"Highway" or "Route"

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mwalcoff

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Jul 25, 2001, 11:11:29 PM7/25/01
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I was kind of surprised to find that Ontario uses the terminology "High-
way 401" rather than "Route 401," especially since using the word
"route" would give them one less thing to have to translate into
French.

Anyway, here's a quick, two-question survey:

1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as "High-
way 55" or "Route 55"?

2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to hear
"Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."

Please refrain from comments about the real Route or Highway 55 in your
location or miles vs. kilometers :).

Matt

Jeff Kitsko

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Jul 25, 2001, 11:26:14 PM7/25/01
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"mwalcoff" <mwal...@onecom.com> wrote in message
news:820fd90d.01072...@posting.google.com...

> I was kind of surprised to find that Ontario uses the terminology "High-
> way 401" rather than "Route 401," especially since using the word
> "route" would give them one less thing to have to translate into
> French.
>
> Anyway, here's a quick, two-question survey:
>
> 1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as "High-
> way 55" or "Route 55"?

In Pennsylvania, "route" is mostly used.

> 2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to hear
> "Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."

"Take 55 for 10 miles," but really it would be "Take route 55 for 10 miles."

--
Jeff Kitsko
Pennsylvania Highways: http://www.pahighways.com/
Pittsburgh Highways: http://www.pahighways.com/pghhwys/
Philadelphia Highways: http://www.pahighways.com/phlhwys/

Presnwap

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Jul 25, 2001, 11:45:54 PM7/25/01
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New Orleans is so "innocent" and messed up, (people asking for Barq's root
beer in other parts of the country; backing up on interstates, etc.) People
refer to every single freeway here and elsewhere since we only have one 2di
as "the I-10". "Ohhh take the I-10 to Mobile and take it ["the" I-10] to
Montgomery where you'll..." People here think other cities are weird
because you can't buy alcohol on Sundays; heck, you can walk down the street
with an open container! To go even further off topic, Louisiana doesn't
care about drinking and driving! We got drive-thru daquiri shops. (They
just can't hand you the drink with the straw in it.) Safety first!!!!
Sorry for getting off-topic.

"mwalcoff" <mwal...@onecom.com> wrote in message
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Ben Kiene

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Jul 25, 2001, 11:55:21 PM7/25/01
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mwalcoff wrote:

"Route" is seldom used in Colorado. "Highway" or just the highway number
alone are most commonly used. The government documents I've seen mentioning
state highways always call them "State Highways" or use the abbreviation
"SH". I've never heard "the" put in front of any road numbers here, which
is surprising given the large number of Californians (don't they usually say
"the 10" or "the 405"?) who've moved here.

Ben Kiene

Michael G. Koerner

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Jul 26, 2001, 12:22:07 AM7/26/01
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It is EXCLUSIVELY 'highway' here in Wisconsin. Nearly every numbered or
lettered road is 'Highway (xx)'. Interestingly, though, locals here in
the Appleton area ALWAYS refer to the WI 441 freeway as simply
"Four-forty-one". The word 'highway' is often omitted in casual
conversation for other highways, too, but it is not prevalent.
Interstates are spoken as "Eye-(xx)". Milwaukeeans will often omit the
'Eye' part, though.

BTW, the EASIEST way to tell the Illinoisian from a bunch of
Wisconsinites in a casual group is that the Illinoisian will refer to
them as 'Routes' (pronounced as 'Rout').

--
____________________________________________________________________________
Regards,

Michael G. Koerner
Appleton, WI

***NOTICE*** SPAMfilter in use, please remove ALL 'i's from the return
address to reply. ***NOTICE***
____________________________________________________________________________

BD

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Jul 26, 2001, 1:38:56 AM7/26/01
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Well.. here is what it is referred to where I've been in my lifetime...

In Chicago, and most of the state of Illinois I gather, most of the time
Interstates are referred to as "Interstate xx" or "I-xx" or more importantly
by their name "The Eisenhowe Expressway" or "The Ike", however U.S. and
Illinois state routes are usually referred to as "Route xx." On BGS advance
mile signange IDOT refers to U.S. routes as either "U.S. Route xx" or "U.S.
xx," while the same signage refers to Illinois state routes as "Illinois
xx."

In Indiana, Hoosiers refer to Interstates as "I-xx" or "Interstate xx," U.S.
routes are referred to as "Route xx" and Indiana state roads are either
referred to as "Route xx" or "State road xx." INDOT usually referrs to them
on BGS advance mileage signage as "I-xx", "U.S. xx" and "S.R. xx"
respectively.

For most of the cases above it is appropos to refer to the routes simply by
their number: "Take 65 for 10 miles" or "Take 52 when it splits from 41."

Now here in Missouri, they do things backwards. All roads here are referred
to as "Highway xx" whether it be an interstate, a U.S. route, a state route,
or one of the lettered secondary state routes. Simply put, I-70 is referred
to as "Highway 70", I-64 is referred to as "Highway 40" (Go figure!), MO 370
is referred to as "Highway 370" and SDR K is referred to as "Highway K." On
newer BGS signage going up in the state, advance mileage signs refer to
everything as "Route I-70", "Rtes I-64, 40 & 61", or "Routes 364 & D." On
some of them they add a "JCT" to produce "JCT Rte I-270" or "JCT Route
I-70", no rhyme nor reason for when they add a "JCT" on those BGS's.

"mwalcoff" <mwal...@onecom.com> wrote in message
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robert cruickshank

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Jul 26, 2001, 1:02:11 AM7/26/01
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mwalcoff wrote:
>
> I was kind of surprised to find that Ontario uses the terminology "High-
> way 401" rather than "Route 401," especially since using the word
> "route" would give them one less thing to have to translate into
> French.
>
> Anyway, here's a quick, two-question survey:
>
> 1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as "High-
> way 55" or "Route 55"?

Officially, Caltrans refers to all numbered roads in California as
"routes".

In the Bay Area, I hear "highway" a lot. Especially from older folk who
have lived a while in the Bay Area. One such friend consistently
referred to the interstate serving his home of Vallejo as "Highway 80".
And if it's not "highway", they'll just refer to the route number alone:
"Take 80 north to 37 west..." It's a point of Bay Area pride that they
don't do the LA thing and call a freeway "the 80".



> 2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to hear
> "Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."

Of course, most people know that here in Southern California, freeways
get definite articles. You don't much hear people other than traffic
reporters refer to freeways by their given names (San Diego Freeway,
Hollywood Freeway), it's always "the 405", "the 101", and yes, "the 55".



> Please refrain from comments about the real Route or Highway 55 in your
> location or miles vs. kilometers :).

Sorry. Take THE 55 (aka route 55) for 10 miles and, about an hour later,
you'll be in Newport Beach. ;)

--
Robert I. Cruickshank
roadgeek, historian, progressive

Luke W.

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Jul 26, 2001, 7:42:24 AM7/26/01
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Not that it matters much anyway, but I can tell you how it is here in
Australia at a national level. We have both National Highways AND routes,
but people more often say "Highway 1" or whatever, even if it's a National
Route.

In terms of states... we're more likely to refer to roads by their names
rather than numbers, at least in New South Wales, but if anything we would
say "Route xx" instead of State Route. (In the states with European
numbering are simply referred to as the C123, for example.)

