Reversible Lanes: where do they still exist?

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Trent

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Mar 25, 2003, 12:44:01 PM3/25/03
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The notorious reversible lane has struck fear in motorists for several
decades, but they are not completely gone. The MUTCD still provides a
section about signing such situations.

GA still has two reversible lane areas that I know of. The second
mentioned here is notorious for horrendous traffic. They are:

1) US 41/Northside Drive in Buckhead between south of West Paces Ferry
Road and I-75 to the south. This is a three lane with the middle lane
reversible.

2) US 78 through Downtown Snellville east of the Stone Mountain
Freeway. This road features twin reversibles instead of a single
lane.

An old one that once existed was a famous deathtrap: GA 5/Canton
Highway in Northern Cobb County. This was a three lane road with
center reversible that was removed when I-575 opened in 1985. From
what I hear, there used to be bumper stickers that read "Pray for me,
I drive Highway 5".

I always loved to drive the reversible lanes. They are quite
fascinating with their lit X's and arrows and strange signage and
markings (GA used to have an overhead white on red rectangular sign
that just read "NO"). Since it is not something you normally see
anymore, they are almost worthy of photos and maybe I should get some.
Anyone know of any other places that still have reversible lanes?

Pete Rose Was Cool

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Mar 25, 2003, 12:59:56 PM3/25/03
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On 25 Mar 2003 09:44:01 -0800, tleg...@hotmail.com (Trent) said:

>The notorious reversible lane has struck fear in motorists for several
>decades, but they are not completely gone.

Wow! A thread about roads!

I believe the Clay Wade Bailey Bridge at Cincinnati has a middle lane
like this. I think Columbia Parkway also had one, but I hardly ever go
up there anymore.

--

I think. Therefore, I am not a conservative!
------ http://www.todayslastword.org -------

Jeff Kitsko

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Mar 25, 2003, 1:18:56 PM3/25/03
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"Trent" <tleg...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:4a2530f7.03032...@posting.google.com...

>
> Anyone know of any other places that still have reversible lanes?

Pittsburgh has them on General Robinson Street, 6th Street, 6th Street
/Roberto Clemente Bridge, Liberty Bridge, and not to mention the I-279 and
I-579 reversible HOV lanes.

--
Jeff Kitsko
Pennsylvania Highways: http://www.pahighways.com/
Ohio Highways: http://www.ohhighways.com/


John David Galt

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Mar 25, 2003, 1:43:57 PM3/25/03
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Trent wrote:
> Anyone know of any other places that still have reversible lanes?

Maybe we should make a list and put it in the FAQ. I doubt if there are more
than a hundred in America, or much more than that in the world.

Northern California has them in four places. The Golden Gate Bridge and the
Caldecott Tunnel are the only freeways that have them (two lanes each);
Lafayette St. in Santa Clara has a reversible center lane; and the park area
in the Marin Headlands (built as an army base I forget the name of) has a
reversible one-lane tunnel under US 101, controlled by a signal on a very
long cycle. (There used to be a fifth -- the main entrance road to Mare
Island navy shipyard in Vallejo -- but it stopped being reversible when the
base closed.)

John

Scott O. Kuznicki

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Mar 25, 2003, 1:53:14 PM3/25/03
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Trent <tleg...@hotmail.com> posted:

> The notorious reversible lane has struck fear in motorists for several
> decades, but they are not completely gone. The MUTCD still provides a
> section about signing such situations.

Fall Creek Parkway in Indianapolis: Five lanes with the middle reversible

If I'm not mistaken, Minneapolis, MN has some reversible lanes on downtown
streets that are used primarily during sporting events at the Metrodome.
I've never been there during rush hour, so maybe they're used then, too. As
far as freeways go, there's the I-394 reversibles.

Other than the Kennedy Expressway, Chicago has no major segments of arterial
or freeway reversible lanes. There is a reversible intersection area at the
end of Lake Shore Drive at Hollywood Av/5700N. I'm not completely sure of
the various configurations, but I know that one NB lane becomes a SB lane in
the morning to allow an additional left-turn lane to clear on SB Sheridan Rd
and more efficiently process "through" traffic. They have changeable
regulatory signs overhead (turn only arrows become combination turn-through
arrows or something like that), but I don't think there's any kind of red
x's or other more conventional reversible-lane appurtanences.
http://terraserver.microsoft.com/image.aspx?t=1&s=10&x=2229&y=23241&z=16&w=2

--
Scott Kuznicki
Dedicated Highway Enthusiast
Civil (Traffic) Engineer


Allen Seth Dunn

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Mar 25, 2003, 1:58:44 PM3/25/03
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They exist in many places in the DC/Baltimore Area. Chain Bridge, connecting
VA 123 in Arlington to Northwest Washington, DC is the worst being that it is
adjusted for commuter traffic, yet has the strangest, most confusing schedule
for when the center lane is to be used by what direction of traffic. Also,
there are the Shirley Highway: I-95/395 reversible HOV Lanes in the center of
the road in Northern Virginia. In Maryland, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge just
east of Annapolis has reversible lanes since it has two spans, with the main
westbound span being 3 lanes and the main Eastbound span being 2 lanes and
often times the middle lane (of all 5 lanes on the two bridge spans) is used
for Eastbound traffic when it's expected to be heavy (not a fun experience
seeing as I've done that myself). Also, the two sets of Baltimore Harbor
Tunnels have all lanes reversible. The Fort McHenry Tunnel (I-95) has four
2-lane sections and can be moved as needed. Also, the Habor Tunnel Throughway
(I-895) tunnel has two 2-lane sections which can also be adjusted as needed.
That being the case, those are the only ones I can think of off-hand.

Justin

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Mar 25, 2003, 2:30:47 PM3/25/03
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<snipped>

> I always loved to drive the reversible lanes. They are quite
> fascinating with their lit X's and arrows and strange signage and
> markings (GA used to have an overhead white on red rectangular sign
> that just read "NO"). Since it is not something you normally see
> anymore, they are almost worthy of photos and maybe I should get some.
> Anyone know of any other places that still have reversible lanes?

