Ritalin class action suit

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John

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May 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/23/00
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Ritalin Fraud http://www.ritalinfraud.com/
The law firm of Waters & Kraus takes this opportunity to announce the filing
in Texas of a class action lawsuit entitled Hernandez, Plaintiff,
Individually and on Behalf of all Others Similarly Situated v. Ciba Geigy
Corporation, U.S.A., Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, Children and
Adults With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD), and the
American Psychiatric Association. Dr. Peter Breggin is serving as a medical
consultant in the case.

While this filing is a departure from Waters & Kraus' continuing practice of
toxic exposure and cancer cases, the pattern and practice of improper
conduct on the part of the defendants in this case rivals that of the
asbestos corporate defendants and tobacco companies in other cases.

The suit states allegations based on fraud and conspiracy. From
approximately 1955 through 1995, the exclusive or primary manufacturer and
supplier of Ritalin in this country was defendant Ciba-Geigy Corp., U.S.A.
("Ciba"). In 1996 Ciba merged with Sandoz Pharmaceuticals Corp. to become
defendant Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corp. ("Novartis"). Ciba/Novartis has
manufactured, marketed and sold Ritalin since approximately 1955.

Ciba/Novartis planned, conspired, and colluded to create, develop and
promote the diagnosis of Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and Attention
Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in a highly successful effort to
increase the market for its product Ritalin. In addition to its actions and
involvement with the creation of the ADD and ADHD diagnosis, Ciba/Novartis
took steps to promote and dramatically increase the sales of Ritalin by way
of the following:

Actively promoting and supporting the concept that a significant percentage
of children suffer from a "disease" which required narcotic
treatment/therapy;
Actively promoting Ritalin as the "drug of choice" to treat children
diagnosed with ADD and ADHD:
Actively supporting groups such as Defendant CHADD, both financially and
with other means, so that such organizations would promote and support (as a
supposed neutral party) the ever-increasing implementation of ADD/ADHD
diagnoses as well as directly increasing Ritalin sales;
Distributing misleading sales and promotional literature to parents, schools
and other interested persons in a successful effort to further increase the
number of diagnoses and the number of persons prescribed Ritalin.
Defendant CHADD (Children and Adults with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity
Disorder) has been a recipient of financial donations and contributions from
Defendants Ciba/Novartis for many years. CHADD received $748,000 from
Ciba/Novartis in the period 1991 to 1994 alone. During the periods when
CHADD received funding from Ciba/Novartis, CHADD deliberately made efforts
to increase the sales of Ritalin, and to increase the supply of
methylphenidate (the generic name for Ritalin) available in the United
States, and to reduce or eliminate laws and restrictions concerning the use
of Ritalin and methylphenidate in the United States, all to the financial
benefit of Ciba/Novartis. Ciba/Novartis made such financial contributions
with the purpose of advertising and promoting sales of Ritalin - an
internationally controlled substance. Ciba/Novartis has thus repeatedly
violated Article 10 of the United Nations Convention on Psychotropic
Substances, 1019 U.N.T.S. 175 (1971).

CHADD's activities nationwide have led to significant increase in the amount
of Ritalin taken by school children and have directly resulted in enormous
profits to Ciba/Novartis.

Parents, the school districts and other interested parties are generally
unaware that use of Ritalin can cause a significant number of health
problems and risks, including but not limited to the following:

Cardiovascular
Rapid heart beat (palpitations, tachycardia)
High blood pressure (hypertension)
Unusual heart rhythm (arrythmia)
Heart attack (cardiac arrest)
Central Nervous System
Altered mental status (psychosis)
Hallucinations
Depression or excitement
Convulsions / seizures (excessive brain stimulation)
Drowsiness or "dopey" feeling
Confusion
Lack of sleep (insomnia)
Agitation, irritation, anxiety, nervousness
Hostility
Unhappiness (Dysphoria)
Impaired mental abilities (cognitive impairment on tests)
Jerky movements (Dyskinesias, tics, Tourette's syndrome)
Nervous habits (such as picking at skin or pulling hair)
Compulsive behavior
Depression/over-sensitivity
Decreased social interest
Zombie-like behavior
Gastrointestinal
Eating disorders (anorexia)
Nausea
Vomiting
Stomach ache / cramps
Dry mouth
Constipation
Abnormal liver function tests
Endocrine/Metabolic
Growth problems (pituitary dysfunction)
Weight loss
Other
Blurred vision
Headache
Dizziness
Rash/conjunctivitis/hives
Hair loss
Inflammation of the skin (dermatitis)
Blood disorders (anorexia, leukoplacia)
Involuntary discharge of urine (enuresis)
Fever
Joint pain
Unusual sweating
Withdrawal and Rebound
Sleep problems (insomnia)
Evening crash
Depression
Over-activity and irritability
Worsening of ADHD-like symptoms