--
-- Luke Wright
Webmaster of M-Zero (Australian Roads) -- http://mzero.cjb.net/
(currently down)

"mwalcoff" <mwal...@onecom.com> wrote in message
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emeier

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Jul 26, 2001, 8:11:25 AM7/26/01
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>
> In Indiana, Hoosiers refer to Interstates as "I-xx" or "Interstate xx," U.S.
> routes are referred to as "Route xx" and Indiana state roads are either
> referred to as "Route xx" or "State road xx." INDOT usually referrs to them
> on BGS advance mileage signage as "I-xx", "U.S. xx" and "S.R. xx"
> respectively.
>
I've heard highways refered to several ways in diffent regions in
Indiana. Around South Bend all state roads are called just that:
"State Road 23"

But go one county west to LaPorte and US and Ind roads are both called
highways "Highway 20" and "Highway 212" for US 20 and IND 212.

I think some state roads in Lake County are called State Routes (must
be an Illinois influence). I've never heard anyone refer to I-94/80
as the Borman. Its simply "80/94". However the Indiana Toll Road is
always the "Toll Road" and not "90" or "80/90"

They also use the term "highway" down around New
Albany/Clarksville/Jeffersonville

emeier

Ron Newman

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Jul 26, 2001, 8:49:23 AM7/26/01
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In article <820fd90d.01072...@posting.google.com>,
mwal...@onecom.com (mwalcoff) wrote:

> 1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as "High-
> way 55" or "Route 55"?

Always "Route 28", never "Highway 28", in Massachusetts.

> 2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to hear
> "Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."

You might say "take 28" or "take route 28", but you'd never say
"take the 28".

--
Ron Newman rne...@thecia.net
http://www2.thecia.net/users/rnewman/

Pete from Boston

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Jul 26, 2001, 12:23:48 PM7/26/01
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mwal...@onecom.com (mwalcoff) wrote in message news:<820fd90d.01072...@posting.google.com>...

> I was kind of surprised to find that Ontario uses the terminology "High-
> way 401" rather than "Route 401," especially since using the word
> "route" would give them one less thing to have to translate into
> French.
>
> Anyway, here's a quick, two-question survey:
>
> 1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as "High-
> way 55" or "Route 55"?
>
> 2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to hear
> "Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."

1. When I lived in NJ, everything was "route." Never would you hear
"Interstate 80," "US 1," or anything. It's just "route 17, route 3,
route 80, route 1." The only variation was a total absence of the
modifier, which was common too; e.g. "287" or "46." "Highway"? Never
used as a modifier in my experience.

Here in Mass., it's pretty much the same, although it seems selective.
For example, you'd always say "Route 2" or "Route 9." Those are
givens. But I've always heard "1A," and cannot recall hearing "Route
1A." Same with 128. Interstates you're not likely to hear any modifier
with.

2. I lived with a guy from California one semester at UMass, and,
being largely unaware of anything beyond Albany at the time, cringed
each time he mentioned taking "the 91." I've lived in the northeast my
whole life and never heard this from a local. Only named highways
(sometimes) get this. Like, "the Mass Pike," but never "the Storrow
Drive."

I love linguistics, though, and love to consider the different
connotation that seems to bring to my eastern ears. "The 91" refers to
an inanimate concrete object in my perception, while simply "91"
connotes a place, or -- if you will -- an occurrence, an ongoing event
almost.

BD

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Jul 26, 2001, 11:53:18 AM7/26/01
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"emeier" <emei...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:5ab4ed74.01072...@posting.google.com...

> >
> > In Indiana, Hoosiers refer to Interstates as "I-xx" or "Interstate xx,"
U.S.
> > routes are referred to as "Route xx" and Indiana state roads are either
> > referred to as "Route xx" or "State road xx." INDOT usually referrs to
them
> > on BGS advance mileage signage as "I-xx", "U.S. xx" and "S.R. xx"
> > respectively.
> >
> I've heard highways refered to several ways in diffent regions in
> Indiana. Around South Bend all state roads are called just that:
> "State Road 23"
>

I think the majority of the state uses "State Road XX." Just about
everywhere I've been in the state, and I've been to just about all of
it--heck I grew up there--the predominent vernacular is "State Road XX"

> But go one county west to LaPorte and US and Ind roads are both called
> highways "Highway 20" and "Highway 212" for US 20 and IND 212.
>
> I think some state roads in Lake County are called State Routes (must
> be an Illinois influence). I've never heard anyone refer to I-94/80
> as the Borman. Its simply "80/94". However the Indiana Toll Road is
> always the "Toll Road" and not "90" or "80/90"
>

I guess you don't listen to traffic reports or talk to people up in "Da
Region." Many times does Shadow Traffic and Metro Traffic refer to 80/94 as
"The Borman." I grew up a stones throw away from the road and many people I
associated with when I grew up referred to the road as "The Borman." Irony
was that I had a friend who's father was named Frank Borman and my friend
always boasted that the highway was named after his father.

Michael King

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Jul 26, 2001, 12:37:00 PM7/26/01
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Growing up in Lake Co. (IN), we just referred to "Route" 6 or "Route" 12 &
20 or "Route" 30.

Once in a great while, you might hear "State Route", but not often at all.
Matter of fact the only road that I recall hearing was for IN 152 (Indpls.
Blvd. in Hammond).

Here in Georgia, you'll hear of Route 5 (GA 5) & Route 6 (GA 6), but GA 400
is ALWAYS referred to as Georgia 400.

M

"emeier" <emei...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
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> >

Kenny Dancy

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Jul 26, 2001, 12:59:58 PM7/26/01
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"mwalcoff" <mwal...@onecom.com> wrote in message
news:820fd90d.01072...@posting.google.com...
> I was kind of surprised to find that Ontario uses the terminology "High-
> way 401" rather than "Route 401," especially since using the word
> "route" would give them one less thing to have to translate into
> French.
>
> Anyway, here's a quick, two-question survey:
>
> 1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as "High-
> way 55" or "Route 55"?

the VA/NC border seems to be the dividing line for Route vs Highway. VA
uses Route for state, US and Interstates. In NC, I have seen the older
white wooden street signs that use the word route in them as in "TO route
xx, 2 miles", but highway is almost always used.

>
> 2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to hear
> "Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."

Take Route 55 for 10 miles

N.W.Perry

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Jul 26, 2001, 1:56:34 PM7/26/01
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"Ron Newman" <rne...@thecia.net> wrote in message
news:rnewman-2607...@ppp39-63.thecia.net...

> In article <820fd90d.01072...@posting.google.com>,
> mwal...@onecom.com (mwalcoff) wrote:
>
> > 1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as "High-
> > way 55" or "Route 55"?
>
> Always "Route 28", never "Highway 28", in Massachusetts.

Also, "Route 95", never "I-95". Also, "Route 128", never "Route 95" for the
Yankee Division Highway.


>
> > 2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to hear
> > "Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."
>
> You might say "take 28" or "take route 28", but you'd never say
> "take the 28".

I'd avoid either altogether, opting for blow-by-blow directions. Following
marked routes in Massachusetts is hazardous.


N.W.Perry

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Jul 26, 2001, 2:06:26 PM7/26/01
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For New York:

1) "Route 441" or "Route 104" or "Route 390" in speech and non-official
writing. In casual speech, "route" is usually omitted. "Take 63 to 20A..."
or "Get off 390 at Ridge." (Exit numbers are rarely used in conversation,
except by me.) For Interstates, the above usually applies, but you will also
sometimes hear "I-81" or "I-90", though not usually for 3dis. NYSTA marks
overpasses with "Route 88", "Route 11", but "I-81".

In my area, a big multiplex is Us 20 and NY 5. This is called "Routes 5 and
20" or simply "Fiventwenny". I don't know of other overlaps that are so
called, usually the major or straight-through route is chosen.

