Grain Robot

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Dean Hoffman

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Jun 2, 2021, 8:22:06 AMJun 2
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A couple guys have invented a gizmo to help keep farmers out of
grain bins.
<https://ianrnews.unl.edu/husker-undergrads-earn-national-award-grain-robot>

Doug Chadduck

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Jun 2, 2021, 11:53:56 AMJun 2
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Outstanding. I'm originally from North Dakota and grew up and worked
around grain bins. Levelled a lot of truck loads of small grains (oats,
barley, wheat) before heading out of the field. Stuff can be like
quicksand. Bins I remember were round and cone shaped on top. We never
went in them once they were filling. Though some did and some die every
year. Good job guys.

Dean Hoffman

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Jun 5, 2021, 7:55:19 AMJun 5
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Safety doesn't seem to be at the top of the daily list for farmers. I spent my working
years fixing irrigation systems. It was unusual to find a shield on the driveshaft from
the engine to the gearhead on an irrigation well. Those would typically spin at about 2,100
rpm. Oil, diesel fuel, and water naturally make things slippery. The oil and fuel naturally spill a
bit over the years even for the careful guys.

Doug Chadduck

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Jun 5, 2021, 5:41:49 PMJun 5
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If I remember correctly, they were straight down under the seat towards
the trailer hitch.

Dean Hoffman

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Jun 6, 2021, 11:53:09 AMJun 6
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You must be thinking of the tractor PTO. This might be a good example of how different farming is in different parts of the country. It sounds like it's been a couple days since you were on the farm. Here's a tractor with some type of shredder or mower.
<http://www.ccidriveline.com/images/cms/PTO-shaft.jpg>. Implement makers have been putting PTO guards on the implement drive shafts for a long time now. It's just heavy plastic like you see here but it works.
I was thinking of these:
<https://www.purplewave.com/auction/130410/item/E8471>
The controls and clutch lever for the engine are on the back of the engine. One has
to stand by the driveshaft to start things up. Notice the metal driveshaft cover is laying right
under the drive shaft. The dirt under the engine looks black. Someone has spilled some oil over time.
I had a couple uncles in Idaho. They raised potatoes. I wouldn't know a potato digger if I tripped over
one.


Doug Chadduck

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Jun 8, 2021, 6:06:28 PMJun 8
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On 6/6/2021 8:53 AM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
> On Saturday, June 5, 2021 at 4:41:49 PM UTC-5, Doug Chadduck wrote:
>> On 6/5/2021 4:55 AM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
>>> On Wednesday, June 2, 2021 at 10:53:56 AM UTC-5, Doug Chadduck wrote:
>>>> On 6/2/2021 5:22 AM, Dean Hoffman wrote:
>>>>> A couple guys have invented a gizmo to help keep farmers out of
>>>>> grain bins.
>>>>> <https://ianrnews.unl.edu/husker-undergrads-earn-national-award-grain-robot>
>>>>>
>>>> Outstanding. I'm originally from North Dakota and grew up and worked
>>>> around grain bins. Levelled a lot of truck loads of small grains (oats,
>>>> barley, wheat) before heading out of the field. Stuff can be like
>>>> quicksand. Bins I remember were round and cone shaped on top. We never
>>>> went in them once they were filling. Though some did and some die every
>>>> year. Good job guys.
>>>
>>> Safety doesn't seem to be at the top of the daily list for farmers.

Remember that attitude. "Aw it's OK. Don't worry about it." Yup.

I spent my working
>>> years fixing irrigation systems. It was unusual to find a shield on the driveshaft from
>>> the engine to the gearhead on an irrigation well. Those would typically spin at about 2,100
>>> rpm. Oil, diesel fuel, and water naturally make things slippery. The oil and fuel naturally spill a
>>> bit over the years even for the careful guys.
>>>
>> If I remember correctly, they were straight down under the seat towards
>> the trailer hitch.
>
> You must be thinking of the tractor PTO.


I stand corrected. I thought of that after I sent the post. Most PTOs
were covered, but not all. Remember very early being repeatedly told to
watch out for them. Have a friend back home almost lost it when a grain
auger snagged his pants leg. Not sure of the story but he got away
without to much damage. To much being relative.


This might be a good example of how different farming is in different
parts of the country. It sounds like it's been a couple days since you
were on the farm.

Maybe a shade over 50 years. Spent all my high school summers in the
fields or farms one way or another. Lived in town (100 people maybe, if
relatives were in town)
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