What can you do with wheat?

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Doug Kennedy

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Nov 4, 1994, 11:26:41 PM11/4/94
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I often see different sorts of wheat, rye, and other grains for
sale in bulk. I've read these store well under nitrogen... but
what can you do with it, besides make it into flour? Wheat on
the cob? Hot buttered wheat? :) Really, anyone have any
good wheat or other grain recipes to share?

Thanks,

--

-- Doug Kennedy (N5RQI) <do...@hoek.uoknor.edu> --
-- University of Oklahoma --
-- School of Library and Information Studies --

Richard A. De Castro

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Nov 5, 1994, 11:33:18 PM11/5/94
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do...@hoek.uoknor.edu (Doug Kennedy) writes:

>I often see different sorts of wheat, rye, and other grains for
>sale in bulk. I've read these store well under nitrogen... but
>what can you do with it, besides make it into flour? Wheat on
>the cob? Hot buttered wheat? :) Really, anyone have any
>good wheat or other grain recipes to share?

>Thanks,

A very good question. Back in the 70's, there were a number of cookbooks
dealing with wheat. I'm trying to locate more of them, to include in the
booklist.

As I recall, you can make many sorts of different things with it, like
vegiburgers, cereal, breads and cakes, soup thickeners, etc. In order to
use it in all these ways, though, you need to keep the kernal whole, and
grind it (in your own wheat grinder/mill) for the end result you need.

If anyone else has a lead on wheat/sugar/milk/salt cooking (a'la the
Mormon's standby's) please let us know!


>--

>-- Doug Kennedy (N5RQI) <do...@hoek.uoknor.edu> --
>-- University of Oklahoma --
>-- School of Library and Information Studies --

--
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Mark Filteau

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Nov 6, 1994, 12:04:43 AM11/6/94
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do...@hoek.uoknor.edu (Doug Kennedy) writes:

>I often see different sorts of wheat, rye, and other grains for
>sale in bulk. I've read these store well under nitrogen... but
>what can you do with it, besides make it into flour? Wheat on
>the cob? Hot buttered wheat? :) Really, anyone have any
>good wheat or other grain recipes to share?


It is possible to plant wheat seeds, let it grow about 2-4 inches ("wheat
grass"), clip it, throw the grass in a blender, and drink the mixture. A few
vegans i know do this - can't tand the taste of it myself, although they
swear by the health effects.


>Thanks,

>--

>-- Doug Kennedy (N5RQI) <do...@hoek.uoknor.edu> --
>-- University of Oklahoma --
>-- School of Library and Information Studies --

--
Mark L. Filteau <mfil...@netcom.com>
"I think we should adjourn now ... the country is safer when
we're not in session."
-Sen. Charles Grassley (R-IA), 7-Oct-1994

21012d

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Nov 6, 1994, 5:04:49 PM11/6/94
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Wheat flour can be the basis for macaronni products, cereals
, gluten (wash out soluable carbohydrate, have a protein rich
material) and can be backed into pretzels, torteas, dumplings
...
Wheat can also be cooked un or partly ground as bulgar,
mush.

A major issue, which I am not comfortable with my current
solutions is that you need some kind of mill and it actually
takes a fair amount of energy to grind and process.
What I have, more dominated by convenience is an
electric powered kitchen appliance costing several hundred
us dollars, (imported from Germany) which can grind enough
for several loaves in about 15 minutes and as an
inferior survival backup a hand grinder which dosn't
get to bread flour size, takes a lot of effort for
just crushing the seeds and probably would take an hour
to process a couple lbs.
:-) Could be worse however...just a couple months ago,
the cover article of Scientific Americna was about
studies of the bones of early agricultural villages
in the Mid east...it appears that women (mostly) spent
many hours a day preparing the grain...and over the
course of a short life it distorted their bones, wore
down their teeth and was not that nutritionally balanced.