A pet peeve I have is referring to "route 19 north" when you don't mean
northbound but rather north of an assumed starting point. An ad might say
that the Tops supermarket in Warsaw is on "route 19 north". It's actually on
the SB side, but is simply north of the village. But what if you're in
Wyoming? It's south of that village, but you're still likely to be reading a
Warsaw publication with that ad.

2) The definite article is *never* used for numbered routes.

"mwalcoff" <mwal...@onecom.com> wrote in message
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PRDem3

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Jul 26, 2001, 2:34:16 PM7/26/01
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>1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as "High-
>way 55" or "Route 55"?
>

In Illinois, I would say neither are used. We just would say "55". Such as,
"Yeah, 55 was real busy today." But "route" is probably used more often.

>2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to hear
>"Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."

"Take 55 for 10 miles". I noticed they say "the 55" in LA. Though I've never
been to California, just from TV shows that are set in LA I've heard them say,
"Take the 105 to the 110 to the 101."

Kevin Olmstead

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Jul 26, 2001, 2:38:14 PM7/26/01
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Here in Bradford County, PA, we either take Route 6 or we take 6. Same
goes for 14, 414, 514, 220, 199, 187, 467, 706, 367, et al.
Strange as it sounds, about half of the people here take "state Route
1055" rather than "Battle Creek Road" I guess that's because some of
those farm-to-market roads change names when they cross municipal
lines

Kevin Olmstead

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Jul 26, 2001, 2:43:04 PM7/26/01
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As a Saints fan who happened to attend the final Bills game at Rich
Stadium (before it was renamed after that egomaniac owner guy. What's
his name again?) I can assure you that on a given autumn Sunday in
Orchard Park, NY, you can walk down the street with an open container
and a cop looking right at you and he'll just wave you across the
street.

Scott Murdock

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Jul 26, 2001, 3:17:25 PM7/26/01
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In the KC area on *rare* occasion I might hear a "route 7" or a "route
40". Primarily "highway" is the word used, but more often neither word
is used...


For the interstates, it's alwayas "I-29" or "I-670" in writing, but in
everyday speech the "I-" prefix is dropped and people just say "435 and
Gregory" or "take 35 south to 87th".

For the US routes, it's usually "Highway 40", "U.S. 50", or "Hwy. 71" in
writing, but in everyday speech the order gets reversed and people say
"40 highway" or "Old 56 highway". On the US highays the word "highway"
is seldom dropped in speech.

For the state routes, it depends in the side of the state line. For
Kansas state highways people say "K-10" (kay ten) or "K-7" (kay seven).
For Missouri state highways no distinction between US and state gets
made, and people simply say "7 highway" or "350 highway". 7 and 350
are two examples where the "highway" suffix is virtually always included
in speech, but some other highways are more often heard with the
"highway" portion dropped, and people just say "291" or "152".

Missouri's supplemental routes, at least around here, have a more
complicated set of "rules". If it's a single letter such as route Z or
route D, the common practice is to just say the letter without the word
"highway". If it's two letters that are different, such as RA, the
common practice is to pronounce both letters separately without the word
"highway". However, if both letters are the name and they are vowels,
such as AA or OO, you would pronounce both letters separately (and
optionally follow it with "highway") when refering to a road you are not
intimately familiar with. If you are intimately familiar with the road
and the road name is AA, EE, II, or OO (but never with UU) you would say
the word "double" followed by the letter and then optionally add
"highway". ("Double A" or "Double A Highway".) If the letters are the
same and are consonants, however, you always never heard the "double"
variation used and people just say "BB" or "BB Highway".


-Scott-

Dan Garnell

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Jul 26, 2001, 3:20:25 PM7/26/01
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mwal...@onecom.com (mwalcoff) wrote in message news:<820fd90d.01072...@posting.google.com>...
> I was kind of surprised to find that Ontario uses the terminology "High-
> way 401" rather than "Route 401," especially since using the word
> "route" would give them one less thing to have to translate into
> French.
>
> Anyway, here's a quick, two-question survey:
>
> 1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as "High-
> way 55" or "Route 55"?
>
> 2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to hear
> "Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."
>

There is only one terminology that I am familar with in Michigan:
"M-55."
No Rte-zz, no Hwy-zz; just M-zz.

With respect to Ohio, I am most familiar with "Route 55", especially
in directions from Toledo to Cedar Point, as in "take Route 2..."

Dan Garnell
djg...@yahoo.com

Abanico De Caminos

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Jul 26, 2001, 5:08:55 PM7/26/01
to
mwal...@onecom.com (mwalcoff) wrote in message news:<820fd90d.01072...@posting.google.com>...
> I was kind of surprised to find that Ontario uses the terminology "High-
> way 401" rather than "Route 401," especially since using the word
> "route" would give them one less thing to have to translate into
> French.

That's probably why they use it. If they use "route" people will think
they're Quebecois, and English-speaking areas and French-speaking
areas never get along for no reason.

>
> Anyway, here's a quick, two-question survey:
>
> 1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as "High-
> way 55" or "Route 55"?
>
> 2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to hear
> "Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."
>
> Please refrain from comments about the real Route or Highway 55 in your
> location or miles vs. kilometers :).

Usually if it's two digits, Highway 36 or just 36. (Grenada, MS uses
Number 7 and Number 8, apparently, but in the three times I've been
there I've never talked to anybody there.) Three-digit roads are
sometimes referred to by number, but they're usually referred to by
either official or colloquial names. For example, in my county, MS336
is "Turnpike Road", MS345 is "Cherry Creek Road", and MS342 is "Black
Zion Road". However, MS341 is called "Highway 341". I know that the
road officially named Thaxton Road here is often called Hurricane
Road, but the road at its north end, MS346, is officially called
Hurricane Road. I have no idea what people call 346.

Here, you usually don't use "miles". You usually say "go until this
landmark and turn left, then go a short ways (short ways = at least 15
miles :-) ) until where this landmark USED to be...".

Sorry if I got off-topic.

>
> Matt

Michael King

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Jul 26, 2001, 4:47:25 PM7/26/01
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Agreed...

Where did you grow up/go to school?

I grew up in Gary and came out of Roosevelt in '80...

M

"BD" <b...@bd.com> wrote in message news:GH385...@news.boeing.com...

James Lin

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Jul 26, 2001, 5:37:40 PM7/26/01
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In Northern California, you say either "101" or "Highway 101". ("The 80" is
only used by Southern California transplants.)

In Southern California, you say "the 101" (or "the Hollywood" :) ).

AFAIK, the only people who use "Route" in California are Caltrans engineers
in written documents.

- Jim
--
James Lin
jl...@ugcs.caltech.edu

http://www.ugcs.caltech.edu/~jlin/

Ron Newman

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Jul 26, 2001, 4:18:56 PM7/26/01
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On Thu, 26 Jul 2001 13:56:34 -0400, in article
<9jpm73$2ndc$1...@node21.cwnet.roc.gblx.net>, "N.W.Perry" stated...

>
>> Always "Route 28", never "Highway 28", in Massachusetts.
>
>Also, "Route 95", never "I-95".

I've heard people say "I-95", meaning the parts north and south of
Route 128, not the part shared with it.

On the other hand, nobody says "I-90". It's "the Pike" or "the Mass Pike"
or "the Turnpike".

>> You might say "take 28" or "take route 28", but you'd never say
>> "take the 28".
>
>I'd avoid either altogether, opting for blow-by-blow directions. Following
>marked routes in Massachusetts is hazardous.

I'd never try to follow 28 (a good example) in the Boston metro area,
but signing is pretty good once you get outside cities. You could easily
drive Route 2 from Alewife in Cambridge to the NY state line without
making any wrong turns.