I-90 in Seattle reversible HOV lanes, I-30 in Dallas reversible HOV lanes...
Golden Gate Bridge, Chesapeake Bay Bridge (althought it's been a while for
me...)
Gaston Avenue in Dallas, Ross Avenue here as well...
and I think California is building some on I-15

Justin


George Grapman

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Mar 25, 2003, 2:08:55 PM3/25/03
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Golden Gate Bridge does it every day.

--
To reply via e-mail please delete "NOSPAM" from address.


Brian D

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Mar 25, 2003, 1:49:13 PM3/25/03
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Chicago: Kennedy Expy from Ohio Street to the Edens Expy (that's I-90/I-94
from a mile or so north of I-290 to where the two interstates split east of
O'Hare Airport)

St. Louis: I-70, I believe from Broadway (Downtown area) to Grand. They're
still closed, but they're installing a new gate system for them now that the
bridge rehibilitation project on I-70 in STL County and STL City is just
about finished. The reversables were used at points as crossover lanes
during the project.

I typed that... and realized those aren't the reversable lanes you are
talking about.... but.. one case that does fit is Fall Creek Parkway (old
SR-37) northeast of downtown in Indianapolis.


"Trent" <tleg...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
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MrSparkle

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Mar 25, 2003, 2:58:07 PM3/25/03
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"Pete Rose Was Cool" <ban...@todayslastword.org> wrote in message
news:3e8097cd.1305417@localhost...

> On 25 Mar 2003 09:44:01 -0800, tleg...@hotmail.com (Trent) said:
>
> >The notorious reversible lane has struck fear in motorists for several
> >decades, but they are not completely gone.
>
> Wow! A thread about roads!
>
> I believe the Clay Wade Bailey Bridge at Cincinnati has a middle lane
> like this. I think Columbia Parkway also had one, but I hardly ever go
> up there anymore.
>
Columbia Parkway's has been entirely removed, althought some striping and
overhead lane signals still exist
between Delta and Stanley, they are never used, and its really functions a
paved median

Clay Wade's looks like ther are in use:
http://www.state-ends.com/ohends/us42/us42-s2.jpg
See comment below, they might be turned off

Cincinnati's Queen City Avenue's are slated to be removed when a 4-6 lane
bypass is built to the south of the existing roadway
(which will be returned as a quiet, neighborhood street but too late to help
save the neighborhood). It was stated that these will
be the last ones in the City to be removed

George Grapman

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Mar 25, 2003, 3:03:28 PM3/25/03
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Lincoln Tunnel.

Froggie

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Mar 25, 2003, 3:53:29 PM3/25/03
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> If I'm not mistaken, Minneapolis, MN has some reversible lanes on downtown
> streets that are used primarily during sporting events at the Metrodome.
> I've never been there during rush hour, so maybe they're used then, too. As
> far as freeways go, there's the I-394 reversibles.

No reversibles during rush hour in downtown Minneapolis, and if there are any
during Metrodome events, this is the first I've heard of them. AFAIK, the only
reversible lanes in Minnesota are the I-394 Reversible HOV lanes.

In Memphis, Union Ave (US 64/70/72/79) has a stretch of reversible lanes near
downtown and for a ways east of I-240.

Here in Hampton Roads, there's the Reversible lanes on I-64 in Norfolk between
I-564 and I-264. There's also a "reversible gate" setup at two of the gates at
Norfolk Naval base, where all the lanes are open to inbound traffic during the
morning rush hour. Occasionally, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel will have
2-lane, 2-way traffic on one of the carriageways (outside the tunnels) during
maintenance or special events, although this does not happen very often.

Froggie | Virginia Beach, VA | http://www.ajfroggie.com/roads/

Eric Maddy

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Mar 25, 2003, 4:25:03 PM3/25/03
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Los Angeles, 4th Street over the Los Angeles River (just east of downtown
proper) has a center lane which is WB only during morning rush hour, EB only
during afternoon rush hour,and is a 2-way left-turn lane during non-rush
periods.

Not sure if this fits the definition exactly....

Michael Moroney

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Mar 25, 2003, 5:02:35 PM3/25/03
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The Washington DC area used to have (probably still does) tons of them.
Many DC city streets are one-way certain hours, 2-way other times. (These
are marked with a normal one-way sign, except yellow and black, with the
one-way hours posted. I am trying to remember how the pavement markings
were, I think it was a dashed double yellow line.

Also I-15 in San Diego has a 2 lane reversible HOV lane from the
downtown area to near the Ted Williams Parkway/CA 56.

-Mike

Trent

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Mar 25, 2003, 5:40:17 PM3/25/03
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The most fascinating reversibles I have ever seen and by far my
favorite:
The Cooper River Bridge in Charleston. That was about 10 years ago I
saw them last, but they may still be there. Think about it, a whole
bridge that reverses direction-the older Cooper River Bridge does
this.

Amos

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Mar 25, 2003, 6:10:21 PM3/25/03
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Carnegie Avenue in Cleveland, OH has one. I haven't driven that road in
quite a while, so I don't remember the exact configuration, but i do know
that it has one.

"Trent" <tleg...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
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George Grapman

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Mar 25, 2003, 6:33:07 PM3/25/03
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Along with the Golden Gate Bridge the approaches in SF (Doyle Drive)
and Marin County(U.S. 101) reverse.

stéphane dumas

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Mar 25, 2003, 6:55:09 PM3/25/03
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"Pete Rose Was Cool" <ban...@todayslastword.org> a écrit dans le message
news: 3e8097cd.1305417@localhost...

> On 25 Mar 2003 09:44:01 -0800, tleg...@hotmail.com (Trent) said:
>
> >The notorious reversible lane has struck fear in motorists for several
> >decades, but they are not completely gone.
>
> Wow! A thread about roads!
>
> I believe the Clay Wade Bailey Bridge at Cincinnati has a middle lane
> like this. I think Columbia Parkway also had one, but I hardly ever go
> up there anymore.
>
there one reversible lane on the Jacques-Cartier Bridge in Montreal and an
other one on the Quebec bridge near Quebec City

> --
>
> I think. Therefore, I am not a conservative!
> ------ http://www.todayslastword.org -------

Stéphane Dumas


Kevin Lagasse

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Mar 25, 2003, 6:55:58 PM3/25/03
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tleg...@hotmail.com (Trent) wrote in message news:<4a2530f7.03032...@posting.google.com>...