Eh, I nominate, even the currently dumbing down Scientific
American as a useful Survival periodical.
Les DeGroff

eenge...@worldbank.org

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Nov 7, 1994, 12:04:08 PM11/7/94
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In article <39f1i1$j...@romulus.ucs.uoknor.edu>,
Wheat is really an awesome food source, especially nice since most of
our ancestors lived off it for the last few thousand years and we
are now well adapted to it. If kept dry, in seed form (not polished,
ground, etc.) it is edible INDEFINITELY (at least for a few
lifetimes). It won't sprout after a while, which means no vitamin C
source, but is otherwise a complete meal. No Kwashiakor (sp?) or
Berri-Berri (sp?) from living on just wheat. The Mormons actually eat
the stuff today, and have lots of books and recipes, hand and
electric grinders, etc.

Actually, if you get good at making bread, you may find you don't
need to eat much else. You can even just throw some "berries" in your
mouth and chew. Not bad. Buy a bushel for $10 (lots more if
survival packed) and live off it for a month and think of the
savings! <g>

Thomas Rich Schwerdt

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Nov 7, 1994, 12:22:26 PM11/7/94
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In article <39f1i1$j...@romulus.ucs.uoknor.edu>,
Doug Kennedy <do...@hoek.uoknor.edu> wrote:

>I often see different sorts of wheat, rye, and other grains for
>sale in bulk. I've read these store well under nitrogen... but
>what can you do with it, besides make it into flour? Wheat on
>the cob? Hot buttered wheat? :) Really, anyone have any
>good wheat or other grain recipes to share?

As a really simple answer -- you could just boil it up into some
kind of gruel or thick soup. Cooking the wheat in some manner is
VERY important -- it was one of the big leaps that allowed humans to
shift from hunter/gartherer to agricultural. Cooking grains allows
your body to digest them much more fully than when raw. If you dont'
cook grains, you will feel full, but you will not get nearly enough
calories in your diet.

-Tom the Melaniephile

Rosaria Locasso

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Nov 7, 1994, 2:12:03 PM11/7/94
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In article j...@romulus.ucs.uoknor.edu, do...@hoek.uoknor.edu (Doug Kennedy) writes:
> I often see different sorts of wheat, rye, and other grains for
> sale in bulk. I've read these store well under nitrogen... but
> what can you do with it, besides make it into flour? Wheat on
> the cob? Hot buttered wheat? :) Really, anyone have any
> good wheat or other grain recipes to share?

I assume the bulk wheat you are seeing is whole, that is, wheat berries.
You can cook wheat berries as you would dried beans. Soak them and simmer for
an hour or so until they're tender. Of course, you put whatever else you want
in with it to make it tasty, like onion, or garlic or herbs/spices, or parsley,
or tomatoes or carrots or...well, you get the picture. You can add wheat berries
to a bean soup recipe, just combine the beans and berries at the beginning.
If you cook the wheat berries in advance, you can add a few to soups, to salads,
to pilafs. I suppose you could also make a wheat berry pilaf - I've never tried
this - might be kind of heavy with the whole berries.

You can grind the berries coarsely and you have the same nutty flavor but it
cooks quicker. This makes a good pilaf. It also makes a good cereal. Cook
the wheat in water or milk just like you would oats or cornmeal. Cooked wheat
cereal can be sweetened or buttered, whatever you ususally like with hot cereal.

Someone, Richard I think, mentioned a veggie-burger. I've never tried this, but
I would guess you could mix the coarsely ground wheat with seasonings and a little
egg to bind it, maybe some finely chopped onion and parsley. Then make it into
patties and fry. Or bake if you want to keep the fat down. Yummy, this sounds
good. Maybe I'll try this tonight and report back tomorrow.

Finally, you can grind it into flour and make baked goods. Use standard recipes
for breads, muffins, etc.

As for the other grains you mentioned, basically they are all just grains. So
you look at what you do with other grains, like rice or barley or wheat flour, for
example, and do the same thing.

Write to the companies whose products you use. Often, they will send you recipes
(since they want to encourage you to use their stuff).

Rosaria Locasso

W. Joseph Cooklin

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Nov 7, 1994, 8:10:06 PM11/7/94
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I read some where years ago that you could make bread using sprouted wheat
instead of flour or in combination with flour, never got a
recipe but this might make an interesting Saturday afternoon project this
winter. I think the wheat should be just barely sprouted (no green). It is
supposedly more nutritious than bread made with just flour.
--
Joseph Cooklin

Ray Keefer

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Nov 8, 1994, 12:38:42 PM11/8/94
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Hi,

> The Mormons actually eat
>the stuff today,

Nonsense. Most Mormons buy their bread in stores like everyone else.
The convienence is hard to beat. Though most have wheat in
Home Storage.

