 1 or "Trunk" 2. The
parallel freeway: "Highway" 102 or just "The One Oh Two". Highway 104
is usually "The Trans Canada" And the secondary roads: "Route" 245
"Route" 337 etc.

Would anyone call the "102" the "One Zero Two"?

And is Ontario's famous "Four Oh One" ever referred to as the "Four
Zero One"

Comrade Mr Yamamoto

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Oct 17, 2004, 7:27:19 PM10/17/04
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rghYQM wrote:

A "Trunk Highway" is an elephant's favorite road.

--
Comrade Mister Yamamoto
http://mryamamoto.50megs.com
"Being an anarchist is easy when your possessions suck."

Chris Bessert

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Oct 17, 2004, 7:26:28 PM10/17/04
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rghYQM wrote:

> What the common term in your area? In Nova Scotia the original
> highways routes are usually referred to as "Trunk" 1 or "Trunk" 2. The
> parallel freeway: "Highway" 102 or just "The One Oh Two". Highway 104
> is usually "The Trans Canada" And the secondary roads: "Route" 245
> "Route" 337 etc.

This depends on the area you're in and can vary WIDELY.

In the Great Lakes region, you have the following:

Ontario: Provincial ("King's") Highways, Secondary Highways and
Tertiary Highways are all referred to in the same manner, e.g.
"Highway 10," "Highway 562" and "Highway 801."
Wisconsin: ALL numbered (state) and lettered (county) routes are
referred to as "Highway xx" as well. I-94 is "Highway 94," US-10
is "Highway 10," STH-57 is "Highway 57" and CTH-B is "Highway B."
Illinois, Indiana, Ohio: Generally, it's "Route xx" for all numbered
highways except Interstates. US-52 is "Route 52"
Michigan: One of the odd-balls in North America, as Michiganders
actually know and embrace the differences between the numbered
routes in their state. No such thing as "Highway xx" or "Route
xx" in Michigan! I-96 is "I-96," US-23 is "US-23" and M-46 is
"M-46."

> Would anyone call the "102" the "One Zero Two"?

Not that I'm aware of. In my experience, routes numbered from "1"
through "100" are stated precisely as they are written. Those triple-
digit routes from "x01" through "x09" (e.g. "101" and "605") are all
stated "Highway One-Oh-One" and "Highway Six-Oh-Five." Those triple-
digit routes from "x10" through "x99" (e.g. "112" and "645") are all
stated "Highway One-Twelve" and "Highway Six-Forty Five."

> And is Ontario's famous "Four Oh One" ever referred to as the "Four
> Zero One"

Never. Actually, I've never heard "x-Zero-x" stated anywhere in North
America, outside the remote possibility of Emergency Dispatch, where
the law enforcement or EMTs need to be as clear as possible when trying
to send response vehicles out to accident locations. But as people
speak, no, "Four Zero One" isn't said.

Later,
Chris

--
Chris Bessert
Bess...@aol.com
http://www.michiganhighways.org
http://www.wisconsinhighways.org
http://www.ontariohighways.org

Keith

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Oct 17, 2004, 9:30:46 PM10/17/04
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nbVI...@hotmail.com (rghYQM) wrote in message news:<f47fb570.04101...@posting.google.com>...

We call it by the prefix, either I-, US- or M-. Many states will just
say route xxx for any of the above. Of course, you might not be
interested in any of since, because these are communist roads like in
your country.

Comrade Mr Yamamoto

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Oct 17, 2004, 10:18:48 PM10/17/04
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Oi queef: "M" is a prefix used in Rooski and other Commie Countries for
"M"agistral highway. You pro-choice poster child, you.

Mukade

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Oct 17, 2004, 10:42:23 PM10/17/04
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"Chris Bessert" <bess...@aol.com> wrote in message
news:ckuvb3$2fs9$1...@msunews.cl.msu.edu...