I-93/US 1/MA 3 has one in South Boston heading towards Braintree and
the South Shore.

You can also include the Tappan Zee Bridge in New York State and the
Ben Franklin Bridge crossing from Philadelphia into Camden, NJ.

Rte66man

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Mar 25, 2003, 7:17:34 PM3/25/03
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"Trent" <tleg...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:4a2530f7.03032...@posting.google.com...
> The notorious reversible lane has struck fear in motorists for several
> decades, but they are not completely gone. The MUTCD still provides a
> section about signing such situations.
>
> I always loved to drive the reversible lanes. They are quite
> fascinating with their lit X's and arrows and strange signage and
> markings (GA used to have an overhead white on red rectangular sign
> that just read "NO"). Since it is not something you normally see
> anymore, they are almost worthy of photos and maybe I should get some.
> Anyone know of any other places that still have reversible lanes?

The HOV lanes on the Southwest Freeway (US59), Katy (I-10), and I-45 north
are all reversible. I would guess that almost all of the ones in Houston are
reversible, but will wait for PLH to confirm or deny it ;-)

Rte66man


Jim Mearkle

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Mar 25, 2003, 7:19:06 PM3/25/03
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George Grapman <sfge...@NOSPAMpacbell.net> wrote in message news:<3E80A95D...@NOSPAMpacbell.net>...

> Golden Gate Bridge does it every day.

As does the Mid Hudson Bridge

Marc Fannin

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Mar 25, 2003, 7:51:43 PM3/25/03
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John David Galt <j...@diogenes.sacramento.ca.us> wrote...

> Trent wrote:
>
> > Anyone know of any other places that still have reversible lanes?
>
> Maybe we should make a list and put it in the FAQ. I doubt if there are more
> than a hundred in America, or much more than that in the world.

100 items, minimum, in an FAQ question? That wouldn't be excessive?
I feel I'm pushing it with 60 for the interchange name list....

________________________________________________________________________
Marc Fannin|musx...@kent.edu or @hotmail.com| http://www.roadfan.com/

Mike Roberson

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Mar 25, 2003, 7:52:52 PM3/25/03
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> > Anyone know of any other places that still have reversible lanes?

Here are some still active in my vicinity:

1. Canal Rd NW. Washington DC
2. US 50-301 Chesapeake Bay Bridge
3. MD 97 Georgia Ave. Silver Spring
4. I-95/395 HOV lanes, Northern Virginia
5. I-64 HOV lanes Norfolk, VA

and in a related notion...
6. Suicide middle lane, US 1 between NC Line and US 58. 3 lanes, both
dotted yellow lines. I think these may have been common in Virginia
at one time, as the 1944 Official Map shows a picture of US 11 with
the suicide setup.

Two reversible situations that have gone away:
1. McMillan Ave (S-10-44) between US 52/78 Rivers Ave and the
Charleston Naval Base (setup went away in the '70s)
2. The "old" Cooper River Bridge, US 17 SB, was reversed to US 17 NB
to provide additional flow from Charleston to Mt. Pleasant. This
happened during the summer of (I believe) 1994 or 1995. It was an
experimental trial that came and went.

Mike
Virginia Highways Page
www.angelfire.com/va3/mapmikey/index

Oscar Voss

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Mar 25, 2003, 7:57:52 PM3/25/03
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For more in Virginia, just in Arlington, there's reversible lanes on
Columbia Pike (VA 244) approaching the Pentagon from the east, and also
on one block of Washington Blvd. between Wilson Blvd. and 13th Street.
(Why they don't just widen that stretch from three lanes to four is a
mystery -- on one side of the street is a snazzy new HQ for a local taxi
company, but the other side has an old pet shop building that would not
be missed.) And the Roosevelt Bridge carrying I-66 into D.C. has a
movable barrier so that the bridge's seven lanes can be changed from
four inbound, three outbound for the morning rush, to four outbound,
three inbound for the evening rush.

--
Oscar Voss - ov...@erols.com - Arlington, Virginia

my Hot Springs and Highways pages: http://users.erols.com/ovoss/

Michael G. Koerner

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Mar 25, 2003, 8:10:34 PM3/25/03
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The adapted railroad tunnel in the Whittier, AK area has one
'reversable' lane.

--
___________________________________________ ____ _______________
Regards, | |\ ____
| | | | |\
Michael G. Koerner May they | | | | | | rise again!
Appleton, Wisconsin USA | | | | | |
___________________________________________ | | | | | | _______________

Michael G. Koerner

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Mar 25, 2003, 8:12:43 PM3/25/03
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Ahh, the 'Zipper' lanes. There is one of these on I-H1 east from I-H2
in the Honolulu, HI area, too.

The Plague

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Mar 25, 2003, 8:15:23 PM3/25/03
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There are a few places in NC. In raleigh Edwards Mill Road by RBC Center
has them. In Charlotte, Tyvola Road which services the charlotte coliseum
has them, The plaza, which is a city street has them in certain areas, and
the median of US 29 from I-485 to a little ways past lowes motor speedway
was turned into reversible lanes for the unbelievable race traffic that they
have there especially for speedweeks in may.


James Dunlop

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Mar 25, 2003, 8:26:02 PM3/25/03
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>Subject: Re: Reversible Lanes: where do they still exist?
>From: "The Plague" Ragein...@earthlink.net
>Date: 3/25/2003 8:15 PM Eastern Standard Time
>Message-id: <La7ga.19771$jA2.1...@newsread2.prod.itd.earthlink.net>

The Edwards Mill Road system will probably be removed if/when a large
development gets built across from the ESA.

There's also High Point Road in Greensboro, heading to/from I-40 and the
Greensboro Colliseum.

Pete Jenior

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Mar 25, 2003, 8:46:20 PM3/25/03
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"MrSparkle" <troymc...@aol.com> wrote in message
news:3e80b57f$0$97522$a046...@nnrp.fuse.net...

