SUPERB LABOUR HUMILIATION

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The Rifleman

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Jan 2, 2004, 6:33:34 AM1/2/04
to
Oh Joyous day a LABOUR MP has relly shown them up in their true
undemocratic , promise breaking true selves. Never has such a humiliation
befallen a abour MP.
It was the day democracy ( something all labourites hate in favour of knee
jerk hysteria) left the BBC and a publicity grabbing LABOUR MP feeling
distinctly uncomfortable.

Stephen Pound MP had linkled up with radio 4 for a poll top find out which
single change in K law people would most like to see on the statute book.

Mr Pound LABOUR MP, PROMISED to adopt whichever proposal the public voted
for and to pilot it through parliament in the form of a private members
bill.

The vote as it happened voted overwhelmingly for.........A law allowing home
owners to protect themselves and their homes by any means, IE a strident
defence of the Tony Martin fiasco the farmer who was charged with murder
after killing a burglar on his remote farm after being told by the cops they
could not and would not protect him from a series of burglaries affecting
his property.

Naturally bering a LABOUR MP with the typical morals of a LABOURITE , MR
Pound LABOUR MP was forced into a humiliating retreat, turning his back on
the 25,000 voters and his promise to adopt their vote as a private members
bill was quoted as saying " MY enthiusiasm for democracy is now slightly
tempered, I must admit this is quite a difficult result".

The " Martin" law vote won over 37 % of the vote which if one remembers is
a higher percentage of the amount of people who voted LABOUR into office. So
now you have it folks you kknow exactly that labourites and the MPs do not
keep the promises they make, nor do they respect the will of the public. Of
course the rest of the LABOUR establishment immeadiately said such a bill
would never have been allowed anyway, if that was the case what was the
point of the whole exercise, and even more slimily the lying cheating
typical labourite MP has now said even though they dont recognise the wishes
of the public in the vote they will put forward the second place winner in
the poll which was something about organ doners.

Jeez the people of the UK would be better off trusting their kids with
Michael Jackson than this country to the perveerts of the labour party.


The Rifleman

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Jan 2, 2004, 6:38:19 AM1/2/04
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"The Rifleman" <steve...@day273723.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
news:bt3kv0$v63$1...@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...

> Oh Joyous day a LABOUR MP has relly shown them up in their true
> undemocratic , promise breaking true selves. Never has such a humiliation
> befallen a Labour MP.

> It was the day democracy ( something all labourites hate in favour of knee
> jerk hysteria) left the BBC and a publicity grabbing LABOUR MP feeling
> distinctly uncomfortable.
>
> Stephen Pound MP had linked up with radio 4 for a poll to find out which
> single change in law people would most like to see on the statute book.

Andrew McGee

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Jan 2, 2004, 6:39:19 AM1/2/04
to

"The Rifleman" <steve...@day273723.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
news:bt3kv0$v63$1...@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...

Well, I'm no fan of Labour, old or new, but it was a very silly idea to
promise to put forward whatever half-baked idea came out of a self-selecting
poll of this kind.

I am very glad that it has no chance of becoming law.

And it does nothing to dent my regard for democracy, which was very low in
the first place!


Elephar

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Jan 2, 2004, 6:54:43 AM1/2/04
to
The Rifleman wrote:
> Oh Joyous day a LABOUR MP has relly shown them up in their true
> undemocratic , promise breaking true selves. Never has such a
> humiliation befallen a abour MP.
> It was the day democracy ( something all labourites hate in favour of
> knee jerk hysteria) left the BBC and a publicity grabbing LABOUR MP
> feeling distinctly uncomfortable.
>

I just love his quoted remark in the Mail...
"The people have spoken........the BASTARDS!"

ROTFL

Col

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Jan 2, 2004, 7:08:10 AM1/2/04
to

"The Rifleman" <steve...@day273723.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
news:bt3kv0$v63$1...@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...
> Oh Joyous day a LABOUR MP has relly shown them up in their true
> undemocratic , promise breaking true selves. Never has such a humiliation
> befallen a abour MP.
> It was the day democracy ( something all labourites hate in favour of knee
> jerk hysteria) left the BBC and a publicity grabbing LABOUR MP feeling
> distinctly uncomfortable.
>
> Stephen Pound MP had linkled up with radio 4 for a poll top find out which
> single change in K law people would most like to see on the statute book.
>
> Mr Pound LABOUR MP, PROMISED to adopt whichever proposal the public voted
> for and to pilot it through parliament in the form of a private members
> bill.
>
> The vote as it happened voted overwhelmingly for.........A law allowing home
> owners to protect themselves and their homes by any means, IE a strident
> defence of the Tony Martin fiasco the farmer who was charged with murder
> after killing a burglar on his remote farm after being told by the cops they
> could not and would not protect him from a series of burglaries affecting
> his property.
>

Rumour has it that this poll was hijacked at the last minute by supporters
of Tony Martin.
Still, it was rather brave (or rather stupid!) for an MP to promise to pursue
a bill though parliament when they didn't even know that they were going
to agree with it.