> rghYQM wrote:
>
>> What the common term in your area? In Nova Scotia the original
>> highways routes are usually referred to as "Trunk" 1 or "Trunk" 2. The
>> parallel freeway: "Highway" 102 or just "The One Oh Two". Highway 104
>> is usually "The Trans Canada" And the secondary roads: "Route" 245
>> "Route" 337 etc.
>
> This depends on the area you're in and can vary WIDELY.
>
> In the Great Lakes region, you have the following:
>
> Ontario: Provincial ("King's") Highways, Secondary Highways and
> Tertiary Highways are all referred to in the same manner, e.g.
> "Highway 10," "Highway 562" and "Highway 801."
> Wisconsin: ALL numbered (state) and lettered (county) routes are
> referred to as "Highway xx" as well. I-94 is "Highway 94," US-10
> is "Highway 10," STH-57 is "Highway 57" and CTH-B is "Highway B."
> Illinois, Indiana, Ohio: Generally, it's "Route xx" for all numbered
> highways except Interstates. US-52 is "Route 52"

I would disagree for Indiana (and Ohio, I think). InDOT, the media, and
locals all refer to them as "state roads" abbreviated "SR". Therefore, you
even see highway signs referring to "SR 67", for example. Never would
anything official say "route"; it is always "state road" or "SR". The only
exception I saw to this was NW Indiana where locals may say "route" or
"Indiana" more often as the media is dominated by Chicago where the do say
route. US highways are "US xx" and Interstate highways are "I-xx" in
Indiana - i.e. correct.

Away from the midwest, whenever I hear things like car chases in Southern
California on the news, the call everything "the". For example, "the 5
freeway", "the 10 freeway", "the 91 freeway", etc. Is that California-wide?

Mukade

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Oct 17, 2004, 10:53:17 PM10/17/04
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"Chris Bessert" <bess...@aol.com> wrote in message
news:ckuvb3$2fs9$1...@msunews.cl.msu.edu...
> rghYQM wrote:
>
>> What the common term in your area? In Nova Scotia the original
>> highways routes are usually referred to as "Trunk" 1 or "Trunk" 2. The
>> parallel freeway: "Highway" 102 or just "The One Oh Two". Highway 104
>> is usually "The Trans Canada" And the secondary roads: "Route" 245
>> "Route" 337 etc.
>
> This depends on the area you're in and can vary WIDELY.
>
> In the Great Lakes region, you have the following:
>
> Ontario: Provincial ("King's") Highways, Secondary Highways and
> Tertiary Highways are all referred to in the same manner, e.g.
> "Highway 10," "Highway 562" and "Highway 801."
> Wisconsin: ALL numbered (state) and lettered (county) routes are
> referred to as "Highway xx" as well. I-94 is "Highway 94," US-10
> is "Highway 10," STH-57 is "Highway 57" and CTH-B is "Highway B."
> Illinois, Indiana, Ohio: Generally, it's "Route xx" for all numbered
> highways except Interstates. US-52 is "Route 52"
> Michigan: One of the odd-balls in North America, as Michiganders
> actually know and embrace the differences between the numbered
> routes in their state. No such thing as "Highway xx" or "Route
> xx" in Michigan! I-96 is "I-96," US-23 is "US-23" and M-46 is
> "M-46."

Also, if I remember correctly, Kansas has the same idea as Michigan: for
example, K-16.

Mark Roberts

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Oct 17, 2004, 11:11:35 PM10/17/04
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Mukade <charles....@gmail.com> had written:

| Also, if I remember correctly, Kansas has the same idea as Michigan: for
| example, K-16.

Yes, and not only that, but for a few years in the 1970s, the Kansas
City Star also tried to use a similar designation for Missouri state
highways in the Kansas City area (e.g. "M-291"). No one picked
*that* up.

Richie may want to chime in here, but I seem to recall that the
economic development council (or group) in Desoto is named "K-Ten, Inc."
It looks a little *too* much like "K-Tel" to me, but Desoto *is* on K-10....

--
Mark Roberts|"Entire media networks, such as Fox News and Sinclair Broadcasting,
Oakland, Cal| prop up Bush in a way that would make their fellow propagandists
NO HTML MAIL| in North Korea and Cuba proud."
-- Markos Moulitsas, Guardian Unlimited, 2004-10-12



Chris Bessert

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Oct 18, 2004, 1:54:15 AM10/18/04
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Comrade Mr Yamamoto wrote:

> [...] You pro-choice poster child, you.

Oh, now THAT was good. Mean-spirited, yes, but I nearly fell out of
my chair laughing my ass off. You've summed up TrollBoy to a tee.

MC Pee Pants

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Oct 18, 2004, 4:14:39 AM10/18/04
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TV's Mark Roberts wrote:
> Mukade <charles....@gmail.com> had written:
>
>> Also, if I remember correctly, Kansas has the same idea as Michigan:
>> for example, K-16.
>
> Yes, and not only that, but for a few years in the 1970s, the Kansas
> City Star also tried to use a similar designation for Missouri state
> highways in the Kansas City area (e.g. "M-291"). No one picked
> *that* up.

http://www.geocities.com/watuzi/m-1.jpeg

--

Keith

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Oct 18, 2004, 7:13:31 AM10/18/04
to
Chris Bessert <bess...@aol.com> wrote in message news:<ckvm26$i0$1...@msunews.cl.msu.edu>...

