Wheel Arrangements

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shay...@freeway.net

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Jan 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/17/98
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The Locomotive Name and wheel arrangement list has been greatly expanded due to
the suggestions of several persons. If you can add any further information to
the list below I would appreciate hearing from you. Thanks.

Adriatic - 2-6-4 wheel arrangement. None in North America.
Allegheny - 2-6-6-6 wheel arrangement. Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad.
American - 4-4-0 wheel arrangement.
Angus - 0-8-8-0 wheel arrangement.
Articulated - A locomotive with more than one set of cylinders and drivers.
Usually front set of drivers swivel for better curve handling.
Atlantic - 4-4-2 wheel arrangement.
Baltic - 4-4-2 wheel arrangement. Chicago Milwaukee St Paul and Pacific.
Baltimore and Ohio - 4-4-4-4 wheel arrangement. Baltimore and Ohio.
Berkshire - 2-8-4 wheel arrangement.
Beyer-Garret - 2-8-2+2-8-2 wheel arrangement.
Bicycle - 4-2-2 wheel arrangement.
Big Boy - 4-8-8-4 wheel arrangement. Union Pacific Railroad.
Blue Ridge - 2-6-6-6 wheel arrangement. Virginian Railroad.
Cab Forward - 4-6-6-2 wheel arrangement. Southern Pacific Railroad.
Cab Forward - 4-8-8-2 wheel arrangement. Southern Pacific Railroad.
Central - 2-10-2 wheel arrangement. Illinois Central Railroad.
Challenger - 4-6-6-4 wheel arrangement. Union Pacific Railroad.
Chautauqua - 4-4-2 wheel arrangement. Brooks Locomotive Works.
Chesapeake - 2-8-8-2 wheel arrangement. Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad.
Colorado - 2-10-4 wheel arrangement. Chicago Burlington and Quincy.
Columbian - 2-4-2 wheel arrangement.
Compound - An articulated locomotive with larger low pressure cylinder that
reuse the steam from the high pressure cylinders.
Confederation - 4-8-4 wheel arrangement. Canadian National Railway.
Consolidation - 2-8-0 wheel arrangement.
Crampton - 6-2-0 wheel arrangement. Camden and Amboy Railroad.
Decapod - 2-10-0 wheel arrangement.
Decapod - 2-10-2 wheel arrangement. Southern Pacific Railroad.
Dixie - 4-8-4 wheel arrangement. Nashville Chattanooga and St Louis (and other
southern railroads).
Double Ender - 4-4-6 wheel arrangement.
Duplex - 4-4-4-4 wheel arrangement. Pennsylvania Railroad.
Duplex Drive - 4-6-4-4 wheel arrangement. Pennsylvania Railroad.
Duplex Drive - 4-4-6-4 wheel arrangement. Pennsylvania Railroad.
Eight Wheeler - 4-4-0 wheel arrangement.
Eight-coupled - 0-8-0 wheel arrangement.
Fairlie - A double boilered locomotive with a central cab and drivers under each
boiler.
Forney - 0-4-4T wheel arrangement. Sandy River and Rangeley Lakes. The
trailing truck swivels under the tender portion.
Four-coupled - 0-4-0 wheel arrangement.
Geared - A locomotive with shafts and gears to transmit the power to the wheels.
I.E.; Shay, Heisler, Climax, and Dunkirk.
Generals - 4-8-4 wheel arrangement. Richmond Fredericksburg and Potomac.
Golden State - 4-8-4 wheel arrangement. Southern Pacific Railroad.
Governors - 4-8-4 wheel arrangement. Richmond Fredericksburg and Potomac.
Greenbriar - 4-8-4 wheel arrangement. Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad.