>
> "Pete Rose Was Cool" <ban...@todayslastword.org> wrote in message
> news:3e8097cd.1305417@localhost...
> > On 25 Mar 2003 09:44:01 -0800, tleg...@hotmail.com (Trent) said:
> >
> > >The notorious reversible lane has struck fear in motorists for several
> > >decades, but they are not completely gone.
> >
> > Wow! A thread about roads!
> >
> > I believe the Clay Wade Bailey Bridge at Cincinnati has a middle lane
> > like this. I think Columbia Parkway also had one, but I hardly ever go
> > up there anymore.
> >
> Columbia Parkway's has been entirely removed, althought some striping and
> overhead lane signals still exist
> between Delta and Stanley, they are never used, and its really functions a
> paved median

Must have been a long time ago. I've lived here since 1990 and I think they
were gone before then.

There are still some on Beechmont Ave. (OH 125) as it climbs the hill up to
Mt. Washington from the Little Miami River valley. There is currently
construction on that road and i think they are being removed.

-Pete

Pete Jenior

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Mar 25, 2003, 8:52:23 PM3/25/03
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"Trent" <tleg...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:4a2530f7.03032...@posting.google.com...
> The notorious reversible lane has struck fear in motorists for several
> decades, but they are not completely gone. The MUTCD still provides a
> section about signing such situations.
>
> GA still has two reversible lane areas that I know of. The second
> mentioned here is notorious for horrendous traffic. They are:
>
> 1) US 41/Northside Drive in Buckhead between south of West Paces Ferry
> Road and I-75 to the south. This is a three lane with the middle lane
> reversible.
>
> 2) US 78 through Downtown Snellville east of the Stone Mountain
> Freeway. This road features twin reversibles instead of a single
> lane.

I lived near this road in the 1980s when they were added. The twin setup
works with one of the lanes being an actual lane and the other being a
center turn lane.

Shortly after the lanes were added there were some accidents where people
did not stop for red lights because they were confusing the red of the
stoplight with the red x's for the lanes they were not supposed to use. To
help this problem some sort of blue flash was added to red traffic light
signals.

I read in the Atlanta newspaper last fall the GDOT has plans to get rid of
the reversible lanes on US 78.

It's also kind of sad to me how this area of US 78 has gone downhill and
everyone is simply moving 5-10 miles further out and abandoing one store to
build a new one. Classic out-of-control Georgia development.
--
-Pete Jenior - Cincinnati, Ohio
-Civil Engineering Major
Georgia Tech (next to a different part of US 78)


Tim Habeck

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Mar 25, 2003, 9:01:13 PM3/25/03
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> Anyone know of any other places that still have reversible lanes?

US 6 through a large portion of Omaha. It starts near downtown and
goes west all the way to an intersection right before Crossroads Mall.

Oscar Voss

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Mar 25, 2003, 9:27:42 PM3/25/03
to
Michael G. Koerner wrote:

> The adapted railroad tunnel in the Whittier, AK area has one
> 'reversable' lane.

Not only is it a one-lane reversible tunnel, but it is shared with rail
traffic. Trains have alloted time slots to go through the tunnel, mixed
in with the slots for westbound and eastbound traffic.

BTW, the tunnel is really cool -- and IMO the only reason you'd ever
want to visit Whittier (other than to catch a ferry across Prince
William Sound), which is an otherwise undistinguished industrial port.

Oscar Voss

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Mar 25, 2003, 9:41:09 PM3/25/03
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Michael G. Koerner wrote:

> Ahh, the 'Zipper' lanes. There is one of these on I-H1 east from I-H2
> in the Honolulu, HI area, too.

Yes. It's eastbound morning-rush only, and starts about a mile west of
the H-2 junction. Hawaii DOT and Honolulu County are considering
setting up a similar westbound afternoon-rush lane, as part of a Bus
Rapid Transit project. However, the left exit from eastbound H-1 to
H-2, and the left entrance from H-2 to eastbound H-1, complicates a
westbound zipper lane.

BTW, I have lots of photos of the H-1 zipper lanes, on a *draft* new
photos page for Interstate H-1,
http://www.hawaiihighways.com/photos-Interstate-H1.htm
(The page itself is nearly final, but a lot of the links won't work
until the rest of the new photo collection is complete. I'm just
mentioning the new draft page, rather than the existing Hawaii Highways
photo page covering H-1, because the new page has many more zipper lane
photos.)

Stanley Cline

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Mar 25, 2003, 11:11:05 PM3/25/03
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On 25 Mar 2003 09:44:01 -0800, tleg...@hotmail.com (Trent) wrote:

> Anyone know of any other places that still have reversible lanes?

Barton Avenue in Chattanooga.

-SC
--
Stanley Cline -- sc1 at roamer1 dot org -- http://www.roamer1.org/
...
"Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today. There might
be a law against it by that time." -/usr/games/fortune

Bill Grunnah

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Mar 26, 2003, 1:55:25 AM3/26/03
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"Justin" <jco...@removethisairmail.net> wrote in message
news:5B865676250B0915.CACBC64E...@lp.airnews.net...
>
> <snipped>

> > I always loved to drive the reversible lanes. They are quite
> > fascinating with their lit X's and arrows and strange signage and
> > markings (GA used to have an overhead white on red rectangular sign
> > that just read "NO"). Since it is not something you normally see
> > anymore, they are almost worthy of photos and maybe I should get some.
> > Anyone know of any other places that still have reversible lanes?
>
> I-90 in Seattle reversible HOV lanes, I-30 in Dallas reversible HOV
lanes...
> Golden Gate Bridge, Chesapeake Bay Bridge (althought it's been a while for
> me...)
> Gaston Avenue in Dallas, Ross Avenue here as well...
> and I think California is building some on I-15
>
> Justin

Gaston and Ross are no longer reversible, though Live Oak still is. In
addition to the zipper on I-30, portions of the HOV lane on I-35E/US-67 are
also reversible using a barricade system.

In Arlington, The Road To Six Flags (yes, that's the name of the road) is
reversible on the west side of the Ballpark.

- B


jmn3

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Mar 26, 2003, 5:44:29 AM3/26/03
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Peace Bridge from Buffalo to Ft. Erie, Ontario has three lanes and the
middle one gets changed depending on traffic flow.