> Comrade Mr Yamamoto wrote:
>
> > [...] You pro-choice poster child, you.
>
> Oh, now THAT was good. Mean-spirited, yes, but I nearly fell out of
> my chair laughing my ass off. You've summed up TrollBoy to a tee.
>
> Later,
> Chris


You are obsessed with me.

o n e @none.com o u t e n d

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Oct 18, 2004, 10:48:43 AM10/18/04
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"Keith" <sirke...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:ca5da64.04101...@posting.google.com...

>
> You are obsessed with me.

You are obsessed with you.

No one else could be that stupid even if they tried.


Christopher Steig

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Oct 18, 2004, 4:52:13 PM10/18/04
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"o u t e n d" <n o n e @ n o n e . c o m> wrote in message news:<w-idnZr3rfZ...@comcast.com>...

And I've seen people try.

Marc Fannin

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Oct 18, 2004, 5:41:55 PM10/18/04
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Mukade wrote:

> "Chris Bessert" <bess...@aol.com> wrote...


>
> > rghYQM wrote:
> >
> >> What the common term in your area? In Nova Scotia the original
> >> highways routes are usually referred to as "Trunk" 1 or "Trunk" 2.
The
> >> parallel freeway: "Highway" 102 or just "The One Oh Two". Highway
104
> >> is usually "The Trans Canada" And the secondary roads: "Route" 245
> >> "Route" 337 etc.
> >
> > This depends on the area you're in and can vary WIDELY.
> >
> > In the Great Lakes region, you have the following:
> >
> > Ontario: Provincial ("King's") Highways, Secondary Highways and
> > Tertiary Highways are all referred to in the same manner, e.g.
> > "Highway 10," "Highway 562" and "Highway 801."
> > Wisconsin: ALL numbered (state) and lettered (county) routes are
> > referred to as "Highway xx" as well. I-94 is "Highway 94," US-10
> > is "Highway 10," STH-57 is "Highway 57" and CTH-B is "Highway
B."
> > Illinois, Indiana, Ohio: Generally, it's "Route xx" for all
numbered
> > highways except Interstates. US-52 is "Route 52"
>
> I would disagree for Indiana (and Ohio, I think).

Not Ohio, at least not in the north half or so. The "R" stands for
"route" even in official nomenclature.

> InDOT, the media, and
> locals all refer to them as "state roads" abbreviated "SR".
Therefore, you
> even see highway signs referring to "SR 67", for example. Never would

> anything official say "route"; it is always "state road" or "SR". The
only
> exception I saw to this was NW Indiana where locals may say "route"
or
> "Indiana" more often as the media is dominated by Chicago where the
do say
> route. US highways are "US xx" and Interstate highways are "I-xx" in
> Indiana - i.e. correct.

I have also heard that "Highway xx" is common downstate.

> Away from the midwest, whenever I hear things like car chases in
Southern
> California on the news, the call everything "the". For example, "the
5
> freeway", "the 10 freeway", "the 91 freeway", etc. Is that
California-wide?

No, and in fact, apparently people in Northern California distance
themselves from this practice, as noted in the three newspaper articles
listed at
http://groups.google.com/groups?th=12b17ff17d9c2adb . However, at
least regarding the U.S., this *is* common in the Buffalo/Niagara Falls
area (likely because of ties to nearby Ontario). Canada and Great
Britain (and other anglo countries IIRC) do this as well.

Here are some old threads discussing this topic (and WELL-discussed it
has been):

http://groups.google.com/groups?th=1cea9c356ecf5c60
http://groups.google.com/groups?th=4262e7f3ec65452c

________________________________________________________________________
Marc Fannin|musx...@kent.edu or @hotmail.com| http://www.roadfan.com/

Marc Fannin

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Oct 18, 2004, 5:55:41 PM10/18/04
to
Mukade wrote:

> Also, if I remember correctly, Kansas has the same idea as Michigan:
for
> example, K-16.