As I read this morning in my newspaper, 'Hoisted by his own petard!'

Quite.

Col
--
So where are they, Mr Blair?


The Rifleman

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Jan 2, 2004, 7:02:07 AM1/2/04
to
Actually Laurence I think republicism is most certainly on the increase in
the UK, but the problem is the sheeple still believe the garbage spewed out
by the police and politicians.and when you have so many willing socialist
parasites who will do anything the politicians tell them so long as they get
their dole and benefits nothing will improve.


The Rifleman

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Jan 2, 2004, 7:02:59 AM1/2/04
to

"Elephar" <ele...@pipex.com> wrote in message
news:bt3m63$2udv5$1...@ID-46833.news.uni-berlin.de...

Naturally being a labourite he is going to look at the will of the people
and ignore it.
>
>


The Rifleman

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Jan 2, 2004, 7:07:46 AM1/2/04
to

> Rumour has it that this poll was hijacked at the last minute by supporters
> of Tony Martin.
> Still, it was rather brave (or rather stupid!) for an MP to promise to
pursue
> a bill though parliament when they didn't even know that they were going
> to agree with it.
>
> As I read this morning in my newspaper, 'Hoisted by his own petard!'
>
> Quite.
>
> Col
Ah but Col it could have just as easily been hijacked by say the anti hunt
lobby, or the pro euro lobby and I am DAMN 1000% certain he would have
adopted it their and then cos the people have spoken ???


Wotan

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Jan 2, 2004, 7:47:45 AM1/2/04
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"The Rifleman" <steve...@day273723.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
news:bt3kv0$v63$1...@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...
> Oh Joyous day a LABOUR MP has really shown them up in their true

> undemocratic , promise breaking true selves. Never has such a
humiliation
> befallen a Labour MP.

> It was the day democracy ( something all labourites hate in favour
of knee
> jerk hysteria) left the BBC and a publicity grabbing LABOUR MP
feeling
> distinctly uncomfortable.
>

> Stephen Pound MP had linked up with radio 4 for a poll top find out
which
> single change in the law people would most like to see on the


statute book.
>
> Mr Pound LABOUR MP, PROMISED to adopt whichever proposal the public
voted
> for and to pilot it through parliament in the form of a private
members
> bill.
>
> The vote as it happened voted overwhelmingly for.........A law
allowing home
> owners to protect themselves and their homes by any means, IE a
strident
> defence of the Tony Martin fiasco the farmer who was charged with
murder
> after killing a burglar on his remote farm after being told by the
cops they
> could not and would not protect him from a series of burglaries
affecting
> his property.

Yes, it does show the reptiles up in their true light.

They hope to be able to manipulate the public to fit in with
their own treacherous schemes - and when the public does not
- they are all condemned as "fascists" and "Nazis".

The problem Blair's subversive International Marxist scum have
is that the electorate are going to rip them to pieces.

Because Blair's maggot filth are not even nearly as clever as
they like to think they are - and the British people are a damn
sight more shrewd than they would like to believe !

Their days are numbered and the clock is ticking down to
the day of their doom and just desserts.


Wotan

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Jan 2, 2004, 7:50:08 AM1/2/04
to

"Andrew McGee" <amh...@btopenworld.com> wrote in message
news:bt3l97$p9d$1...@sparta.btinternet.com...

>
> "The Rifleman" <steve...@day273723.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
> >
> > The vote as it happened voted overwhelmingly for.........A law
allowing
> home
> > owners to protect themselves and their homes by any means, >

> I am very glad that it has no chance of becoming law.

Why ? Are you in favour of the yob culture and allowing thugs
to murder people in their own homes ?

> And it does nothing to dent my regard for democracy, which
> was very low in the first place!

"EU" quislings have NO regard for democracy.