--
Ron Newman rne...@thecia.net
http://www2.thecia.net/users/rnewman/home.html

Jason L. Bennett

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Jul 26, 2001, 5:48:06 PM7/26/01
to
"N.W.Perry" wrote:
>
> For New York:
>
> 1) "Route 441" or "Route 104" or "Route 390" in speech and non-official
> writing. In casual speech, "route" is usually omitted. "Take 63 to 20A..."
> or "Get off 390 at Ridge." (Exit numbers are rarely used in conversation,
> except by me.) For Interstates, the above usually applies, but you will also
> sometimes hear "I-81" or "I-90", though not usually for 3dis. NYSTA marks
> overpasses with "Route 88", "Route 11", but "I-81".

Locals will call the Thruway by that name, and not use it's numbers.

> In my area, a big multiplex is Us 20 and NY 5. This is called "Routes 5 and
> 20" or simply "Fiventwenny". I don't know of other overlaps that are so
> called, usually the major or straight-through route is chosen.

We've got NY 5-8-12 here in Utica. Sometimes we call it "the
Arterial", other times "five eight & twelve".
Then there's NY 26-46-49-69 in Rome. It's never called by the
numbers, just by it's name "Erie Blvd."

> A pet peeve I have is referring to "route 19 north" when you don't mean
> northbound but rather north of an assumed starting point. An ad might say
> that the Tops supermarket in Warsaw is on "route 19 north". It's actually on
> the SB side, but is simply north of the village. But what if you're in
> Wyoming? It's south of that village, but you're still likely to be reading a
> Warsaw publication with that ad.

Also, some advertisers may say "Route 19N". As if there's a NY 19N!

Jason L. Bennett
Oriskany, NY
--
When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire
Department usually uses water.

Jason L. Bennett

unread,
Jul 26, 2001, 5:53:28 PM7/26/01
to
Jeff Kitsko wrote:
>
> "mwalcoff" <mwal...@onecom.com> wrote in message
> news:820fd90d.01072...@posting.google.com...
> > I was kind of surprised to find that Ontario uses the terminology "High-
> > way 401" rather than "Route 401," especially since using the word
> > "route" would give them one less thing to have to translate into
> > French.
> >
> > Anyway, here's a quick, two-question survey:
> >
> > 1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as "High-
> > way 55" or "Route 55"?
>
> In Pennsylvania, "route" is mostly used.
>
> > 2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to hear
> > "Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."
>
> "Take 55 for 10 miles," but really it would be "Take route 55 for 10 miles."

At least in northwestern PA, one hardly ever uses "Route xx". Rather,
you'd be given it's name. Such as, "Take Duke Center Road..." versus
"Take Route 546...".

Robert Cote

unread,
Jul 26, 2001, 6:04:40 PM7/26/01
to
In article <9jq2j4$u9r$1...@agate.berkeley.edu>,
"James Lin" <jl...@ugcs.caltech.edu> wrote:

> In Northern California, you say either "101" or "Highway 101". ("The 80" is
> only used by Southern California transplants.)
>
> In Southern California, you say "the 101" (or "the Hollywood" :) ).

"The Hollywood Freeway." Except whne the 101 is the "Ventura
Freeway." In either case the variants are; "101 southbound at Canoga"
or "Hollywood NB at the 10" but never just"the Hollywood "

> AFAIK, the only people who use "Route" in California are Caltrans engineers
> in written documents.

I've often heard "California Route One; PCH" but you are correct for
the other "99" percent including the aforementined "101." ;-)

James Lin

unread,
Jul 26, 2001, 6:08:10 PM7/26/01
to
"Robert Cote" <tech...@gte.net> wrote in message
news:Xt087.1255$ou4.2...@paloalto-snr1.gtei.net...

> In article <9jq2j4$u9r$1...@agate.berkeley.edu>,
> "James Lin" <jl...@ugcs.caltech.edu> wrote:
>
> > In Southern California, you say "the 101" (or "the Hollywood" :) ).
>
> "The Hollywood Freeway." Except whne the 101 is the "Ventura
> Freeway." In either case the variants are; "101 southbound at Canoga"
> or "Hollywood NB at the 10" but never just"the Hollywood "

Is "Freeway" ever omitted for other freeways, like the Santa Monica or San
Bernardino Freeways?

> I've often heard "California Route One; PCH" but you are correct for
> the other "99" percent including the aforementined "101." ;-)

:) And BTW (not necessarily directed to just you, Robert), no one in
Northern California knows what "PCH" is, but everyone knows "Highway 1."

A Gilson

unread,
Jul 26, 2001, 6:13:03 PM7/26/01
to
It's like that in central PA too, at least for a few roads. For example, I
hear "Jonestown Road," outside of Harrisburg, referred to by that name more
than by Route 22. Of course, I think that when routes like 22 and 322 go all
over the place, from highway to suburban street... the streets are referred
to more by their name than their number.

Adam Gilson
gils...@etown.edu

Robert Cote

unread,
Jul 26, 2001, 6:30:07 PM7/26/01
to
In article <9jq4cb$105m$1...@agate.berkeley.edu>,
"James Lin" <jl...@ugcs.caltech.edu> wrote:

> "Robert Cote" <tech...@gte.net> wrote in message
> news:Xt087.1255$ou4.2...@paloalto-snr1.gtei.net...
> > In article <9jq2j4$u9r$1...@agate.berkeley.edu>,
> > "James Lin" <jl...@ugcs.caltech.edu> wrote:
> >
> > > In Southern California, you say "the 101" (or "the Hollywood" :) ).
> >
> > "The Hollywood Freeway." Except whne the 101 is the "Ventura
> > Freeway." In either case the variants are; "101 southbound at Canoga"
> > or "Hollywood NB at the 10" but never just"the Hollywood "
>
> Is "Freeway" ever omitted for other freeways, like the Santa Monica or San
> Bernardino Freeways?

Yes. "Westbound on the Santa Monica" or "westbound on the 10" are
both typical newstraffic reporter shorthand descriptions. I suspect
that it is more a factor of alitteration and airtime restrictions than
one of precise definitions.

>
> > I've often heard "California Route One; PCH" but you are correct for
> > the other "99" percent including the aforementined "101." ;-)
>
> :) And BTW (not necessarily directed to just you, Robert), no one in
> Northern California knows what "PCH" is, but everyone knows "Highway 1."

Is that the same as "Rowte One?" Sorry, couldn't resist. You are
correct. All the more reason to Seperate SF from LA with at least 3
intermediating States.

Adam Froehlig

unread,
Jul 26, 2001, 6:52:27 PM7/26/01
to
> 1. When I lived in NJ, everything was "route." Never would you hear
> "Interstate 80," "US 1," or anything. It's just "route 17, route 3,
> route 80, route 1." The only variation was a total absence of the
> modifier, which was common too; e.g. "287" or "46." "Highway"? Never
> used as a modifier in my experience.

Still pretty much the case. For the fiancee, and most others I know in
Jersey, its "route xx" (pronounced "root"), including the Interstates
(Route 78, Route 287, Route 80, etc etc). Occasionally, Interstates did
not have a modifier ("95", "195"). The NJ Turnpike is "the Turnpike",
while the GSP is "the Parkway".