In addition, it is not generally known or understood by the public that use
of Ritalin will preclude a child from ever joining the United States
military because Ritalin is classified as a Class II controlled substance,
along with morphine and other amphetamines.


Chris Leithiser

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May 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/23/00
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John wrote:
>
> Ritalin Fraud http://www.ritalinfraud.com/

They got the name right, at least. If Breggin is involved, fraud can't
be far behind.

G03090103

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May 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/23/00
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Chris Leithiser clei...@bc.cc.ca.us wrote:

And we all know he's full of sh*t, 'cause his wife was a (as Mark Probert would
write) $cientologi$t, right? What a perfect example of an ad hominem attack.

JG

Chris Leithiser

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May 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/23/00
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Why, yes, a perfect example of your using ad-hominem against Mark! :)

Actually, both he and his wife, Ginger (who escaped from the cult) both
have nasty things to say about it. Publicly. They're still very much
in bed with people who think they're spiritually descended from seafood,
because the money's good.

Chris Leithiser

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May 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/23/00
to
G03090103 wrote:
>
> Chris Leithiser clei...@bc.cc.ca.us wrote:
>
> >G03090103 wrote:
>
> >Why, yes, a perfect example of your using ad-hominem against Mark! :)
> >
> No, Chris, it isn't. Rather than debate fallacies, I'll just refer you (and
> anyone else who might be remotely interested) to the Nizkor Project,
> http://www.nizkor.org/features/fallacies .

No problem, I'm familiar with _both_ forms of the Ad Hom fallacy. Hence
the Smiley at the end of my little joke.

> I've not attacked Mark; he has, on numerous occasions, written "Scientologist"
> with dollar signs in place of the esses.

I do that too. That's in honor of their highest "dynamic," the Buck.

> >Actually, both he and his wife, Ginger (who escaped from the cult) both
> >have nasty things to say about it. Publicly. They're still very much
> >in bed with people who think they're spiritually descended from seafood,
> >because the money's good.
>

> And this invalidates Breggin's views because???

It doesn't invalidate Breggin's views. He does that himself, by citing
old information which has been superceded by more recent research, for
example. The fact that he parrots much of the same misinformation that
the cult does, makes his public distancing from the lying cult of
$cientology just a wee bit hard to believe.

That he's a hired gun for such things as the Ritalin lawsuit makes me
suspicious of his views; that they contradict both my own experience and
scientific research makes me doubt them still more. That he persists,
when corrected, makes him a liar.

But I guess I'm not supposed to call a liar a liar anymore...

G03090103

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May 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/23/00
to
Chris Leithiser clei...@bc.cc.ca.us wrote:

>G03090103 wrote:

>> Chris Leithiser clei...@bc.cc.ca.us wrote:

>> And we all know he's full of sh*t, 'cause his wife was a (as Mark Probert
>would
>> write) $cientologi$t, right? What a perfect example of an ad hominem
>attack.

>> JG

>Why, yes, a perfect example of your using ad-hominem against Mark! :)
>
No, Chris, it isn't. Rather than debate fallacies, I'll just refer you (and
anyone else who might be remotely interested) to the Nizkor Project,
http://www.nizkor.org/features/fallacies .

I've not attacked Mark; he has, on numerous occasions, written "Scientologist"
with dollar signs in place of the esses. What you choose to infer is up to
you; I was simply pointing out (to anyone who might not be familiar with his
modus operandi) that Mr. Probert's reasoning is faulty; one's religious
affiliation alone doesn't automatically invalidate his/her assertions. Here,
from the site mentioned above, is a definition of (circumstantial) ad hominem:

1. Person A [e.g., Peter Breggin] makes claim X.
2. Person B [e.g., Mark Probert, et al.] makes an attack on A's circumstances.
3. Therefore X is false.