Wotan

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Jan 2, 2004, 7:52:56 AM1/2/04
to

"Lawrence Glickman" <lgli...@ameritech.net> wrote in message
news:ukmavvscirtjmfetg...@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 2 Jan 2004 11:33:34 -0000, "The Rifleman"
> <steve...@day273723.fsnet.co.uk> wrote:
>
> snips for brevity

> |Jeez the people of the UK would be better off trusting their kids
with
> |Michael Jackson than this country to the perveerts of the labour
party.
>
> I think it is time for the UK to have a London Tea Party on the
> Thames.

That day draws near.

The days of Blair and the criminal filth who protect him and keep
him in power are numbered - and the numnbers are low.


Wotan

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Jan 2, 2004, 7:54:16 AM1/2/04
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"Elephar" <ele...@pipex.com> wrote in message
news:bt3m63$2udv5$1...@ID-46833.news.uni-berlin.de...

The open contempt for the people by Blair and his "EU" quisling
criminal scum is notorious. And they will pay a terrible price
for it.


rickb30...@yahoo.com

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Jan 2, 2004, 8:23:00 AM1/2/04
to

If you want a class on how to toss off the Royals,
let us know. :-)
That, or call Ghandi's bunch. :-)


Col

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Jan 2, 2004, 8:35:11 AM1/2/04
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"The Rifleman" <steve...@day273723.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
news:bt3mu1$i3o$1...@newsg4.svr.pol.co.uk...

I'm sure he would, but that's politicians for you.
I think a Tory MP in the same situation would have done much the same
thing. I can't believe that he was stupid enough to think that there wasn't
some risk attached to this venture. it is well known that open polls such
as this can be sabotaged by concerted groups of individuals.
He must have known about this and taken a calculated risk.
Unfortunately for him it blew up in his face!

Now I wonder if we really have to go through the farce of wasting parliamentary
time by introducing a bill that even the MP introducing it disagrees with?

Frank White

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Jan 2, 2004, 8:19:22 AM1/2/04
to
In article <bt3kv0$v63$1...@news7.svr.pol.co.uk>,
steve...@day273723.fsnet.co.uk says...

<snip>

>Jeez the people of the UK would be better off trusting their kids with
>Michael Jackson than this country to the perveerts of the labour party.

So. Can we take this to mean you're not a fan of Labour?

^_^

FW

Elephar

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Jan 2, 2004, 8:39:55 AM1/2/04
to
Col wrote:
<Snip>

> as this can be sabotaged by concerted groups of individuals.
> He must have known about this and taken a calculated risk.
> Unfortunately for him it blew up in his face!
>

Could it not just possibly be, even remotely possibly, that no hi-jack took
place and the view expressed really was the view of the majority of the
population?

Col

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Jan 2, 2004, 8:50:19 AM1/2/04
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"Elephar" <ele...@pipex.com> wrote in message
news:bt3sba$2v867$1...@ID-46833.news.uni-berlin.de...

Of course it could.
However there was a sudden rush of votes for this bill right at the end,
leading one to wonder.........

Jonathan Bratt

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Jan 2, 2004, 8:45:42 AM1/2/04
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In message <3ff5...@212.67.96.135>, Wotan <Wo...@Valhalla.net> writes

>The days of Blair and the criminal filth who protect him and keep him
>in power are numbered - and the numnbers are low.

What might that number be bobby?
--
Jonathan Bratt

Jonathan Bratt

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Jan 2, 2004, 8:47:13 AM1/2/04
to
In message <bt3ml1$hss$1...@newsg4.svr.pol.co.uk>, The Rifleman
<steve...@day273723.fsnet.co.uk> writes

A poll on the Today programme does not represent the will of the people.
Such polls are easily open to pressure groups. It was an amusing
exercise, nothing more.
--
Jonathan Bratt

Jonathan Bratt

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Jan 2, 2004, 8:46:20 AM1/2/04
to
In message <bt3m63$2udv5$1...@ID-46833.news.uni-berlin.de>, Elephar
<ele...@pipex.com> writes

He was - I think - quoting an American politician from some time back.
--
Jonathan Bratt

Jonathan Bratt

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Jan 2, 2004, 8:49:15 AM1/2/04
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In message <3ff5...@212.67.96.135>, Wotan <Wo...@Valhalla.net> writes
>Their days are numbered

Hazard a guess old fruit.
--
Jonathan Bratt

Jonathan Bratt

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Jan 2, 2004, 8:48:43 AM1/2/04
to
In message <bt3sba$2v867$1...@ID-46833.news.uni-berlin.de>, Elephar
<ele...@pipex.com> writes

No.