>and have lots of books and recipes,

Lots of books are available through our Beehive Distribution
Centers. I personally don't feel they are the best books.
But OK for general information.

>hand and
>electric grinders, etc.

Must be commercially made units for consumer markets. We
just buy from what is available to everyone else.

Regards,
Ray

Rosaria Locasso

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Nov 8, 1994, 6:09:01 PM11/8/94
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In article 5...@freenet.carleton.ca, aq...@FreeNet.Carleton.CA (W. Joseph Cooklin) writes:
>
> I read some where years ago that you could make bread using sprouted wheat
> instead of flour or in combination with flour...

Well, sure you can--it's a common grocery store item! I might have a recipe for
sprouted wheat bread. Let me know if you want me to look for it.


Rosaria Locasso


Rosaria Locasso

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Nov 8, 1994, 6:33:24 PM11/8/94
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In article 10...@worldbank.org, eenge...@worldbank.org writes:
>
> Wheat is really an awesome food source...

> It won't sprout after a while, which means no vitamin C
> source, but is otherwise a complete meal.

Are we talking about the same "wheat"? What do you mean "it's a complete meal"?
Are you suggesting that wheat alone provides a balanced diet? If so, I'd like
to hear your credentials, please.

> The Mormons actually eat
> the stuff today...

Don't we all?

>
> You can even just throw some "berries" in your
> mouth and chew.

If you're Tyrannosaurus Rex. Wheat berries are like rocks. Chewing wheat
berries would give all the culinary satisfaction of chewing on a dried
navy bean.

Rosaria Locasso


Paul Schwartz

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Nov 8, 1994, 8:24:56 PM11/8/94
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You can malt it and make beer!
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Bruce Harlan

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Nov 9, 1994, 11:49:38 AM11/9/94
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Well, if you were really into the labor, you could malt and roast it yourself
and make a quality beer. Again, not a lot of nutritional value, but one of
the little things that grease the wheels of life.

Bruce

Rosaria Locasso

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Nov 9, 1994, 5:30:11 PM11/9/94
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In article l...@crchh327.bnr.ca, har...@bnr.ca (Bruce Harlan) writes:
>
> Well, if you were really into the labor, you could malt and roast it yourself
> and make a quality beer. Again, not a lot of nutritional value, but one of
> the little things that grease the wheels of life.
>
> Bruce
>

Bruce,

What's involved in this process? Not in detail - I'm not going to actually
do it - but I'm curious to know the basic steps involved. What does it mean
to malt something? I thought malt was an ingredient in itself.

Rosaria Locasso


Richard A. De Castro

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Nov 9, 1994, 10:31:32 PM11/9/94
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cap...@netcom.com (Paul Schwartz) writes:

>You can malt it and make beer!
>--

Ah! A reasonable man!

Bruce Harlan

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Nov 10, 1994, 10:52:36 AM11/10/94
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> Bruce,

> Rosaria Locasso

Two things:

1) Read rec.crafts.brewing
These guys brew all the time, they have a FAQ and there are all levels of
expertise, including a few experts. This, of course, will get you the details
that you do not want, but if you drink beer, you will probably get hooked.

2) The malt is malted barley. The barley is allowed to germinate but not sprout.
This causes a conversion of the starch in the grain into usable sugars. When
the barley is germinated, it is roasted (to varying degrees) to stop the
germination/sprouting process and to add additional flavor.

3) Wheat beer is made from wheat (of course) with the possible addition of
adjuncts other than hops (depends on your taste and how much of a "purist"
you are). Thinking about it, I would have to look to see if the wheat is
malted or not. It may not be. I'm not to that stage of brewing (yet). Wheat
beer is usually made by those who have more experience than me.


Bruce

v...@ornl.gov

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Nov 10, 1994, 12:53:40 PM11/10/94
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Be warned: a sudden shift from a normal American (yuk) diet (??) to one
heavily dependent on wheat, or any other high-fiber regimen, will be
accompanied by a short period of adjustment commonly known as the three days I
spent in the head.