Hudson - 4-6-4 wheel arrangement.
Jawn Henry - C+C+C+C wheel arrangement. Norfolk and Western Railroad. Steam
turbine electric.
Jervis - 4-2-0 wheel arrangement. Mohawk and Hudson Railroad.
Jubilee - 4-4-4 wheel arrangement. Canadian Pacific Railway.
Kanawha - 2-8-4 wheel arrangement. Chesapeake and Ohio Railroad.
Lady Baltimore - 4-4-4 wheel arrangement. Baltimore and Ohio Railroad.
Lima - 2-8-4 wheel arrangement. Boston and Maine Railroad and Illinois Central.
MacArthur - 2-8-2 wheel arrangement. World War II era.
Mallett - An articulated locomotive name referring to the designer
frenchman Mallet.
Mason Bogie - 2-6-6 wheel arrangement. Denver South Park and Pacific Railroad.
Drivers swivel under the boiler to allow for sharp curves.
Mastodon - 4-8-0 wheel arrangement. Central Pacific Railroad.
Mastodon - 4-10-0 wheel arrangement. Central Pacific Railroad.
Mikado (Mike) - 2-8-2 wheel arrangement.
Milwaukee - 4-6-4 wheel arrangement. Chicago Milwaukee St Paul and Pacific.
Mogul - 2-6-0 wheel arrangement.
Mohawk - 4-8-2 wheel arrangement. New York Central Railroad.
Montana - 4-8-4 wheel arrangement.
Mountain - 4-8-2 wheel arrangement.
New Haven - 4-8-2 wheel arrangement. New York New Haven and Hartford Railroad
(3-cylinder).
Niagara - 4-8-4 wheel arrangement. New York Central.
Northern - 4-8-4 wheel arrangement.
Overland - 4-10-2 wheel arrangement. Union Pacific Railroad.
Pacific - 4-6-2 wheel arrangement.
Pennsylvania - 6-4-4-6 wheel arrangement. Pennsylvania Railroad.
Planet - 2-2-0 wheel arrangement.
Pocono - 4-8-4 wheel arrangement. Lackawanna Railroad.
Potomac - 4-8-4 wheel arrangement. Western Maryland Railroad.
Prairie - 2-6-2 wheel arrangement.
Reading - 4-4-4 wheel arrangement. Reading Railroad.
Santa Fe - 2-10-2 wheel arrangement. Atchison Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad.
Selkirk - 2-10-4 wheel arrangement. Canadian Pacific Railway.
Shore Line - 4-6-4 wheel arrangement. New York New Haven and Hartford.
Single - 2-2-2 wheel arrangement.
Six Wheeler - 4-2-0 wheel arrangement.
Six-coupled - 0-6-0 wheel arrangement.
Slug - Motor less booster engine which takes power from the locomotive it's
attached to.
Southern Pacific - 4-10-2 wheel arrangement. Southern Pacific Railroad.
Ten Wheeler - 4-6-0 wheel arrangement.
Ten-coupled - 0-10-0 wheel arrangement.
Texas - 2-10-4 wheel arrangement. Texas and Pacific Railroad.
Triplex - 2-8-8-8-2 wheel arrangement. Erie Railroad.
Triplex - 2-8-8-8-4 wheel arrangement. Virginian Railroad.
Twelve Wheeler - 4-8-0 wheel arrangement.
Union - 0-10-2 wheel arrangement.
Union Pacific - 4-12-2 wheel arrangement. Union Pacific railroad.
Wyoming - 4-8-4 wheel arrangement. Lehigh Valley Railroad.
Yellowstone - 2-8-8-4 wheel arrangement. Northern Pacific Railroad.
6-8-6 wheel arrangement. Pennsylvania Railroad. Steam turbine
direct drive.
4-4-6-2 wheel arrangements. Atchison Topeka and Santa Fe.
4-6-4T wheel arrangement. Canadian National Railway.
0-2-2-0 wheel arrangement.
0-4-4-0 wheel arrangement.
2-6-6-2 wheel arrangement.
2-6-6-4 wheel arrangement.
Willamette
Shay
Climax
Heisler
Dunkirk
Bruce Gathman

A train starved railfan,living in a
virtual wasteland of abandoned railroads,
in the Tip of the Mitt.