Ted Gahimer

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Mar 26, 2003, 9:24:01 AM3/26/03
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On Tue, 25 Mar 2003 18:53:14 GMT, "Scott O. Kuznicki"
<scottk...@hotmail.com> wrote:

>Trent <tleg...@hotmail.com> posted:


>> The notorious reversible lane has struck fear in motorists for several
>> decades, but they are not completely gone. The MUTCD still provides a
>> section about signing such situations.
>

>Fall Creek Parkway in Indianapolis: Five lanes with the middle reversible

Is it just the middle lane that's reversible? I seem to remember
there being signals marking all five lanes. I haven't been on it in a
couple of weeks (and I'm usually paying more attention to the traffic,
anyway). There's also Meridian Street in Indianapolis, between
Raymond Street and Pleasant Run Parkway. It's three lanes, with the
middle reversible, and it's controlled by signs(!) that says something
to the effect of (going northbound) Use this lane from 6am to 9am,
M-F, with the reverse on the soutbound side of the signs. I only used
to use it coming home...I never trusted people heading to work in the
morning.

Ted


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Trent

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Mar 26, 2003, 12:27:58 PM3/26/03
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"Pete Jenior" <gtg...@prism.gatech.eduFILTER> wrote in message news:<b5r14p$sme$1...@news-int.gatech.edu>...

Snellville is positively the biggest hellhole I have ever seen. I was
there on a Saturday night once and it was bumper-to-bumper just as bad
as a Friday afternoon. It took me about an hour to go two miles.
Nevertheless, I was infatuated with those reversible lanes prior to
the log jam. I hope to get back there to get a picture in addition to
the highway ends shots of GA 264 (the source of the backup on US 78).

Referring to the old shopping centers, I think it is this simple:
people want to shop at something that looks appealing, looks clean and
they believe will have a better selection. The businesses along US 78
are not only hard to get to, but have been around since I was a little
kid. Most of these developments from the '70's and '80's look pretty
dated, dirty and small these days, but it is such a shame they can't
just tear them down when they start getting run down (and start over
if the market's there). I have seen them do this recently when an old
A&P/Big Star was gutted and replaced with a Publix in a shopping
center built in the very early 1990's. More recently, I seem to
notice these blights quite a bit around Atlanta and across the state.
It is very depressing and made worse by the exodus of Kmart, the
Swifty Serve chain, several grocery store chains and at least two
fast-food chains. To everyone from outside of GA, it looks as if we
are certainly past our peak in Atlanta.

Iron Pirate

unread,
Mar 26, 2003, 3:26:35 PM3/26/03
to
On 25 Mar 2003 09:44:01 -0800, tleg...@hotmail.com (Trent) wrote:

>The notorious reversible lane has struck fear in motorists for several
>decades, but they are not completely gone. The MUTCD still provides a
>section about signing such situations.

>I always loved to drive the reversible lanes. They are quite


>fascinating with their lit X's and arrows and strange signage and
>markings (GA used to have an overhead white on red rectangular sign
>that just read "NO"). Since it is not something you normally see
>anymore, they are almost worthy of photos and maybe I should get some.
> Anyone know of any other places that still have reversible lanes?

Lions Gate Bridge between Vancouver, BC, and North Vancouver (part of
Provincial Highway 99) is a 3-lane with the centre reversible.

George Massey Tunnel between Richmond, BC and Delta, BC (also part of
Highway 99) is a 2-tube tunnel with 2 lanes in each tube. In AM rush
it is 3 Northbound and 1 Southbound, PM rush is the reverse. The
tunnel was built in 1958, and it is a real thrill taking a 102" wide
bus through there when you get a guy in a motorhome hugging the centre
lane going the other way.

Oitt River Bridge (Higway 7) also has reversible lanes, but I cant
remember the setup.

Bruce

MrSparkle

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Mar 26, 2003, 5:14:48 PM3/26/03
to

"Pete Jenior" <gtg...@prism.gatech.eduFILTER> wrote in message
news:b5r0pe$sc6$1...@news-int.gatech.edu...

They are....proposed roadway will be 5 lanes, 2 each way and the centerlane
reserved for left turns
>
> -Pete
>
>
>


Scott M. Kozel

unread,
Mar 26, 2003, 5:28:46 PM3/26/03
to
Allen Seth Dunn <i_6...@msn.com> wrote:
>
> They exist in many places in the DC/Baltimore Area. Chain Bridge, connecting
> VA 123 in Arlington to Northwest Washington, DC is the worst being that it is
> adjusted for commuter traffic, yet has the strangest, most confusing schedule
> for when the center lane is to be used by what direction of traffic. Also,
> there are the Shirley Highway: I-95/395 reversible HOV Lanes in the center of
> the road in Northern Virginia. In Maryland, the Chesapeake Bay Bridge just
> east of Annapolis has reversible lanes since it has two spans, with the main
> westbound span being 3 lanes and the main Eastbound span being 2 lanes and
> often times the middle lane (of all 5 lanes on the two bridge spans) is used
> for Eastbound traffic when it's expected to be heavy (not a fun experience
> seeing as I've done that myself). Also, the two sets of Baltimore Harbor
> Tunnels have all lanes reversible. The Fort McHenry Tunnel (I-95) has four
> 2-lane sections and can be moved as needed. Also, the Habor Tunnel Throughway
> (I-895) tunnel has two 2-lane sections which can also be adjusted as needed.
> That being the case, those are the only ones I can think of off-hand.

The Baltimore Harbor tunnel tubes only reverse lanes during exceptional
situations, though, such as in the case of major maintenance requiring
lane closures, or in the case of accidents that block lanes.

The other facilities named above have reversible lanes that are
regularly reversed for peak period conditions.