--
Jonathan Bratt

David Morton

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Jan 2, 2004, 9:07:00 AM1/2/04
to
In article <es50qHYsYX9$Ew...@aol.com>, jonny...@aol.com (Jonathan Bratt)
wrote:

> He was - I think - quoting an American politician from some time back.

Dick Tuck, after losing the 1966 California State Senate race.

Elephar

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Jan 2, 2004, 9:48:20 AM1/2/04
to

Yep, but it sounded heartfelt.
Put me in mind of a certain B'Stard MP on the box.....


Elephar

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Jan 2, 2004, 9:51:06 AM1/2/04
to

Spoken like a true New Lab politician.
If your not one, you missed your vocation.


Col

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Jan 2, 2004, 9:58:51 AM1/2/04
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"Jonathan Bratt" <jonny...@aol.com> wrote in message
news:Mccw2GZ7aX9$Ew...@aol.com...

I wouldn't entirely dismiss the idea.
I'm sure a significant minority of people in this country would
vote for peadophiles to be nailed by their testicles to the nearest
lampost, if given the chance.........

The Rifleman

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Jan 2, 2004, 9:59:11 AM1/2/04
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<rickb30...@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:3ff57072...@news.oxy.com...
> I'll say one thing about communism at least the commies knew how to deal
with the russian royal family.


Richard Miller

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Jan 2, 2004, 10:11:50 AM1/2/04
to
In message <bt3kv0$v63$1...@news7.svr.pol.co.uk>, The Rifleman
<steve...@day273723.fsnet.co.uk> writes

>Oh Joyous day a LABOUR MP has relly shown them up in their true
>undemocratic , promise breaking true selves. Never has such a humiliation
>befallen a abour MP.

[Snip]

> Of
>course the rest of the LABOUR establishment immeadiately said such a bill
>would never have been allowed anyway, if that was the case what was the
>point of the whole exercise, and even more slimily the lying cheating
>typical labourite MP has now said even though they dont recognise the wishes
>of the public in the vote they will put forward the second place winner in
>the poll which was something about organ doners.
>

>Jeez the people of the UK would be better off trusting their kids with
>Michael Jackson than this country to the perveerts of the labour party.
>
>

Thank God for a Labour MP with more sense than the general public.

First, the proposed new law would not have actually changed the law at
all. It cannot be changed without legitimising rape, child abuse,
torture and murder. The current law provides all the permission people
need to defend themselves.

Secondly, when comparing the risk that someone would want/need to defend
themselves in a way not presently permitted by law with the risk that
they will need a transplant and find no organs available, the risk of
the latter is exponentially higher than the former, so the transplants
bill will save and improve far more lives than the bill that won the
vote.

When I heard the result of the poll, I despaired that my fellow
countrymen were so stupid. I am greatly relieved at Stephen Pound's
obviously sensible decision.
--
Richard Miller

Richard Miller

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Jan 2, 2004, 10:16:06 AM1/2/04
to
In message <bt3sba$2v867$1...@ID-46833.news.uni-berlin.de>, Elephar
<ele...@pipex.com> writes

Maybe.

Unfortunately, as threads about TM on these groups have illustrated, a
large proportion of the population fundamentally misunderstand what the
law of this country does and does not allow. Among those who have a
correct understanding, very few see any need for change.
--
Richard Miller

Graham Innocent

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Jan 2, 2004, 10:33:02 AM1/2/04
to
> Rumour has it that this poll was hijacked at the last minute by supporters
> of Tony Martin.

Almost certainly. However, that could be said about whichever
proposition won, and merely demonstrates the strength of support for
Tony Martin's plight.

> Still, it was rather brave (or rather stupid!) for an MP to promise to pursue
> a bill though parliament when they didn't even know that they were going
> to agree with it.

Yes. Although with a bit of luck all that arrogant bluster about not
being so keen on democracy when ordinary people disagree with him will
lose the twerp his seat.

Barry

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Jan 2, 2004, 10:39:20 AM1/2/04
to
Is your remark intended to convey that Michael Jackson is a criminal?

Well if so, I can see why you would make such a remark. I live in Canada
and have access to all the US TV news stations, all of whom have
convicted Michael Jackson and actively encourage their viewers to do the
same.

By the time he comes to trial, it will not be about a guilty verdict
because this has already been decided by the American public. It will be
about the jail sentence he gets.

Although the British justice system is far from perfect the case would
now be sub-judice which could never happen in the US, otherwise half
your TV and Radio stations would close down for lack of subjects.
Example - the Peterson case - oh! definately guilty heh! Has to be,
right! No other suspects and after all he did chop up his wife and rip
the out the 8 month old baby from her belly. Was that before or after
she was dumped in the water?