Doug Smith

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Jan 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/17/98
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shay...@freeway.net wrote:
>
> The Locomotive Name and wheel arrangement list has been greatly expanded....

And Smitty replies:

Only two real bones to pick with your list:

1. 2-6-4's existed on Boston & Albany as tank engines in suburban
service.

2. On the Milwaukee Road, 4-6-4's were referred to as "Baltics", not
4-4-2's.

Oh, yeah, as for Garratt engines, what about 4-8-2+2-8-4 types, as well
as others?

roger traviss

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Jan 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/17/98
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It seems that only North Americans go for this thing about giving wheel
arrangements names. The only ones in common use in the UK were Pacific
for the 4-6-2, Prairie for the 2-6-2, Atlantic for the 4-4-2 and Baltic
for the 4-6-4. I'm sure if they were more, someone will correct me.

Now, as for naming locomotives, that definitely was a trait of the
British. At least when they dod that, they did with style. Cast brass
nameplates were the norm. While painted names weren't unknown, they
weren't common.

Cheers,

Roger Traviss
From rainy Victoria, BC Canada

joe kleifges

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Jan 17, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/17/98
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> Oh, yeah, as for Garratt engines, what about 4-8-2+2-8-4 types, as well
> as others?

i think it can be said that any # + # is called a garret, since the type
is a boiler, between two tenders, with drivers under the tenders. i don't
know of any particular names given to specific garret wheel araingments.

Scotty Hiddelston

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Jan 18, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/18/98
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joe kleifges <hardc...@netvalue.net> wrote in article
<34C19A...@netvalue.net>...

To be super picky, a few Modified Fairlies were built by the North British
Locomotive Co. and they were designated ## + ## , but they were really only
an unsuccessful attempt to get around the Beyer-Peacock patent for
Garratts. Funnily enough, they were neither Garratts nor Fairlies, but a
single frame with pivoting engines at each end.
I believe Garratts were "classed" by the wheel arrangement of one of their
engines e.g. 4-6-2 + 2-6-4 = Pacific Class Garratt, but as Roger said this
was not an important factor in British Steam.

Scotty sco...@whidbey.net

Jon Rose

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Jan 20, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/20/98
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Also: Mountain for a 4-8-2 - now Roger, before you say we never had
any over here please check out the RH&DR website at
http://i-way.co.uk/~tburgess/rhdr.rhdr/html for pics of
their septogenarians Samson and Hercules.

Mikado for a 2-8-2 ie the LNER P1 and P2 classes.

As for names - well,we used to have a wonderful tradition of naming our
top express loco's after historic or evocative subjects -
my favourites are the King Arthur class named after characters and
places from the Legend of King Arthur and the Lord Nelson class named
after famous naval commanders. Nowadays they're even namimg 0-6-0
shunters and the names are both random and banal.I'd start a Campaign
For Real Locomotive Names if I could think up a catchy acronym :-)

--
Jon Rose,
Apprentice Ale-Trailer,
Crawley, West Sussex, England
http://members.tripod.com/~jonrose/index.htm

Arved Grass

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Jan 21, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/21/98
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shay...@freeway.net wrote in message
<34c0a8a...@newsserv.freeway.net>...


>The Locomotive Name and wheel arrangement list has been greatly expanded
due to
>the suggestions of several persons. If you can add any further information
to
>the list below I would appreciate hearing from you. Thanks.


I've heard Southern Pacific employees refer to thier M- class moguls as
"Valley Mallets" since a 2-6-0 could haul as much up California's Central
Valley as a Cab Forward (also refered to as "Mallets" by SP employees,
although they weren't Mallets, but rather simple articulateds) could haul in
the mountain districts.