--
Scott M. Kozel Highway and Transportation History Websites
Virginia/Maryland/Washington, D.C. http://www.roadstothefuture.com
Philadelphia and Delaware Valley http://www.pennways.com

Scott M. Kozel

unread,
Mar 26, 2003, 5:30:47 PM3/26/03
to
mrobe...@hotmail.com (Mike Roberson) wrote:
>
> Here are some still active in my vicinity:
>
> 1. Canal Rd NW. Washington DC
> 2. US 50-301 Chesapeake Bay Bridge
> 3. MD 97 Georgia Ave. Silver Spring
> 4. I-95/395 HOV lanes, Northern Virginia
> 5. I-64 HOV lanes Norfolk, VA
>
> and in a related notion...
> 6. Suicide middle lane, US 1 between NC Line and US 58. 3 lanes, both
> dotted yellow lines. I think these may have been common in Virginia
> at one time, as the 1944 Official Map shows a picture of US 11 with
> the suicide setup.

Last time I was through there, the middle lane was painted off as a
continuous left-turn lane.

William D. Kotchkoski

unread,
Mar 26, 2003, 6:08:19 PM3/26/03
to
The configuration for Carnegie Avenue in Cleveland is all 6 lanes going
westbound during the morning rush hour, and all 6 going eastbound during the
evening rush hour. This configuration affects Carnegie from its eastern
terminus to Prospect Avenue. I forget the exact times.

Cedar (going up Cedar Hill just east of Carnegie) is 4 lanes west / 2 east in
the morning and 2 lanes west / 4 lanes east in the evening.

E. 222 St. in Euclid, OH used to have a reversible center lane, but now it's
just a standard center left-turn lane. I don't know when it was changed, but
it was somewhat recently.

Amos wrote:

> Carnegie Avenue in Cleveland, OH has one. I haven't driven that road in
> quite a while, so I don't remember the exact configuration, but i do know
> that it has one.


>
> "Trent" <tleg...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:4a2530f7.03032...@posting.google.com...

> > The notorious reversible lane has struck fear in motorists for several

> > decades, but they are not completely gone. The MUTCD still provides a
> > section about signing such situations.
> >

> > GA still has two reversible lane areas that I know of. The second
> > mentioned here is notorious for horrendous traffic. They are:
> >
> > 1) US 41/Northside Drive in Buckhead between south of West Paces Ferry
> > Road and I-75 to the south. This is a three lane with the middle lane
> > reversible.
> >
> > 2) US 78 through Downtown Snellville east of the Stone Mountain
> > Freeway. This road features twin reversibles instead of a single
> > lane.
> >

> > An old one that once existed was a famous deathtrap: GA 5/Canton
> > Highway in Northern Cobb County. This was a three lane road with
> > center reversible that was removed when I-575 opened in 1985. From
> > what I hear, there used to be bumper stickers that read "Pray for me,
> > I drive Highway 5".
> >

Compañero Señor Yamamoto de Hollywood

unread,
Mar 26, 2003, 8:18:50 PM3/26/03
to
The Mid-Hudson Bridge(US 44-NY 55) has a reversing center lane, open only
during peak traffic hours(6-9am eastbound; 3-6pm westbound). The
Newburg-Beacon bridge(IH 84) has signals that would allow reverse traffic to
flow on either span, though the crossovers are blocked by guardrailing. The
Tappan Zee Bridge(IH 87/IH 287/Thruway) has a "zipper" barrier.

--
Comrade Mister Yamamoto of Hollywood
http://mr_yamamoto.50megs.com
http://flag.blackened.net
Send me all the folding green money in your mommy's purse or daddy's wallet.
Those pretty plastic cards will do nicely, too.
"Iron Pirate" <IronP...@shaw.ca> wrote in message
news:51348vglhqo3upe15...@4ax.com...


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Eric Lin

unread,
Mar 27, 2003, 3:33:48 AM3/27/03
to
On Tue, 25 Mar 2003, Justin wrote:

> I-90 in Seattle reversible HOV lanes, I-30 in Dallas reversible HOV lanes...
> Golden Gate Bridge, Chesapeake Bay Bridge (althought it's been a while for
> me...)
> Gaston Avenue in Dallas, Ross Avenue here as well...
> and I think California is building some on I-15

I-5 also has reversible lanes from just south of Seneca Avenue in downtown
Seattle to about a 1/2 mile north of NE 103rd Street in Seattle's
Northgate district.

The number of lanes on the I-5 reversible roadway in Seattle ranges
from one to four lanes. The s/b configuration is quite interesting in
downtown Seattle. At the Mercer Street exit, the reversible roadway has 4
lanes. Only the #2 lane eventually merges into the s/b I-5 mainline. The
#1 lane becomes a HOV-2 lane just south of the Mercer Street exit &
eventually exits to Columbia & Cherry Streets. (This exit is restricted to
HOV traffic only.) The #3 lane exits to Pike Street. (This exit is also
restricted to HOV traffic only.) Finally, the #4 lane becomes a mixed-flow
exit to Stewart Street.

-----------------
Eric Lin
ek...@cs.ucla.edu

John R Cambron

unread,
Mar 27, 2003, 10:35:24 AM3/27/03
to

Let us not forget the short section of MD US-29 in Silver Spring
Maryland between Spring Street and Sligo Creek Parkway. Normal
configuration is 6 lanes, 3 each way. 4 southbound 2 northbound
AM peek, 2 southbound 4 northbound PM peek

--
======================================================================
Ever wanted one of these John R Cambron
http://205.130.220.18/~cambronj/wmata/ or North Beach MD USA
http://www.chesapeake.net/~cambronj/wmata/ camb...@chesapeake.net
======================================================================

Kevin Flynn

unread,
Mar 27, 2003, 4:52:01 PM3/27/03
to
There are at least two prominent reversible lanes on Interstate 70 in
the Colorado mountains.

The Eisenhower-Johnson Tunnel(s) under the Continental Divide has two
bores of two lanes each. In summer weekend "rush hour" when tourists
are flocking up (Fridays) or back (Sundays) tunnel crews take one lane
WB or EB from the appropriate bore, divide oncoming traffic and have
three lanes go in one direction and only one lane in the other.

The same is done at the beautiful Hanging Lake Tunnel in Glenwood
Canyon farther west of the Eisenhower on I-70.