Mormons know this and routinely warn of it. The best defense [and a pretty
good idea for lots of other reasons] is a moderately high-fiber diet now.
{Despite what you may believe, whole-grain bread isn't toxic and veggies won't
cause acne}

hda...@usbr.gov

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Nov 10, 1994, 2:05:12 PM11/10/94
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><snip>It won't sprout after a while, which means no vitamin C

>source, but is otherwise a complete meal. No Kwashiakor (sp?) or
>Berri-Berri (sp?) from living on just wheat. The Mormons actually eat
>the stuff today, and have lots of books and recipes, hand and
>electric grinders, etc.
>

>Actually, if you get good at making bread, you may find you don't
>need to eat much else. You can even just throw some "berries" in your

>mouth and chew. Not bad. Buy a bushel for $10 (lots more if
>survivalpacked) and live off it for a month and think of the
>savings! <g>

I like the part about us Mormons actually eating the stuff today!
(Big, big grin here folks!) Actually, everybody (well, 99% of the
human race), eats wheat. Buy a hand grinder (about $50 for a cheap one
up to about $120 for a good one) and you have flour (wheat, rye, etc are
all good in flour). Then youhave bread, pasta, etc.

Or you can crack it (rough grind or two stones) and boil it, then let it
dry and you have wheat bulgar (good flavor and great with stews). Or just
take the whole wheat and let it cook in water overnight (crock pot or dutch
oven in the fire coals) and you have hot wheat cereal. (I love the stuff
with butter and honey!)

eenge...@worldbank.org

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Nov 10, 1994, 3:32:44 PM11/10/94
to

In article <39p1s4$e...@shemesh.tis.com>, <loc...@tis.com> writes:
> In article 10...@worldbank.org, eenge...@worldbank.org writes:
> >
> > Wheat is really an awesome food source...
> > It won't sprout after a while, which means no vitamin C
> > source, but is otherwise a complete meal.
>
> Are we talking about the same "wheat"? What do you mean "it's a
> complete meal"?
It has all essential amino acids, so you won't suffer any of
the deficiency diseases like Berri berri and Pelagra. (I
hope I have that right and spelled it right). There may be trace
metals missing, but you can live on JUST whole wheat for a LONG time
if you add Vitamin C.

> Are you suggesting that wheat alone provides a balanced diet? If
so, I'd like
> to hear your credentials, please.

Just what I've read, mostly in books and pamphlets by Mormons.
I'm no authority.

>
> > The Mormons actually eat
> > the stuff today...
>
> Don't we all?

Well, yes, but generally only highly processed forms. Few
people buy a bag of wheat kernels and take them home for
cooking.

>
> >
> > You can even just throw some "berries" in your
> > mouth and chew.
>
> If you're Tyrannosaurus Rex. Wheat berries are like rocks.
Chewing wheat
> berries would give all the culinary satisfaction of chewing on a
dried
> navy bean.

Hmm, maybe I've a bit different, but eating them wasn't much
more work than beek jerky. They certainly taste better than dried
beans, and won't chase others out of the "bunker" <G>. I certainly
wouldn't CHOOSE to eat wheat this way if there was a choice of
prepared forms, but you *can*. There's no other food I know of that
stores so long, is such a complete foodstuff, and which requires no
preparation for a TRex to just chew and swallow.

Good comments, though! Thanks.
>
> Rosaria Locasso
>
>

21012d

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Nov 10, 1994, 10:57:59 PM11/10/94
to
Malting is a process of letting grain start to germinate and
then drying it to stop the process. Malt can be done with
most of the cereal grains.
In the process (done properly) two things are accomplished,
the starch in the grain is converted to soluable and fermentable
sugars and additional stocks of enzymes capable of breaking
down additional grain starch is built up. Thus the extra
effort of malting needs to only be done to part of the
grain to be fermented, in whisky or other distellation stock
fermentations, ground malted grain can be mixed with ground
unmalted grain.
You run into "malt" in other contexts, malted milk, ovaltine.