For the term "Valley Mallet", refer to the video "Classic Collector's Series
Volume III: The Golden Age of Southern Pacific Steam" by Video Rails. The
bit about "Mallets" refering to Cab Forwards is in several Southern Pacific
steam books - most notably the Robert Church book "Cab Forward" (now out of
print).

- Arved KF4UCQ

user id: Arved / User domain: MediaOne.net
SPAM belongs in a can, not on the internet. If you can't figure out my
return address, you're probably a SPAMbot, and I'm not interested in hearing
from you or your master anyway.

Tobias Koehler

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Jan 22, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/22/98
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On Sat, 17 Jan 1998 21:59:00 -0800, joe kleifges (hardc...@netvalue.net)
wrote in misc.transport.rail.americas:

> i think it can be said that any # + # is called a garret, since the type
> is a boiler, between two tenders, with drivers under the tenders. i don't
> know of any particular names given to specific garret wheel araingments.

I heard that (2'C1')'(1'C2')' is called Pacific-Garratts,
(2'C2')'(2'C2')' would then be a Baltic-Garratt and
(2'D1')'(1'D2')' a Mountain-Garratt.

--
tobias benjamin koehler t...@rcs.urz.tu-dresden.de
__________ ______________ ______________ _>________
,-'==H=======H||= H======== H||H============H||H=======H==`-.
`-oo--------oo-'`-oo--------oo-'`-oo--------oo-'`-oo--------oo-'

Tim O'Connor

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Jan 22, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/22/98
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Arved Grass wrote:
>
> shay...@freeway.net wrote in message
> <34c0a8a...@newsserv.freeway.net>...
> >The Locomotive Name and wheel arrangement list has been greatly expanded
> due to
> >the suggestions of several persons. If you can add any further information
> to
> >the list below I would appreciate hearing from you. Thanks.
>
> I've heard Southern Pacific employees refer to thier M- class
> moguls as "Valley Mallets" since a 2-6-0 could haul as much up
> California's Central Valley as a Cab Forward

Arved,

Yes, it was a common nickname, but no, they could not haul even
a fraction as much as an AC or other large engine. They were good
steamers and were very effective branchline and local service engines.
And on the flat they could haul plenty of freight in that service.
They were so cost effective that they weren't replaced until the
mid-1950's, long after most of the big engines had been vacated.

Too bad HO scale 2-6-0's can't haul 15 cars! I'd love to use them
on locals.

Regards,
Tim O.

John Wilson

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Jan 23, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/23/98
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shay...@freeway.net wrote:
: The Locomotive Name and wheel arrangement list has been greatly expanded due to

: the suggestions of several persons. If you can add any further information to
: the list below I would appreciate hearing from you. Thanks.

: Adriatic - 2-6-4 wheel arrangement. None in North America.

Reading had a number of 2-6-4T sidetank engines used on the
Philadelphia-Chestnut Hill commuter trains. All were junked after
the commuter network was electrified in 1931. Do these count?

73,
JohnW

Piers R Connor

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Jan 23, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/23/98
to t...@rcs.urz.tu-dresden.de

Tobias Koehler wrote:

> I heard that (2'C1')'(1'C2')' is called Pacific-Garratts,
> (2'C2')'(2'C2')' would then be a Baltic-Garratt and
> (2'D1')'(1'D2')' a Mountain-Garratt.
>

This is the "continental European" wheel notation system. Can you
explain how it works? Isn't there also a system in some countries which
would describe a Pacific 4-6-2 as a 2-3-1?

TIA

Piers, Singapore


dave pierson

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Jan 23, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/23/98
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In article <34C84CEF...@pacific.net.sg>, Piers R Connor <prco...@pacific.net.sg> writes...

>Tobias Koehler wrote:

>> I heard that (2'C1')'(1'C2')' is called Pacific-Garratts,
>> (2'C2')'(2'C2')' would then be a Baltic-Garratt and
>> (2'D1')'(1'D2')' a Mountain-Garratt.