I have no love for some of the British justice system but that of the
USA is worse than that practiced in third world countries. It's more
about re-electing the officials who enact and dispense justice than
about the crime, where the accused is guilty before being proved
innocent.

Perhaps it's also the reason for the many fictional TV programmes that
are aired in the US. After all, that's the only way to see an accused
person be judged innocent. Could be why they are so popular.

Barry


"Lawrence Glickman" <lgli...@ameritech.net> wrote in message
news:ukmavvscirtjmfetg...@4ax.com...

> On Fri, 2 Jan 2004 11:33:34 -0000, "The Rifleman"
> <steve...@day273723.fsnet.co.uk> wrote:
>
> snips for brevity


> |Jeez the people of the UK would be better off trusting their kids
with
> |Michael Jackson than this country to the perveerts of the labour
party.
>

> I think it is time for the UK to have a London Tea Party on the

> Thames. Not drinking the tea, TOSSING IT OVERBOARD.
>
>
> Lg


Solon

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Jan 2, 2004, 11:06:56 AM1/2/04
to
On Fri, 2 Jan 2004 13:47:13 +0000, Jonathan Bratt <jonny...@aol.com>
enlightened the denizens of uk.politics.misc by writing:

>>> I just love his quoted remark in the Mail...
>>> "The people have spoken........the BASTARDS!"

>>> ROTFL

>>Naturally being a labourite he is going to look at the will of the people

>A poll on the Today programme does not represent the will of the people.
>Such polls are easily open to pressure groups. It was an amusing
>exercise, nothing more.

But it was a bit more than that, wasn't it? For whatever reason,
Stephen Pound said that he would use his "slot" to promote a Bill
chosen by the Today programme's listeners. No doubt he held himself
out as being very democratic and broad-minded about it, put on a
"brave" face on the possibility that "the people" might chose a Bill
with which he disagreed, and mouthed platitudes about being a "servant
of the people" etc etc.

Of course, it now turns out that the choice he was offering was an
"any colour you like so long as its black" type choice: and that he
has no intention of being bound by a choice with which he disagrees.

It certainly isn't the first time that a politician - even one as
amusing as Stephen Pound - has gone back on a promise but I do not
think that such an event can be dismissed as "an amusing exercise". At
best, this exercise speaks volumes about Mr Pound's judgment - at
worst, his honesty - and the frivolity with which he appears to view
his legislative authority.


--
Solon

Elephar

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Jan 2, 2004, 11:14:57 AM1/2/04
to

Ah, Richard, I see.
If I agree with you with regard to this subject then I am a sensible member
of the public.
If I disagree, it's just because I don't comprehend the facts.
Could it be that we might actually understand those facts but feel that
things are fundamentally cock-eyed?


Dirk Bruere at Neopax

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Jan 2, 2004, 11:18:48 AM1/2/04
to

"The Rifleman" <steve...@day273723.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
news:bt3kv0$v63$1...@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...

> Oh Joyous day a LABOUR MP has relly shown them up in their true
> undemocratic , promise breaking true selves. Never has such a humiliation
> befallen a abour MP.
> It was the day democracy ( something all labourites hate in favour of knee
> jerk hysteria) left the BBC and a publicity grabbing LABOUR MP feeling
> distinctly uncomfortable.
>
> Stephen Pound MP had linkled up with radio 4 for a poll top find out which
> single change in K law people would most like to see on the statute book.

>
> Mr Pound LABOUR MP, PROMISED to adopt whichever proposal the public voted
> for and to pilot it through parliament in the form of a private members
> bill.
>
> The vote as it happened voted overwhelmingly for.........A law allowing
home
> owners to protect themselves and their homes by any means, IE a strident
> defence of the Tony Martin fiasco the farmer who was charged with murder
> after killing a burglar on his remote farm after being told by the cops
they
> could not and would not protect him from a series of burglaries affecting
> his property.
>
> Naturally bering a LABOUR MP with the typical morals of a LABOURITE , MR
> Pound LABOUR MP was forced into a humiliating retreat, turning his back on
> the 25,000 voters and his promise to adopt their vote as a private members
> bill was quoted as saying " MY enthiusiasm for democracy is now slightly
> tempered, I must admit this is quite a difficult result".