Froggie | "Other half" in Roselle Park, NJ |
http://www.ajfroggie.com/roads/

BD

unread,
Jul 26, 2001, 6:44:42 PM7/26/01
to
I went to Andrean, Class of 95. I grew up in the Ross Township portion of
Crown Point and would have gone to Merrillville H.S. if I hadn't gone to
Andrean. I spent 4.5 years at Purdue and 9 months in South Bend while I was
in college. I have friends strewn across the state from Kokomo to Munie to
Ft. Wayne to Indianapolis to the southern tip near Louisville, so I speak
from expience when I say how Hoosiers (the good kind) refer to their roads.
Maybe a couple outliers refer to them differently, but when you get into the
state.. it's "I-65", "Route 52", and "State Road 25." Just about the only
thing the state cannot agree on is what time zone and/or daylight saving
time mode it wants to be on.

I now digress...

"Michael King" <mhk...@mediaone.net> wrote in message
news:xl%77.336$xA3.2...@typhoon.jacksonville.mediaone.net...

Adam Froehlig

unread,
Jul 26, 2001, 7:05:00 PM7/26/01
to
> Usually if it's two digits, Highway 36 or just 36.

Taking Mississippi one step further, US highways are usually also
referred to by "Highway" (i.e. Highway 84, Highway 45, Highway 90).
Interstates are usually "I-xx" (I-20, I-55), although in many areas
(such as I-20/59 through Lauderdale County, or I-10 along the Gulf
Coast), they are referred to simply as "the Interstate".

> Three-digit roads are sometimes referred to by number, but they're
> usually referred to by either official or colloquial names.

In most cases, Mississippi 3di's do not have street/road names, and as
such are called by their route number (i.e. Highway 495, Highway 603,
Highway 512).

> Here, you usually don't use "miles". You usually say "go until this
> landmark and turn left, then go a short ways (short ways = at least
> 15 miles :-) ) until where this landmark USED to be...".

One reason for this (besides Southerners being used to "landmarks") is
that, except for the Interstates and US 78, Mississippi does not use
milemarkers.

Now, moving on to Minnesota, state and US routes are usually called
"highways" (Highway 10, Highway 23). County routes are "County" or
"County Road" (County 6, County Road 42). Interstates are usually
"I-xx" (I-35, I-94, I-90). In many cases, particularily with Twin
Cities freeways, the modifier is omitted (169, 35W, 394). Most locals
refer to the MN 62 freeway in the Twin Cities as "the Crosstown" (myself
included, since I grew up a block from it). US 52 between I-494 and
I-94 is commonly referred to as "the Lafayette Freeway".

Froggie | Long Beach, MS (formerly of Minneapolis, MN) |
http://www.ajfroggie.com/roads/

Bill Mitchell

unread,
Jul 26, 2001, 7:15:58 PM7/26/01
to
mass...@my-deja.com (Pete from Boston) wrote in message > mwal...@onecom.com (mwalcoff) wrote in message > > I was kind of surprised to find that Ontario uses the terminology "High-

> > way 401" rather than "Route 401," especially since using the word
> > "route" would give them one less thing to have to translate into
> > French.
> >
> > Anyway, here's a quick, two-question survey:
> >
> > 1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as "High-
> > way 55" or "Route 55"?
> >
> > 2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to hear
> > "Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."
>
> 1. When I lived in NJ, everything was "route." Never would you hear
> "Interstate 80," "US 1," or anything. It's just "route 17, route 3,
> route 80, route 1." The only variation was a total absence of the
> modifier, which was common too; e.g. "287" or "46." "Highway"? Never
> used as a modifier in my experience.
>
> Here in Mass., it's pretty much the same, although it seems selective.
> For example, you'd always say "Route 2" or "Route 9." Those are
> givens. But I've always heard "1A," and cannot recall hearing "Route
> 1A." Same with 128. Interstates you're not likely to hear any modifier
> with.

Same here, in NJ, they are either route xx or simply xx, never I-xx,
US xx and especially never "the xx". Ditto also for US 9W, which is
called "9W", I don't remember hearing it called route 9W. Across the
river in New York, highways are more often than not refered to by
their name rather than their route number, and often just as the name,
example "The Cross Bronx" with the word Expressway or parkway left
off. One exception to this is 495, The LIE.

Scott Estrin

unread,
Jul 26, 2001, 8:25:19 PM7/26/01
to
Agreed (regarding New Jersey)... it's either Route 18, Route 1, or just 18 or 1. I guess it depends on the
context whether the "route" is included or not. Most of the county roads, at least in the northern half of
NJ, go by name and not by number, however. "I-" is sometimes used in writing, but never in speech... and
people drive "on the highway", not "on the interstate" or "on the freeway".

Native Jerseyites refer to the toll road heading to the shore as "the Parkway", while people from New York
(especially Long Island) call it "the Garden State", probably because they are used to the Southern State
Pkwy, the Northern State Pkwy, etc.

Two exceptions I've noticed in New Jersey though:

1) (NJ) Route 42 west of the Atlantic City Expressway is always referred to as "The 42 Freeway"

2) In his song Born to Run, Bruce Springsteen sings of being "...sprung from cages on Highway 9...", and
despite having spent a lot of time on Route (US) 9 in his hometown of Freehold, NJ, I've never, ever heard
anyone refer to it as "Highway 9". That's always bothered me.

Michael Angelo Ravera

unread,
Jul 26, 2001, 9:19:38 PM7/26/01
to
In California, if the number of the route is polysylabic, it will be
used in isolation with or without the defiite article. e.g. "680" or
"237" or "the 405".

When the number of the route is one sylable, an additional designation
of some sort is required. People differ when the number is precisely
two sylables. e.g. "highway 2", "Interstate 5" or "eye-five", "highway
16", but just "80".

Definite articles are ALWAYS (ditch, bay, or movieland) used when
refering to a route by its name whne it has a number with or without
the type of facilty. e.g. "The James Lick Freeway"

robert cruickshank <r...@washington.edu> wrote in message news:<3B5FA453...@washington.edu>...


> mwalcoff wrote:
> >
> > I was kind of surprised to find that Ontario uses the terminology "High-
> > way 401" rather than "Route 401," especially since using the word
> > "route" would give them one less thing to have to translate into
> > French.
> >
> > Anyway, here's a quick, two-question survey:
> >
> > 1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as "High-
> > way 55" or "Route 55"?
>

> Officially, Caltrans refers to all numbered roads in California as
> "routes".
>
> In the Bay Area, I hear "highway" a lot. Especially from older folk who
> have lived a while in the Bay Area. One such friend consistently
> referred to the interstate serving his home of Vallejo as "Highway 80".
> And if it's not "highway", they'll just refer to the route number alone:
> "Take 80 north to 37 west..." It's a point of Bay Area pride that they
> don't do the LA thing and call a freeway "the 80".


>
> > 2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to hear
> > "Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."
>

> Of course, most people know that here in Southern California, freeways
> get definite articles. You don't much hear people other than traffic
> reporters refer to freeways by their given names (San Diego Freeway,
> Hollywood Freeway), it's always "the 405", "the 101", and yes, "the 55".


>
> > Please refrain from comments about the real Route or Highway 55 in your
> > location or miles vs. kilometers :).
>

> Sorry. Take THE 55 (aka route 55) for 10 miles and, about an hour later,
> you'll be in Newport Beach. ;)

Steve

unread,
Jul 26, 2001, 9:45:20 PM7/26/01
to

mwalcoff <mwal...@onecom.com> wrote in message
news:820fd90d.01072...@posting.google.com...
> I was kind of surprised to find that Ontario uses the terminology "High-
> way 401" rather than "Route 401," especially since using the word
> "route" would give them one less thing to have to translate into
> French.
>
> Anyway, here's a quick, two-question survey:
>
> 1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as "High-
> way 55" or "Route 55"?