>This is the "continental European" wheel notation system. Can you
>explain how it works?

Roughly:
It counts axles instead of wheels. (most axles have two wheels)
Letters are powered axles
Axles with an "o" are individually powered.
[The discussion above is B-G, steamers, so no "o"
Properly Used US diesels would be Bo-Bo or Co-Co.]
The punctuation defines articulation at body level, vs at
draw bar height, etc.
This system was introduced in Europe (Germany?) ca 1890. In the US its
used (usually in mutant form) for diesels and electrics, it was
developed for all forms of motive power.

>Isn't there also a system in some countries which would describe a Pacific
>4-6-2 as a 2-3-1?

Yup. predecessor to above. Counts axles instead of wheels.

See Previous Joke. 8)>>

thanks
dave pierson |the facts, as accurately as i can manage,
Digital Equipment Corporation |the opinions, my own.
334 South St |
Shrewsbury, Mass USA pie...@gone.enet.dec.com
"He has read everything, and, to his credit, written nothing." A J Raffles
"....the net of a million lies...." Anon

Jon Rose

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Jan 23, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/23/98
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Out of interest how would an American describe a diesel loco with
two four axle bogies, the outer most axle on each bogie being
non-powered - in the UK this would have 1-Co-Co-1 or one with two
3 axle bogies each with the centre axle non-powered - A1A-A1A to us?

Tobias Koehler

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Jan 23, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/23/98
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On 23 JAN 98 07:47:21, dave pierson (pie...@gone.enet.dec.com) wrote in
misc.transport.rail.americas:

> In article <34C84CEF...@pacific.net.sg>, Piers R Connor
> <prco...@pacific.net.sg> writes...

I wrote:

tbk> I heard that (2'C1')'(1'C2')' is called Pacific-Garratts,
tbk> (2'C2')'(2'C2')' would then be a Baltic-Garratt and
tbk> (2'D1')'(1'D2')' a Mountain-Garratt.

Piers R Connor <prco...@pacific.net.sg> wrote:

prc> This is the "continental European" wheel notation system.

More exactly it started out at the beginning of this century as
the common system of the VDEV, an association of the numerous
railways that existed in Germany back then. It found its way
into an UIC standard later, so it is one of the internationally
used classification systems.

dave pierson (pie...@gone.enet.dec.com) wrote:

dwp> It counts axles instead of wheels. (most axles have two wheels)

and even wheelsets without axles are counted as an axle ;) (Talgo)

> Letters are powered axles
> Axles with an "o" are individually powered.
> [The discussion above is B-G, steamers, so no "o"
> Properly Used US diesels would be Bo-Bo or Co-Co.]

Rather Bo'Bo' or Co'Co', because, see below..

> The punctuation defines articulation at body level, vs at
> draw bar height, etc.

Apostrophe [']: stands after a wheelset, or group of wheelsets,
which is not rigidly connected to the frame. (any bogie, or the
steering single axles that you will find at steam locomotives,
etc)

Brackets [()]: used if driven and non-driven axles are located
in the same bogie, e g (Ao1Ao)'(Ao1Ao)' for some diesel locomotives,
or (2'C2')'(2'C2')' for a NRZ class 15A :)

Plus [+]: used if a locomotive consists of several carbodies,
e g Bo'Bo'+Bo'Bo' for a BLS Ae 8/8.

The articulated bogies between two carbodies are not included in
the system.. Bo'Bo'Bo' can mean a locomotive with three bogies
and either articulated or rigid carbody. To clear up this
confusion, I use a double quote ["] for articulated bogies, but
this is a `private standard'. (So an Italian E656 would be B'B"B' ,
a TGV Sud-Est Bo'Bo'+Bo'2"2"2"2"2"2"2"Bo'+Bo'Bo' .)

> >Isn't there also a system in some countries which would describe a Pacific
> >4-6-2 as a 2-3-1?