In higher technology "Modern " fermentations, sometimes
"purified" enzymes are employed rather than malting. For
alchol fuel production there are tailored mixes commercially
available.
Les DeGroff

Neil Johnson

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Nov 10, 1994, 4:40:14 PM11/10/94
to

: >
: > You can even just throw some "berries" in your
: > mouth and chew.

: If you're Tyrannosaurus Rex. Wheat berries are like rocks. Chewing wheat
: berries would give all the culinary satisfaction of chewing on a dried
: navy bean.

: Rosaria Locasso

Wheat berries??? I grew up on a farm, and they were called kernels, just
like corn. Possibly this is a US/Canadian thing. Anyway, I have eaten
raw wheat and it tastes much better than beans, which are bitter. The
nutty description in some of the other postings is much closer to the
truth. It would take about five minutes of sucking/light chewing to
crack the hull. The wheat then took on a chewing gum like texture. About
a teaspoon of wheat made one mouthful. This is probably hard on teeth,
and I would definitely recommend soaking or cooking it instead.

Neil

v...@ornl.gov

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Nov 11, 1994, 7:47:12 AM11/11/94
to

>In article <39p1s4$e...@shemesh.tis.com>, <loc...@tis.com> writes:
>> In article 10...@worldbank.org, eenge...@worldbank.org writes:
>> >
>> > Wheat is really an awesome food source...
>> > It won't sprout after a while, which means no vitamin C
>> > source, but is otherwise a complete meal.
>>
>> Are we talking about the same "wheat"? What do you mean "it's a
>> complete meal"?
>It has all essential amino acids, so you won't suffer any of
>the deficiency diseases like Berri berri and Pelagra. (I
>hope I have that right and spelled it right). There may be trace
>metals missing, but you can live on JUST whole wheat for a LONG time
>if you add Vitamin C.

>> Are you suggesting that wheat alone provides a balanced diet? If
>so, I'd like
>> to hear your credentials, please.
>Just what I've read, mostly in books and pamphlets by Mormons.
>I'm no authority.

Having read most, if not all, the alluded to pamphlets I cannot recall one
that claims wheat is a complete food source {contains all amino acids needed}
A Basic-4 diet (wheat, milk, sugar, salt) is complete in amino acids _only_
because of the inclusion of an animal protein source - milk. Even at that
the good programs call for addition of vitamin supplements, as does the LDS
(Mormon) church heirarchy. A Basic-4 diet is a __survival__ diet, and I can
assure you, having lived off it for a week, is a very boring diet.

Total vegetarians find they have to include a variety of legumes to get enough
of all amino acids. You'd have to hit the bookshelf at a good health-food
store to get the info.

On the topic of boring: Keep in mind that survival is emotionally ripping.
You'll need to do some shade-tree psychiatry, like livening up the diet, to
try to prevent serious problems. Reference _Life After Doomsday_.

James Linn

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Nov 11, 1994, 11:01:32 AM11/11/94
to

Or just
> take the whole wheat and let it cook in water overnight (crock pot or dutch
> oven in the fire coals) and you have hot wheat cereal. (I love the stuff
> with butter and honey!)

I recall an older Canadian survival manual that said you could get most of your nutrients with two things that if properly stored last forever - wheat and honey.

I love bulgar too, though i don't know how you make it - i just be the processed stuff.

James...@nt.com
My opinions are MINE, MINE, MINE!

21012d

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Nov 12, 1994, 12:05:11 AM11/12/94
to
Bulgar is steamed and dryed wheat which is then cracked or cushed.

Think of it as partially cooked cracked wheat which allows later
cooking to be done faster and withough a long soak to loosen the
husk.

sne...@delphi.com

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Nov 14, 1994, 11:32:27 PM11/14/94
to
The LDS (Mormon) Church puts out a pamphlet titled "Home Production and Food
Storage" it is 8.5 x 11 and has about 48 pages, I think. They cost about
$1.00. I would be happy to pick them up at the church distribution center and
mail them to anybody who
wants to send me $1.00.
Just for your information, I am the owner of Nexco. This is the Nexco
internet"account.

Another suggestion: If you have an LDS cannery in your area, you can buy bulk
grains, etc at a reasonable cost and then pack it with nitrogen for the cost of
the #10 can. (I think it's about .75) You might want to chack the phone book
under "Church of J
esus Christ of Latter-day Saints" It would then be listed Under Cannery or
perhaps "Bishops Storehouse" I don't know how many canneries there are or
where they are located, so you'll have to check your local listings. I have
several other ideas on Prepa
ration if anyone's interested.