In South Jersey, we refer to our expressways as either route xx or, just
plain xx, for example "Route 55" or "55". Some surface street routes, we
refer to by number, while some are referred to by name. For example, the
terms "47" and "Delsea Drive" are used interchangably. On the other hand,
US-30 is more commonly referred to as "White Horse Pike" ("Admiral Wilson
Boulevard" through Camden). Very few people refer to it as "30".

> 2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to hear
> "Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."

Here, you'd be more likely to hear "take 55 for 10 miles".

> Please refrain from comments about the real Route or Highway 55 in your
> location or miles vs. kilometers :).
>

> Matt


Rich Dean

unread,
Jul 26, 2001, 10:39:19 PM7/26/01
to
mwal...@onecom.com (mwalcoff) wrote in message news:<820fd90d.01072...@posting.google.com>...
> I was kind of surprised to find that Ontario uses the terminology "High-
> way 401" rather than "Route 401," especially since using the word
> "route" would give them one less thing to have to translate into
> French.
>
> Anyway, here's a quick, two-question survey:
>
> 1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as "High-
> way 55" or "Route 55"?

Most in New Jersey would refer to it as "route" however upon
checking the phone listings it will be found that they are listed as
"State Hwy 55" or "US Hwy 55"

>
> 2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to hear
> "Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."

"Take"

>
> Please refrain from comments about the real Route or Highway 55 in your
> location or miles vs. kilometers :).
>
> Matt

Rich Dean
Butler NJ which includes two miles of State Hwy 23

Pete from Boston

unread,
Jul 27, 2001, 1:49:02 AM7/27/01
to
Adam Froehlig <fro...@mississippi.net> wrote in message news:<3B609F2B...@mississippi.net>...

> > 1. When I lived in NJ, everything was "route." Never would you hear
> > "Interstate 80," "US 1," or anything. It's just "route 17, route 3,
> > route 80, route 1." The only variation was a total absence of the
> > modifier, which was common too; e.g. "287" or "46." "Highway"? Never
> > used as a modifier in my experience.
>
> Still pretty much the case. For the fiancee, and most others I know in
> Jersey, its "route xx" (pronounced "root"), including the Interstates
> (Route 78, Route 287, Route 80, etc etc). Occasionally, Interstates did
> not have a modifier ("95", "195"). The NJ Turnpike is "the Turnpike",
> while the GSP is "the Parkway".

True. Even in the vicinity of the Palisades Interstate Parkway (the
"interstate" is appropriate, by the way -- the road predates the
system), that road is "the Palisades," since everyone knows "the
Parkway" is the GSP. Signs leading to it often just say "Parkway
South."

Never in my life have I heard any utterance of "Bergen-Passaic
Expressway" for 80, though I always knew the name from the Hagstrom
maps (then again, Hagstrom had rail yards which were ripped up 20
years prior), nor would you consider telling someone to go north of
Montvale on the "Parkway Extension." You'll hear 495 called "the
Bergen Viaduct" on news reports, but I think a lot of people never
stop to think that it's not simply the tail end of route 3 (and, as I
think about it, shouldn't it be?).

I don't know what people call the GSP spur to Paterson.

One oddity you do hear, though, is Communipaw Ave. in Kearny referred
to as "Truck One Nine" (it's the land alternative to the multiplexed
US 1 and 9, which cross the meadowlands on the Pulaski Skyway). It's
signed as such, but I don't know anyplace else where such a
designation is in common parlance. For that matter, the whole road
from the GW down to Woodbridge or wherever it splits is often just
called "One Nine."

Poshua

unread,
Jul 27, 2001, 3:01:21 AM7/27/01
to

Ron Newman wrote in message <9jptv...@drn.newsguy.com>...

>On Thu, 26 Jul 2001 13:56:34 -0400, in article
><9jpm73$2ndc$1...@node21.cwnet.roc.gblx.net>, "N.W.Perry" stated...
>>
>>> Always "Route 28", never "Highway 28", in Massachusetts.
>>
>>Also, "Route 95", never "I-95".
>
>I've heard people say "I-95", meaning the parts north and south of
>Route 128, not the part shared with it.
>
>On the other hand, nobody says "I-90". It's "the Pike" or "the Mass Pike"
>or "the Turnpike".

I hear "I-95" or "Route 95" or "128" to refer to Boston's fair beltway
(although nobody ever dares call it "The Beltway" or even refer to it as
one). "128" is certainly most common, but I hear "Route 95" much more often
than never. The state has gradually been taking down the 128 signs; now
it's easy to forget that you're also on 128 while you're on 95. Therefore,
when giving directions to someone from out of town, it's always best to call
it by its interstate number.

The pike is also sometimes called "I-90" although "the pike" is much more
common.

The most awkward road name in Massachusetts goes to I-93 between the Charles
River and Medford: "The Upper and Lower Decks."

-Josh

Benjamin Lukoff

unread,
Jul 27, 2001, 4:16:48 AM7/27/01
to
mwalcoff wrote:

> 1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as "High-
> way 55" or "Route 55"?

In Washington state, non-interstates are "highway" unless they have
three digits, in which case they are usually referred to by the number
alone. So we have "Highway 3", "Highway 20", but usually "167", "520", etc.

> 2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to hear
> "Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."

Probably the first.

J.P. and Earl

unread,
Jul 27, 2001, 7:29:32 AM7/27/01
to

"N.W.Perry" <per...@frontiernet.net> wrote in message
news:9jpmpj$1umg$1...@node21.cwnet.roc.gblx.net...
> For New York:
> 2) The definite article is *never* used for numbered routes.


Except in Buffalo, where you'll hear the interstates referred to with "the".
"The 290", "The 90" and "the 190". I think it's akin to "The Scajaquada" (I
hope I spelled that right!)

J.P. Wing

DJL2474

unread,
Jul 27, 2001, 7:35:47 AM7/27/01
to
Michael G. Koerner wrote:
<< It is EXCLUSIVELY 'highway' here in Wisconsin. Nearly every numbered or
lettered road is 'Highway (xx)'. Interestingly, though, locals here in the
Appleton area ALWAYS refer to the WI 441 freeway as simply "Four-forty-one".
The word 'highway' is often omitted in casual conversation for other highways,
too, but it is not prevalent. Interstates are spoken as "Eye-(xx)".
Milwaukeeans will often omit the 'Eye' part, though.>>

Similar in central Wisconsin, too. Most common is omitting the 'highway' all
together. You drive on '29', '39', '10', '13', '54', 'N', etc. Rarely does
one even use the word 'highway' in front of it. When talking about using I-39
(US-51), it is often commonly referred to as just "gettin' on the highway" or
"gettin' on the beltline' by most locals".

emeier

unread,
Jul 27, 2001, 8:05:27 AM7/27/01
to
I've never heard anyone refer to I-94/80
> > as the Borman. Its simply "80/94". However the Indiana Toll Road is
> > always the "Toll Road" and not "90" or "80/90"

> > I guess you don't listen to traffic reports or talk to people up in "Da
> > Region." Many times does Shadow Traffic and Metro Traffic refer to 80/94
> as
> > "The Borman." I grew up a stones throw away from the road and many people
> I
> > associated with when I grew up referred to the road as "The Borman."
> Irony
> > was that I had a friend who's father was named Frank Borman and my friend
> > always boasted that the highway was named after his father.

> Agreed...

> M

I've never lived in Lake County, so I'll have to defer to ya'll. My
experince came from dating a girl from there. Maybe its a Northern
Lake Co/Southern Lake Co thing. Cause she was from down south and I
never heard anyone there utter the term "Borman"

emeier

Ron Newman

unread,
Jul 27, 2001, 7:45:51 AM7/27/01
to
In article <5l887.101$n_3.3...@typhoon.ne.mediaone.net>, "Poshua"
<pos...@mediaone.net> wrote:

> The most awkward road name in Massachusetts goes to I-93 between the Charles
> River and Medford: "The Upper and Lower Decks."