The other one I drive regularly when I return to my hometown in Easton
PA is the three-lane Northampton Street Free Bridge across the
Delaware to Phillipsburg NJ. Typically, the center lane of the span is
divided halfway across the river, so that when you enter the bridge
from either side on the right-most lane, the center lane will have
oncoming traffic headed off the bridge. About halfway across the
overhead signal allows you to move left and use it to exit the bridge.
It can be changed depending on circumstances. On the PA side it is a
left-turn lane onto Larry Holmes Drive (formerly Riverside Drive/Front
Street). On the Jersey side, both lanes come out into Union Square.

Andrew Tompkins

unread,
Mar 27, 2003, 6:05:39 PM3/27/03
to
"Marc Fannin" <musx...@kent.edu> wrote in message
news:cc3aa42a.03032...@posting.google.com...
> John David Galt <j...@diogenes.sacramento.ca.us> wrote...

>
> > Trent wrote:
> >
> > > Anyone know of any other places that still have reversible lanes?
> >
> > Maybe we should make a list and put it in the FAQ. I doubt if there are more
> > than a hundred in America, or much more than that in the world.
>
> 100 items, minimum, in an FAQ question? That wouldn't be excessive?
> I feel I'm pushing it with 60 for the interchange name list....
>
> ________________________________________________________________________
> Marc Fannin|musx...@kent.edu or @hotmail.com| http://www.roadfan.com/
>

Put the content in someone's web pages (any volunteers?) and put a link in the faq.
Same thing with the named interchanges and anything else that is getting to big to
have directly in the faq.

--Andy
--------------------------------------------------
Andrew G. Tompkins
Software Engineer
Beaverton, OR
http://home.teleport.com/~andytom/Highways
--------------------------------------------------------
Roads Scholaring.
It's not about life and death.
It's more important than that.
--------------------------------------------------------


mj...@duke.edu

unread,
Mar 27, 2003, 8:00:59 PM3/27/03
to

The bad thing about the Washington DC reversible lanes is that they took
the cheap way out...no lane control signals! They just have signs....

The signs on Chain Bridge for example show three arrows....1 black outline
arrow pointing down, and 2 black arrows (filled in in black) pointing up,
with morning rush hour times on it...and underneath, two black not-filled
in arrows pointing down, one filled in one pointing up, and "all other
times" underneath it. Better have a good clock.....

There are occasionally "use 2 lanes" and "use 1 lane" signs...

Marc Fannin

unread,
Mar 28, 2003, 1:35:01 PM3/28/03
to
"Andrew Tompkins" <and...@teleport.com> wrote...

> "Marc Fannin" <musx...@kent.edu> wrote...

> > John David Galt <j...@diogenes.sacramento.ca.us> wrote...
> >
> > > Trent wrote:
> > >
> > > > Anyone know of any other places that still have reversible lanes?
> > >
> > > Maybe we should make a list and put it in the FAQ. I doubt if there are
> > > more than a hundred in America, or much more than that in the world.
> >
> > 100 items, minimum, in an FAQ question? That wouldn't be excessive?
> > I feel I'm pushing it with 60 for the interchange name list....
>

> Put the content in someone's web pages (any volunteers?) and put a link in the > faq.
> Same thing with the named interchanges and anything else that is getting to
> big to have directly in the faq.

Problem is, there are usually no volunteers. I think what I'll do is
simply mention that these are still located in most major cities of
the U.S. and elsewhere, and put a link to this thread at Google
Groups. If someone DOES make a page, I'll link to that (assuming that
whoever makes it will use this thread as one of the sets of data).

David J. Greenberger

unread,
Mar 28, 2003, 2:54:07 PM3/28/03
to
Here are the ones I know of in NYC.

The Lincoln Tunnel (three 2-lane tubes) can be reconfigured in many
different ways. In the morning rush, I think it has three inbound lanes
for general traffic, one inbound bus lane (which carries an astounding
number of passengers in a constant stream of buses), and two outbound
lanes.

The Holland Tunnel (two 2-lane tubes) isn't normally reconfigured except
as tunnel maintenance requires, when either tube can be closed.

The Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel (two 2-lane tubes) reverses one of its
outbound lanes in the morning rush. The lane reversal extends down the
Gowanus Expressway past the Belt Parkway and also a bit out on the
Prospect Expressway. (The exit ramp from the SB/WB Gowanus to the
Prospect is "hijacked" for this operation; outbound traffic going to the
Prospect has to follow a confusing and crowded street detour.) The
extra lane is reserved for HOV-3 and buses with E-ZPass. (The rest of
the tunnel is HOV-2 in the morning rush, as are all vehicular crossings
into lower Manhattan.) The expressway lanes are physically divided with
a "zipper" barrier but the tunnel has only pylons (if even that).

I don't think any reversals take place nowadays on the Manhattan Bridge
(two 2-lane upper roadways, one 3-lane lower roadway, and two 2-track
subway lines), since I believe one of the upper roadways (along with the
two tracks beneath it) is closed. But when all three roadways are open,
the lower roadway usually carries (IIRC) outbound traffic, except in the
morning rush, when it's reversed.

IINM, the Williamsburg Bridge (four 2-lane roadways, side-by-side, with
one 2-track subway line in the middle) reverses one roadway in each
rush. The roadways are also often reversed for road work, since a
long-term bridge reconstruction project is nearing completion.

The Queens-Midtown Tunnel (two 2-lane tubes) reverses one of its
outbound lanes in the morning rush. The lane reversal extends a mile or
two along the Long Island Expressway, where it's divided by paint. I
think this lane is restricted to buses and perhaps HOV-2.

The Queensboro Bridge (two 2-lane lower roadways, one 1-lane lower outer
roadway, and two 2-lane upper roadways) reverses one of its upper
roadways for inbound HOV-2. Since the lower outer roadway reopened to
full-time outbound traffic a few years ago, there is no longer an
afternoon rush reversal (although signs are still posted over the
inbound lanes facing outbound traffic); when there was one, it wasn't
restricted to HOV. I have a vague recollection of a reversed bus lane
on 2nd Avenue near the bridge, but it hasn't been there for many years.
--
David J. Greenberger
New York, NY

Larry

unread,
Mar 28, 2003, 3:53:02 PM3/28/03
to
tleg...@hotmail.com (Trent) wrote in message news:<4a2530f7.03032...@posting.google.com>...