> The " Martin" law vote won over 37 % of the vote which if one remembers
is
> a higher percentage of the amount of people who voted LABOUR into office.
So
> now you have it folks you kknow exactly that labourites and the MPs do not
> keep the promises they make, nor do they respect the will of the public.


Of
> course the rest of the LABOUR establishment immeadiately said such a bill
> would never have been allowed anyway, if that was the case what was the
> point of the whole exercise, and even more slimily the lying cheating
> typical labourite MP has now said even though they dont recognise the
wishes
> of the public in the vote they will put forward the second place winner in
> the poll which was something about organ doners.


People get what they deserve.
Labour (and Con and Liberal) are effectively the same party with minor
arguments over how the small change is to be spent.

--
Dirk

The Consensus:-
The political party for the new millennium
http://www.theconsensus.org


Anthony Edwards

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Jan 2, 2004, 11:20:41 AM1/2/04
to
On Fri, 2 Jan 2004 13:47:13 +0000, Jonathan Bratt <jonny...@aol.com> wrote:

> A poll on the Today programme does not represent the will of the people.
> Such polls are easily open to pressure groups. It was an amusing
> exercise, nothing more.

Something I found ironic is that, according to reports that I have
read, the proposed new legislation voted for by those taking part
in the poll would only give home owners the right to use unlimited
(including lethal) force against intruders in their homes, and council
(and other) tenants would be given no such benefit, with existing
law remaining the status quo in such situations.

Why home owners feel that they should be entitled to more legal
protection than other householders in their attempts to repel burglars
is beyond me. Actually, what is needed is a drastic shake-up
in policing methods, with police actually attempting to apprehend
burglars and bring them to justice, as opposed to the extremely low
detection and conviction rates that exist at present.

--
Anthony Edwards
ant...@catfish.nildram.co.uk

half_pint

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Jan 2, 2004, 11:33:28 AM1/2/04
to

"The Rifleman" <steve...@day273723.fsnet.co.uk> wrote in message
news:bt3kv0$v63$1...@news7.svr.pol.co.uk...
>
> The vote as it happened voted overwhelmingly for.........A law allowing
home
> owners to protect themselves and their homes by any means, IE a strident
> defence of the Tony Martin fiasco the farmer who was charged with murder

Wrong no vote allowing homeowners to shoot children in the back without
warning (or even with warning) was taken.
So sorry to dampen your squib.
Murder is still illegal in the UK despite the the efforts to legalise it as
a sport
to replace fox hunting for the landowbing classes.

> after killing a burglar on his remote farm after being told by the cops
they
> could not and would not protect him from a series of burglaries affecting
> his property.
>

And if police had indeed been there and acted as child murderer murderer
Martin had they would be behind bars too.


> Naturally bering a LABOUR MP with the typical morals of a LABOURITE , MR
> Pound LABOUR MP was forced into a humiliating retreat, turning his back on
> the 25,000 voters and his promise to adopt their vote as a private members
> bill was quoted as saying " MY enthiusiasm for democracy is now slightly
> tempered, I must admit this is quite a difficult result".


Of course there is nothing democratic about a poll of radio 4 listeners,
you might as well poll tory party head office.


>
> The " Martin" law vote won over 37 % of the vote which if one remembers
is
> a higher percentage of the amount of people who voted LABOUR into office.

And of course as I understand it the vote was rigged anyway which is typical
of the right wing child killing gun lobby.
Typical of the right wing who will cheat and murder to gain power.

>So
> now you have it folks you kknow exactly that labourites and the MPs do not
> keep the promises they make, nor do they respect the will of the public.
Of
> course the rest of the LABOUR establishment immeadiately said such a bill
> would never have been allowed anyway, if that was the case what was the
> point of the whole exercise, and even more slimily the lying cheating
> typical labourite MP has now said even though they dont recognise the
wishes
> of the public in the vote they will put forward the second place winner in
> the poll which was something about organ doners.
>

> Jeez the people of the UK would be better off trusting their kids with
> Michael Jackson than this country to the perveerts of the labour party.

Or trust them to Martin so he could shoot them in the back, like the
coward he is.

>
>

--
---------------
regards half_pint


The Rifleman

unread,
Jan 2, 2004, 11:41:15 AM1/2/04
to
> Why home owners feel that they should be entitled to more legal
> protection than other householders in their attempts to repel burglars
> is beyond me.

They should not, all people in their homes bought or rented should have
equal protection under the law.


Actually, what is needed is a drastic shake-up
> in policing methods, with police actually attempting to apprehend
> burglars and bring them to justice, as opposed to the extremely low
> detection and co