I've never heard that, at least not all together as one name.
Traffic reports often refer to "The Lower Deck", which is southbound I-93,
but only rarely to "The Upper Deck", since this part of northbound I-93
usually has no traffic problems.

Emi Melissa Briet

unread,
Jul 27, 2001, 9:20:28 AM7/27/01
to
Poshua wrote:

> (although nobody ever dares call it "The Beltway" or even refer to it as
> one).

I've been calling it "The Boston Beltway" since about the early 1990s,
actually *heh* And yes, I lived in that area back then.

> "128" is certainly most common, but I hear "Route 95" much more often
> than never. The state has gradually been taking down the 128 signs; now
> it's easy to forget that you're also on 128 while you're on 95. Therefore,
> when giving directions to someone from out of town, it's always best to call
> it by its interstate number.

Yes, the BGS's *only* sign I-95, with directional MA-128 signs posted to
the side of the road. MassHighway has been trying to remove the MA-128
designation for a while...maybe they're waiting for more people to get
used to calling it "Route 95".

After living on Cape Cod for 25 years, Minnesota for 3 years, and having
a lot of friends on California, I tend to switch between the terms
"Route", "Highway", and for freeways, "the". *heh* "Stillwater? Take
I-94 East to the 35W North and exit at Highway 36. Stay on Route 36
until you get there..." Drives some people nuts ;)

Once I was watching a traffic report in El Toro, CA in Spanish, and the
reporter kept referring to the freeways as "El Cinco", "El
Quatro-oh-Cinco", etc. *heh* =)

--Emi

--
Emi Briet -- DecisionOne's kawaii techie-chan! ^.^
Keep your ear to the radio, and keep hot water with you at all times!

RanmaCode[1.3]: r+(+) R!++ AG HS X++ SP Du+ m+ mu++ E:#antijen H F:+
a28 d+ s-: NA x Sch:CS,BA L:E ma+ M w++ N,IE

President - Campaign for DDR (Dance Dance Revolution) in Minneapolis
Captain - "Frozen Dancers", a Minnesota DDR team ^.^v

Seaver & Swoboda's Mets Slide Story

unread,
Jul 27, 2001, 9:26:55 AM7/27/01
to
<<1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as
"High- way 55" or "Route 55"? >>

The Elmira media tends to refer to state roads (both NY and PA,
including PA reference routes) as "State Route xxx." Execptions being
I-86 (referred to as such) and NY 17 (referred to as "Route 17").

In conversation, omitting "route" is not uncommon.

Mark Sinsabaugh
http://baugh17.www1.50megs.com

Richard Stinneford

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Jul 27, 2001, 10:36:59 AM7/27/01
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"N.W.Perry" wrote:

snipped

2) The definite article is *never* used for numbered routes.

But just to your west, as you probably know, it is almost always used when referring to divided, limited-access highways in the Buffalo area, whether interstate or state route number.  Thus, it is "the 190", "the 290", "the 990", "the 33", and "the 400".  Jason is right about the Thruway, it is almost always "The Thruway", very, very rarely any of "90", "I-90" or "the 90".  For some reason, usage is mixed when referring to US 219.  I have heard both "219" and "the 219".

In Cheektowaga, substitute the definite article "da" (pronounced *duh*) for "the".  Thus, "the 33" becomes "da 33", usually followed by the modifier "der" (pronounced, *dare*).  "You take da 33, der from the airport to downtown . . ."

NJroadfan

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Jul 27, 2001, 10:46:50 AM7/27/01
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"Pete from Boston" <mass...@my-deja.com> wrote in message
news:b282e3e6.01072...@posting.google.com...

> Adam Froehlig <fro...@mississippi.net> wrote in message
news:<3B609F2B...@mississippi.net>...
> > > 1. When I lived in NJ, everything was "route." Never would you hear
> > > "Interstate 80," "US 1," or anything. It's just "route 17, route 3,
> > > route 80, route 1." The only variation was a total absence of the
> > > modifier, which was common too; e.g. "287" or "46." "Highway"? Never
> > > used as a modifier in my experience.
> >
> > Still pretty much the case. For the fiancee, and most others I know in
> > Jersey, its "route xx" (pronounced "root"), including the Interstates
> > (Route 78, Route 287, Route 80, etc etc). Occasionally, Interstates did
> > not have a modifier ("95", "195"). The NJ Turnpike is "the Turnpike",
> > while the GSP is "the Parkway".

"Root" is generally the case for NJ, but there are a few exceptions.
"Rowte" is used on radio ads for Autoland on US 22 and also by a few
residents. I know a few people who still say "rowte," and they have lived
in NJ for many years

> True. Even in the vicinity of the Palisades Interstate Parkway (the
> "interstate" is appropriate, by the way -- the road predates the
> system), that road is "the Palisades," since everyone knows "the
> Parkway" is the GSP. Signs leading to it often just say "Parkway
> South."

GSP and NJTP often appear in advertisements from businesses along those
corridors. "Parkway Entrance" appears on official signs on entrance ramps.

> Never in my life have I heard any utterance of "Bergen-Passaic
> Expressway" for 80, though I always knew the name from the Hagstrom
> maps (then again, Hagstrom had rail yards which were ripped up 20
> years prior), nor would you consider telling someone to go north of
> Montvale on the "Parkway Extension." You'll hear 495 called "the
> Bergen Viaduct" on news reports, but I think a lot of people never
> stop to think that it's not simply the tail end of route 3 (and, as I
> think about it, shouldn't it be?).
>
> I don't know what people call the GSP spur to Paterson.

How about Route 19? I'm not sure, as that road is almost always absent from
traffic reports.

Charles w. Finley

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Jul 27, 2001, 11:36:50 AM7/27/01
to
djg...@yahoo.com (Dan Garnell) wrote in
<78b54403.01072...@posting.google.com>:

>mwal...@onecom.com (mwalcoff) wrote in message
>news:<820fd90d.01072...@posting.google.com>...
>> I was kind of surprised to find that Ontario uses the terminology
>> "High- way 401" rather than "Route 401," especially since using the
>> word "route" would give them one less thing to have to translate into
>> French.
>>
>> Anyway, here's a quick, two-question survey:
>>

>> 1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as
>> "High- way 55" or "Route 55"?
>>

>> 2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to
>> hear "Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."
>>
>

>There is only one terminology that I am familar with in Michigan:
>"M-55."
>No Rte-zz, no Hwy-zz; just M-zz.
>
>
of course, in Detroit, the state route/US Route/Interstate is often used
interchangibly with the street name the route is signed. for example M-39
is refered to as the Southfield, M-3 is Gratiot, M-102 is 8 Mile Rd, M-10
is the Lodge, M-53 is Van Dyke, M-97 is Groesbeck, M-153 is Ford Rd, M-85
if Fort St. M-1 is Woodward, M-59 is either Hall Rd or 20 mile rd, M-8 is
the Davison, US-12 is Michigan, US-24 is Telegraph, I-696 is 11 Mile rd.
interstate are reffered by the route numbers (I-75,I-94,I-96, I-275, I-696,
I-375)

if some asked where a costco is, i would reply at Gratiot and 11 Mile, not
at M-3 and I-696. if someone asked where the Detroit Zoo is, i would say
Woodward and 10 mile, not M-1 and I-696.