France used to use this system (without dashes) for classifying
its steam locomotives, together with letters that denoted the
sub-class. For example, French Pacific classes included the
231 A, 231 B, and so on until 231 K. The locomotive number consisted
of this "class" together with a serial number (example: 231 K 22).

> Yup. predecessor to above. Counts axles instead of wheels.

More like used at the same time, but elsewhere.. I never saw it
in use outside France. The French railways (SNCF) used a
shortened version of the UIC wheel classification system in
their numbers of diesel and electric locomotives: CC 6500,
BB 15000 ... (the actual locomotive numbers were counted up
from there, e g CC 6502). They still use the same system, but
now without wheel classification.

(Actually this system is still valid, as French steam
locomotives were not renumbered as they were in both Germanies).

tobias

Doug Smith

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Jan 23, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/23/98
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Tobias Koehler wrote:
(Interesting data on European steam classification)

And Smitty (just to be contrary) wonders:

And how would y'all classify a 4-truck Shay? :)

Simon Carr

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Jan 24, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/24/98
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> And Smitty (just to be contrary) wonders:
>
> And how would y'all classify a 4-truck Shay? :)
>

0-4-4-4-4-0 or conceivably a B-B-B-B seeing as all wheels are driven from
a single power unit.

In neither case would it be a Garrett, which I've always taken to be two
power units with the firebox and boiler suspended between them. -- nor
could a Fairlie be described as a Garrett, even though these have one or
two power bogies. There's also the Mallets and someone else can re-start
the argument about compounding on them

regards
simon carr

P. Wezeman

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Jan 24, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/24/98
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On Fri, 23 Jan 1998, Doug Smith wrote:

> Tobias Koehler wrote:
> (Interesting data on European steam classification)
>

> And Smitty (just to be contrary) wonders:
>
> And how would y'all classify a 4-truck Shay? :)

I would think it would be classified B-B-B-B:four trucks, two
powered axles per truck, both axles in each truck mechanically driven
from a common shaft.
Does anyone know the wheel arrangement for that monstrous steam
turbine-electric passenger locomotive built just after World War Two
for the Chesapeake and Ohio?

Peter Wezeman, anti-social Darwinist

"Carpe Cyprinidae"

James D Thompson

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Jan 24, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/24/98
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P. Wezeman wrote:

> Does anyone know the wheel arrangement for that monstrous steam
> turbine-electric passenger locomotive built just after World War Two
> for the Chesapeake and Ohio?

Looking it up, in North American diesel/electric notation they were
2-C1+2-C1-B.

David Thompson, who wonders how the Europeans would describe Virginian's
EL-2Bs...

James D Thompson

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Jan 24, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/24/98
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Jon Rose wrote:

> Out of interest how would an American describe a diesel loco with
> two four axle bogies, the outer most axle on each bogie being
> non-powered - in the UK this would have 1-Co-Co-1 or one with two
> 3 axle bogies each with the centre axle non-powered - A1A-A1A to us?

Over here the first example would be a 1C-C1 assuming that the frame
of the locomotive wasn't articulated. As far as I know no locomotive
with that arrangement was ever used in North America, although C&O's
steam turbine did use trucks of that sort. The second example would be
A1A-A1A here as well. These were fairly common, with EMD E units and
Alco PAs being the best-known examples.

David Thompson

P. Wezeman

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Jan 25, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/25/98
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On Fri, 23 Jan 1998, Jon Rose wrote:

----snip----

> Out of interest how would an American describe a diesel loco with
> two four axle bogies, the outer most axle on each bogie being
> non-powered - in the UK this would have 1-Co-Co-1 or one with two
> 3 axle bogies each with the centre axle non-powered - A1A-A1A to us?