Rosaria Locasso

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Nov 15, 1994, 3:25:26 PM11/15/94
to
In article 28...@worldbank.org, eenge...@worldbank.org writes:
>
> In article <39p1s4$e...@shemesh.tis.com>, <loc...@tis.com> writes:
> >
> > Are we talking about the same "wheat"? What do you mean "it's a
> > complete meal"?
> It has all essential amino acids, so you won't suffer any of
> the deficiency diseases like Berri berri and Pelagra. (I
> hope I have that right and spelled it right). There may be trace
> metals missing, but you can live on JUST whole wheat for a LONG time
> if you add Vitamin C.
>

Well, in my opinion, this is a far cry from a complete meal. Perhaps you
meant to say that there are complete proteins in whole wheat products. (I've
never thought so, but I could be wrong. In general, grains need to be combined
with other foods in order to produce complete proteins.) In any case, just
having complete protein does not make for a balanced diet. Also, complete
protein will not prevent beriberi as this is caused by a deficiency of
Vitamin B1. According to the COD, the other deficiency disease you mentioned,
pellagra, is caused by a deficiency of nicotinic acid. (I have no idea where
nicotinic acid comes from in our diets.) As far as just surviving, simply being
able to hang on to life, I'm sure many who have been treated to a fare of bread
and water will attest to what you say.

> >
> > > The Mormons actually eat
> > > the stuff today...
> >
> > Don't we all?
> Well, yes, but generally only highly processed forms. Few
> people buy a bag of wheat kernels and take them home for
> cooking.

I misunderstood you here. I believe you just said "wheat" without specifying
the degree of processing. I should have known from the context that you were
talking about whole wheat berries.

In any case, I think that a more careful reading of those Mormon manuals would
seem to be in order. Otherwise, I fear that misinformation is (unintentionally)
being put forth as fact.


Rosaria Locasso


Rosaria Locasso

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Nov 15, 1994, 7:01:55 PM11/15/94
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In article 7...@shemesh.tis.com, loc...@tis.com (Rosaria Locasso) writes:
>
> According to the COD, the other deficiency disease you mentioned,
> pellagra, is caused by a deficiency of nicotinic acid. (I have no idea where
> nicotinic acid comes from in our diets.)

After I wrote this, I looked up nicotinic acid. According to the COD, this
is another name for Niacin, a vitamin in the B complex. It is found in milk,
liver and yeast.

Rosaria Locasso

v...@ornl.gov

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Nov 16, 1994, 7:43:56 AM11/16/94
to

>Rosaria Locasso


Yeast, huh? Does it survive baking? If so, homemade bread {a pleasure
beyond measure} could be listed as critical to long-term survival. Make that
sourdough, since commercial yeast supplies will dry up in weeks.

Charles Scripter

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Nov 16, 1994, 2:24:57 PM11/16/94
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On 16 Nov 1994 00:01:55 GMT, Rosaria Locasso (loc...@tis.com) wrote:

> After I wrote this, I looked up nicotinic acid. According to the COD, this
> is another name for Niacin, a vitamin in the B complex. It is found in milk,
> liver and yeast.

Yeast, huh?... Hmmm... Sounds like it's time to brew some beer with
that wheat. Gotta get that vitamin B(eer). ;)

--
Charles Scripter * cesc...@phy.mtu.edu
Dept of Physics, Michigan Tech, Houghton, MI 49931

Rosaria Locasso

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Nov 17, 1994, 2:51:22 PM11/17/94
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In my opinion, bread is necessary anyway since it is good for the soul! :-)
I wondered why the dictionary chose those particular sources since, in general,
B vitamins are found in high protein foods. I did a little reading last night
and, sure enough, Niacin and other Bs are also found in meats, legumes, nuts,
etc. In addition, our bodies can make Niacin from the amino acid tryptophan.

You brought up a good point about yeast supplies. Those who would be bakers
would greatly enhance their skills by knowing how to keep and use starters.

Rosaria Locasso

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