Frank Curcio

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Jul 27, 2001, 1:25:23 PM7/27/01
to
In article <89aa12f5.01072...@posting.google.com>,
richard...@my-deja.com (Rich Dean) writes:

>
> Most in New Jersey would refer to it as "route" however upon
>checking the phone listings it will be found that they are listed as
>"State Hwy 55" or "US Hwy 55"
>

This is consistant. Route xx or just xx in speech. But if an address, it's
Highway XX, or State Highway xx, I've even seen US Highway 1. This especially
when addressing envelopes.

However, I have sent mail to an office building whose address is State Highway
31 North and addressed it Route 31 North and the mail got there no problem.

Another minor exception, decommissioned state/US roads that have become town
streets - Old Highway 22, (former US 22) or Old Highway 28 (former NJ 28) are
referred to in speech with Highway before the number.

Regards,
Frank

Frank Curcio

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Jul 27, 2001, 1:25:22 PM7/27/01
to
In article <b282e3e6.01072...@posting.google.com>,

mass...@my-deja.com (Pete from Boston) writes:

>Never in my life have I heard any utterance of "Bergen-Passaic
>Expressway" for 80, though I always knew the name from the Hagstrom
>maps (then again, Hagstrom had rail yards which were ripped up 20
>years prior),

You're not the only one who hasn't heard that term in speech.


>One oddity you do hear, though, is Communipaw Ave. in Kearny referred
>to as "Truck One Nine" (it's the land alternative to the multiplexed
>US 1 and 9, which cross the meadowlands on the Pulaski Skyway). It's
>signed as such, but I don't know anyplace else where such a
>designation is in common parlance. For that matter, the whole road
>from the GW down to Woodbridge or wherever it splits is often just
>called "One Nine."
>

Actually its called won-nen-nine or Route Won-nen-nine or Truck Won-nen-nine

And Route Won-nen-nine ends at the Skyway and is picked-up again on the udder
side of the Skyway. Nobody takes Won-nen-nine over the Meadows, they take the
Skyway.

Regards,
Frank


N.W.Perry

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Jul 27, 2001, 1:33:41 PM7/27/01
to
Oh, right! Somebody told me she'd heard that, but I didn't believe, thinking
that somebody from California must be involved.

"J.P. and Earl" <jpn...@earthlink.net> wrote in message
news:wgc87.400$0w3....@newsread2.prod.itd.earthlink.net...

N.W.Perry

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Jul 27, 2001, 1:39:07 PM7/27/01
to

"Ron Newman" <rne...@thecia.net> wrote in message
news:9jptv...@drn.newsguy.com...

> I'd never try to follow 28 (a good example) in the Boston metro area,
> but signing is pretty good once you get outside cities. You could easily
> drive Route 2 from Alewife in Cambridge to the NY state line without
> making any wrong turns.

Route 2, yes, but try 1A through Ipswich or, God forbid, 3A through Lowell.


Pete from Boston

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Jul 27, 2001, 4:16:59 PM7/27/01
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"NJroadfan" <nj...@njroads.cjjunkb.net> wrote in message news:<u9f87.12237$UH6.1...@news02.optonline.net>...

> "Pete from Boston" <mass...@my-deja.com> wrote in message
> news:b282e3e6.01072...@posting.google.com...
> > I don't know what people call the GSP spur to Paterson.
>
> How about Route 19? I'm not sure, as that road is almost always absent from
> traffic reports.

Is that all Route 19? I guess maybe you're right. I never payed it
much atention -- I thought it was essentially an overzealous exit
ramp.

I think it's absent from traffic reports because (in my experience)
traffic is largely absent from the road. I've never seen many cars
there.

Jason L. Bennett

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Jul 27, 2001, 5:48:17 PM7/27/01
to
Richard Stinneford wrote:
>
> "N.W.Perry" wrote:
>
> snipped
>
> > 2) The definite article is *never* used for numbered routes.
>
> But just to your west, as you probably know, it is almost always
> used when referring to divided, limited-access highways in the
> Buffalo area, whether interstate or state route number. Thus, it is
> "the 190", "the 290", "the 990", "the 33", and "the 400". Jason is
> right about the Thruway, it is almost always "The Thruway", very,
> very rarely any of "90", "I-90" or "the 90". For some reason, usage
> is mixed when referring to US 219. I have heard both "219" and "the
> 219".

What, no "Southern Expressway"?

On a related note, irregardless of its number, it's the "Southern Tier
Expressway". Sometimes, some of the "old timers" will still call it
the "Route 17 Expressway".



> In Cheektowaga, substitute the definite article "da" (pronounced
> *duh*) for "the". Thus, "the 33" becomes "da 33", usually followed
> by the modifier "der" (pronounced, *dare*). "You take da 33, der
> from the airport to downtown . . ."

Just only in Cheektowaga?

Jason L. Bennett
Oriskany, NY
--
When tempted to fight fire with fire, remember that the Fire
Department usually uses water.

Jason L. Bennett

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Jul 27, 2001, 5:59:55 PM7/27/01
to

Buffaloians believe it sounds more cool than "The 198". Plus, ever
listen to someone ever try to say Scajaquada? Almost as fun as
Yahnundasis.

Robert Cote

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Jul 27, 2001, 6:22:36 PM7/27/01
to
In article <3B61E44B...@adelphia.net>,

"Jason L. Bennett" <benn...@adelphia.net> wrote:

> "J.P. and Earl" wrote:
> >
> > "N.W.Perry" <per...@frontiernet.net> wrote in message
> > news:9jpmpj$1umg$1...@node21.cwnet.roc.gblx.net...
> > > For New York:
> > > 2) The definite article is *never* used for numbered routes.
> >
> > Except in Buffalo, where you'll hear the interstates referred to with "the".
> > "The 290", "The 90" and "the 190". I think it's akin to "The Scajaquada" (I
> > hope I spelled that right!)
>

> Buffaloians ...

Buffellators? That would make the act of city boosting; buffellatio.

C. P. Zilliacus

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Jul 28, 2001, 8:34:42 AM7/28/01
to

>Anyway, here's a quick, two-question survey:
>

>1) In your state, province or whatever, do they refer to roads as
>"Highway 55" or "Route 55"?

Actually, for official purposes, "Maryland," or "U.S." or "I" are preferred in
my state. Virginia seems to like "Route" when possible. "Highway" is
not used.

>2) In your state, province or whatever, would you be more likely to hear
>"Take 55 for 10 miles" or "Take the 55 for 10 miles."

"The" is never used in that context.

Richard Stinneford

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Jul 28, 2001, 9:09:20 AM7/28/01
to

"Jason L. Bennett" wrote:

> What, no "Southern Expressway"?

I know you jest, but no. Interesting, because one occasionly hears "the
Youngman" for I-290, "the Niagara" or "the Niagara Thruway" for I-190,
"the Kensington" for NY 33 (despite the fact that the official name for
this highway has been "The Martin Luther King Expressway" for many years
now), and "the Aurora Expressway" for NY 400. But I don't think I have
ever heard anyone casually refer to US 219 as "the Southern Expressway."

> On a related note, irregardless of its number, it's the "Southern Tier
> Expressway". Sometimes, some of the "old timers" will still call it
> the "Route 17 Expressway".

What, not the "Hinsdale Highway"?

> > In Cheektowaga, substitute the definite article "da" (pronounced
> > *duh*) for "the". Thus, "the 33" becomes "da 33", usually followed
> > by the modifier "der" (pronounced, *dare*). "You take da 33, der
> > from the airport to downtown . . ."
>
> Just only in Cheektowaga?

Can't say for sure.

Kevin Olmstead

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Jul 28, 2001, 12:44:43 PM7/28/01