The second would be A1A-A1A. The first would be 1Co-Co1, the lack
of any punctuation between the "1" and the "C" denoting the fact that
the single idler and three powered axles were all mounted in a single
rigid frame. This sounds like the special locomotives built by ALCO for
use in Africa, with an extra unpowered axle added to each truck in order
to reduce the axle weight to an acceptable value. I saw some photographs
recently of American Do-Do locomotives in service in South America, which
I suspect were also built for lowered axle weight.

Mike Tisdale

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Jan 26, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/26/98
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wils...@netcom.com (John Wilson) wrote:

>shay...@freeway.net wrote:
>: The Locomotive Name and wheel arrangement list has been greatly expanded due to


>: the suggestions of several persons. If you can add any further information to
>: the list below I would appreciate hearing from you. Thanks.

>: Adriatic - 2-6-4 wheel arrangement. None in North America.

>Reading had a number of 2-6-4T sidetank engines used on the


>Philadelphia-Chestnut Hill commuter trains. All were junked after
>the commuter network was electrified in 1931. Do these count?

As no 2-6-4 tender engines were ever built in North America, I find it
interesting that Lionel built probably hundreds of thousands of them.

Of course, they also chose to model the Pennsy 6-8-6 turbine and there
was only one of those.

Mike Tisdale

Yves Dessaux

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Jan 28, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/28/98
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In article <34CAAF...@inna.net>, jay...@inna.net says...

> Over here the first example would be a 1C-C1 assuming that the frame
>of the locomotive wasn't articulated. As far as I know no locomotive
>with that arrangement was ever used in North America, although C&O's
>steam turbine did use trucks of that sort. The second example would be
>A1A-A1A here as well. These were fairly common, with EMD E units and
>Alco PAs being the best-known examples.

SNCF in France also used Diesel engine type A1A A1A. Just a word about
an interesting feature of these single-unit engines. The middle axle
(non-motive) was mounted on a special device that allows it to slide up
or down. When starting to pull heavy trains, the middle axles were moved
sligtly upwards, in order to increase the weight of the engine on the
4 motive axles (exceeding temporarily the 20 metric tons/axle limit).
When the train has reached a sufficent speed, then the middle axels were
slowly moved down to equilibrate the load on the 6 axles around 17 to
18 t/axles.

Cheers,

Yves (sorry for my technical english!)


Tobias Koehler

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Jan 28, 1998, 3:00:00 AM1/28/98
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On Sat, 24 Jan 1998 23:38:24 -0500, james fahlstedt (jfa...@netmcr.com)
wrote in misc.transport.rail.americas:

> > Does anyone know the wheel arrangement for that monstrous steam
> > turbine-electric passenger locomotive built just after World War Two
> > for the Chesapeake and Ohio?

> I can't, in a quick search, locate the exact wheel arrangement of the
> Chessie steam turbine electrics. I did find a paragraph in Stauffer's
> "C&O Power" which describes it:

> "The running gear consisted of two separate units; the front unit having
> a four-wheel leading truck and a rigid eight-wheeld power truck; the
> rear unit having a four-wheel guide truck, a rigid eight-wheeled power
> truck and a four-wheel Delta trailing truck establishing a 4-8-0-4-8-4
> wheel arrangement." "Three axles of each power truck and both axles of
> the trailing truck were powered. The two leading trucks used 36" wheels
> and the power and trailing trucks used 40" wheels."

I found it in a book by Brian Hollingsworth, called "Das Hand-
buch der Lokomotiven" in German.. it gives the wheel arrangement
of the C&O class M-1 as: 2'(1Co)2'(1Co)Bo' . Translated back
from German to English:

The driven axles of the "M-1" were not those that seemed
to be when you looked at the locomotive. Three of the
four axles of each of the large trucks and the two axles
of the rear small truck carried the eight traction
motors.

Including the six-axle tender it would be a
2'(1Co)2'(1Co)Bo'+3'3' . I'm not sure how to tell in the Whyte
system... :)

tbk


--
tobias benjamin koehler t...@rcs.urz.tu-dresden.de

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