<snip>

> Anyone know of any other places that still have reversible lanes?

US-12 (Michigan Ave) through the "western downtown" area of Dearborn,
MI, had a reversible lane for twelve (?) years, 1986-1998 or so.
During low-traffic periods, it was a standard five-lane road (two each
direction with a center left-turn lane), but between 6am-9am, the
center lane was directed eastbound and left turns were prohibited, and
between 3-6pm, they turned the center lane westbound and again
prohibited the left turns. (Not that the prohibition stopped people
from sitting there at the major intersections with their left-hand
blinkers waiting to turn, though.)

Bill Mitchell

unread,
Mar 28, 2003, 6:32:05 PM3/28/03
to
tleg...@hotmail.com (Trent) wrote in message
> I always loved to drive the reversible lanes. They are quite
> fascinating with their lit X's and arrows and strange signage and
> markings (GA used to have an overhead white on red rectangular sign
> that just read "NO"). Since it is not something you normally see
> anymore, they are almost worthy of photos and maybe I should get some.
> Anyone know of any other places that still have reversible lanes?

Newark, NJ

Broad Street has reversable middle lanes. Raymond Blvd., west of Broad
Street, is one way eastbound in the morning rush, one way westbound in
the afternoon, two way other times.

Allston Parking Refugee

unread,
Mar 28, 2003, 7:15:18 PM3/28/03
to
"David J. Greenberger" <dav...@email.com> wrote:
> The Queens-Midtown Tunnel (two 2-lane tubes) reverses one of its
> outbound lanes in the morning rush. The lane reversal extends a mile or
> two along the Long Island Expressway, where it's divided by paint. I
> think this lane is restricted to buses and perhaps HOV-2.

According to posted signs, the LIE bus lane is officially open only to
buses with E-ZPass, and NYC medallion taxis with passengers. I've
seen livery cars with "FHV Lane Permit" stickers on them, so they may
be allowed to use it as well.

-Apr

"Headlights on, no passing, obey posted speed limit"

HomerSimpson650

unread,
Mar 28, 2003, 11:46:49 PM3/28/03
to
Did anybody forget to mention the I-5 and I-90 reversable lanes in the Seattle
metro???

Paul S. Wolf

unread,
Mar 29, 2003, 6:51:01 PM3/29/03
to
"William D. Kotchkoski" wrote:

> Amos wrote:
>
> > Carnegie Avenue in Cleveland, OH has one. I haven't driven that road in
> > quite a while, so I don't remember the exact configuration, but i do
> > know that it has one.
>

> The configuration for Carnegie Avenue in Cleveland is all 6 lanes going
> westbound during the morning rush hour, and all 6 going eastbound during
> the evening rush hour. This configuration affects Carnegie from its
> eastern terminus to Prospect Avenue. I forget the exact times.
>
> Cedar (going up Cedar Hill just east of Carnegie) is 4 lanes west / 2
> east in the morning and 2 lanes west / 4 lanes east in the evening.

Close, but incorrect.

Morning rush is 4 WB and 2 EB from the top of Cedar Hill to Prospect Road
and 3/3 from there to East 30th Street

Evening Rush is 4 EB and 2 WB from East 30th Street to Prospect Road, then
6 EB from there to MLK, and 4 EB 2 WB from there to the top of Cedar Hill

Off peak is 3/3 from East 30th to the top of Cedar Hill

(Prospect Road connects Carnegie to Prospect Avenue, just West of East 55th
Street.)

AM Peak is 7-9:30. PM Peak is 4-6:30 (There are 15 minute clearance
periods on either end of each peak when the reversible lanes are closed to
both directions.)

> E. 222 St. in Euclid, OH used to have a reversible center lane, but now
> it's just a standard center left-turn lane. I don't know when it was
> changed, but it was somewhat recently.

--
Paul S. Wolf, P.E. mailto:paul....@alum.wpi.edu
Traff-Pro Consultants, Inc. Wickliffe, OH
Member, Institute of Transportation Engineers

Allston Parking Refugee

unread,
Mar 31, 2003, 3:47:10 PM3/31/03
to

Well, I was right for a period starting about 30 years ago and ending
yesterday, since today the LIE Midtown Tunnel Approach bus lane was
opened to HOV-3 private cars. They installed a zipper wall for this
purpose. See http://www.ny1.com/Boroughs/queens.html .

I've only been on the LIE during the morning rush once or twice, and
it was quite some time ago. Did the bus lane have lots of spare
capacity before this change? There aren't nearly as many commuter
buses crossing the East River as there are coming from New Jersey,
since the areas east of Manhattan have much better rail coverage than
those west, but this change is surprising nonetheless. Last I heard
they were thinking of restricting the BQE HOV lane to buses only,
since too many cars were using it, and now they do the opposite on the
LIE.

-Apr

David J. Greenberger

unread,
Mar 31, 2003, 6:18:23 PM3/31/03
to

Yes, that is as I remember it.

However, as of today, the lane is now open to HOV-3, and there is a
physical barrier. Read the NYCDOT announcement:
http://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/html/travroad/trafalrt.html#longisland

Tzadik Vanderhoof

unread,
Mar 31, 2003, 11:32:40 PM3/31/03
to
There is (or was) a *horrendously* designed and *treacherous* part of
Md. Route 2 south of Baltimore where a regular lane turns into a
reversible lane without warning right after a traffic light. I very
nearly got into head-on collision going northbound there about 2 years
ago.

Tzadik Vanderhoof

unread,
Mar 31, 2003, 11:35:07 PM3/31/03
to
The Delaware Memorial Bridge over the mouth of the Delaware River
between N.J. and Delaware has reversible lanes.

Steve

unread,
Mar 31, 2003, 11:47:08 PM3/31/03
to
Tzadik Vanderhoof wrote:
>
> The Delaware Memorial Bridge over the mouth of the Delaware River
> between N.J. and Delaware has reversible lanes.

How does this work? there are two separate bridges, one for each
direction. Does SB traffic use part of the NB bridge on Fridays?

Robert Cruickshank

unread,
Apr 1, 2003, 12:35:40 AM4/1/03
to