Right. The three single-initial states (excepting the Missouri
examples mentioned elsewhere in this thread) are Kansas, Michigan, and
Utah.

josef

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Oct 18, 2004, 6:08:45 PM10/18/04
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"rghYQM" <nbVI...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:f47fb570.04101...@posting.google.com...
: What the common term in your area? In Nova Scotia the original

In NJ (and seems like in PA too) they just say "route" ["root" not "rowt"]
whatever. in NJ, there is no double numbering, i.e., there is an I295 but
there would never be a NJ295. there is no NJ1, NJ95, NJ287, etc. so you
never have to worry about confusing people.

joe

Keith

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Oct 18, 2004, 6:54:42 PM10/18/04
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"o u t e n d" <n o n e @ n o n e . c o m> wrote in message news:<w-idnZr3rfZ...@comcast.com>...


That made no sense. Once again, I am famous here!

James C. Schul

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Oct 19, 2004, 2:00:19 AM10/19/04
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> Right. The three single-initial states (excepting the Missouri
> examples mentioned elsewhere in this thread) are Kansas, Michigan, and
> Utah.

I believe Colorado, Nebraska, and Oklahoma engage in this practice, too.

James C. Schul

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Oct 19, 2004, 2:06:09 AM10/19/04
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"Marc Fannin" <musx...@kent.edu> wrote in message
> > > Illinois, Indiana, Ohio: Generally, it's "Route xx" for all
> numbered
> > > highways except Interstates. US-52 is "Route 52"
> >
> > I would disagree for Indiana (and Ohio, I think).
>
> Not Ohio, at least not in the north half or so. The "R" stands for
> "route" even in official nomenclature.

In Southern Ohio, it's the number for interstates ("75", "275", etc.).
OH 4 was called "Route 4" in a commercial for a Fairfield business
way back when(where the road is Dixie Highway, as well as how mail is
addressed), and I remember the jingle being "Landmark Ford, Route 4 in
Fairfield!"

Marc Fannin

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Oct 19, 2004, 3:11:41 PM10/19/04
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James C. Schul wrote:

> [Marc Fannin wrote:]

Not in general. The only "C" route in Colorado is C-470, and the
Nebraska practice is limited to official documents. Never heard about
Oklahoma. (Anybody?)

MC Pee Pants

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Oct 19, 2004, 3:27:54 PM10/19/04
to
TV's Marc Fannin wrote:
> James C. Schul wrote:
>
>> [Marc Fannin wrote:]
>>
>>> Right. The three single-initial states (excepting the Missouri
>>> examples mentioned elsewhere in this thread) are Kansas, Michigan,
>>> and Utah.
>>
>> I believe Colorado, Nebraska, and Oklahoma engage in this practice,
>> too.
>
> Not in general. The only "C" route in Colorado is C-470, and the
> Nebraska practice is limited to official documents. Never heard about
> Oklahoma. (Anybody?)

I've lived in the shadow of Oklahoma for most of my life, and the only place
I've seen an Oklahoma state highway referenced as "O-xx" is in Tom From
Ohio's posts.

--

Keith

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Oct 19, 2004, 10:10:07 PM10/19/04
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"MC Pee Pants" <watuzi...@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:<2tl85pF...@uni-berlin.de>...


You are Tom from Ohio. Just admit it.

I-420

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Oct 20, 2004, 8:52:26 PM10/20/04
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sirke...@hotmail.com (Keith) wrote in message news:<ca5da64.04101...@posting.google.com>...

Queef, explain to me what basis you have for this assumption that this
is Tom From Ohio? I would be interested in that, because I think
you're wrong as usual. I doubt he knows enough about Ohio to even
attempt to do something like that. I swear, if you want to see a
troll, look in the mirror :-P

Keith

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Oct 21, 2004, 9:29:33 AM10/21/04
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jct...@yahoo.com (I-420) wrote in message news:<2338e6f2.04102...@posting.google.com>...


Ask anyone here. I have many people who told me that Jeremy is Tom
From Ohio. Maybe it is you, Trent instead.

MC Pee Pants

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Oct 21, 2004, 1:12:52 PM10/21/04
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Somebody told me that Queef has a 1 3/4 inch long penis.

--

Justin Priola

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Oct 21, 2004, 4:57:12 PM10/21/04
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nbVI...@hotmail.com (rghYQM) wrote in message news:<f47fb570.04101...@posting.google.com>...

From my experience, in Louisiana, state highways are often referred to
as "LA nn" or "highway nn." For US routes, the most common practice
is "Highway nn" (as in the Highway 11 [US 11] bridge). For
interstates it's just "I-nn."

That is, of course, if they even think in terms of the route number.
In metro N.O. most LA and US highways are referred to by name. I
sometimes wonder if people even know that they have numbers. (The way
some routes are scantily posted, I can see why.) When you get out of
the urbanized area, numbers begin to predominate in reference.

Justin Priola

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