A Circumstantial ad Hominem is a fallacy because a person's interests and
circumstances have no bearing on the truth or falsity of the claim being made.
While a person's interests will provide them with motives to support certain
claims, the claims stand or fall on their own. It is also the case that a
person's circumstances (religion, political affiliation, etc.) do not affect
the truth or falsity of the claim. This is made quite clear by the following
example: "Bill claims that 1+1=2. But he is a Republican, so his claim is
false."

>Actually, both he and his wife, Ginger (who escaped from the cult) both
>have nasty things to say about it. Publicly. They're still very much
>in bed with people who think they're spiritually descended from seafood,
>because the money's good.

And this invalidates Breggin's views because???

JG

John

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May 23, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/23/00
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Chris Leithiser <clei...@bc.cc.ca.us> wrote in

>
> But I guess I'm not supposed to call a liar a liar anymore...

It tends to get my suspicions when people use that word-----basically they
tend to use the word for anyone who disagrees with their opinions. No
evidence is ever provided that the said person has actually lied.

>That he persists,
>when corrected, makes him a liar.

No doubt you can provide evidence for this.


John

Mark Probert

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May 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/24/00
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In article <8geur7$rkp$1...@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk>, "John"
<wh...@whaleto.freeserve.co.uk> writes:

None that you would accept. They contain facts.


Mark Probert

A vote for Pat Buchanan is a vote for America's First Fuhrer!

Mark Probert

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May 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/24/00
to
In article <392AF3B7...@bc.cc.ca.us>, Chris Leithiser
<clei...@bc.cc.ca.us> writes:

Much snippage...

>That he's a hired gun for such things as the Ritalin lawsuit makes me
>suspicious of his views; that they contradict both my own experience and

>scientific research makes me doubt them still more. That he persists,


>when corrected, makes him a liar.

I have my personal doubts about the hired gun theory. I have a suspicion that
he is a prime mover. The suit is just too-Breggin.

>But I guess I'm not supposed to call a liar a liar anymore...

Of course not. That is the exclusive technique of G4444444 and the rest of
them.

Mark Probert

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May 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/24/00
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In article <20000523133752...@ng-fk1.aol.com>, g030...@aol.com
(G03090103) writes:

>
>Chris Leithiser clei...@bc.cc.ca.us wrote:
>
>
>
>>John wrote:
>>>
>>> Ritalin Fraud http://www.ritalinfraud.com/
>
>>They got the name right, at least. If Breggin is involved, fraud can't
>>be far behind.
>

>And we all know he's full of sh*t, 'cause his wife was a (as Mark Probert
>would
>write) $cientologi$t, right? What a perfect example of an ad hominem attack.

One should know where someone is coming from. Wheni read Breggin for the first
time, I asked myself just how someone with his education could be so
intellectually dishonest. When I found that his wife was a former (can you ever
be "former", without joining Lisa McPherson?) member of the Kriminal Kult of
$cientilogy, it made sense.

In a perverse sort of way.

Dr. S.

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May 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/24/00
to
Whew! Thank you for the post. One may add (or is that "adhd," in child
psych lingo) the possible side effect of Ritalin-induced cancer, which
has been so thoroughly demonstrated in mice that a couple of years ago,
the US government sponsored a mailing warning of this to over 100,000
US pediatricians. No such mailing was made to patients' families.

"When I can't stops me fiddlin' I just takes me Ritalin; I'm poppin'
and sailin', man!" (Bart Simpson)

More information at http://doctoryourself.com/adhd.html
http://doctoryourself.com/hoffer_psychosis.html
http://doctoryourself.com/hoffer_paradigm.html

--
Over 120 articles (indexed by topic, or keyword with an on-site
search engine) plus hundreds of scientific references on nutritional
therapeutics are posted at http://doctoryourself.com Links to other
clinical nutrition and alternative medicine sites are provided.


In article <8gd8ah$tkr$1...@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk>,


Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

Joe Parsons

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May 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/24/00
to
On Wed, 24 May 2000 12:52:46 GMT, Dr. S. <drs...@juno.com> wrote:

>Whew! Thank you for the post. One may add (or is that "adhd," in child
>psych lingo) the possible side effect of Ritalin-induced cancer, which
>has been so thoroughly demonstrated in mice that a couple of years ago,

Oh, you mean the 1995 NIH study?

It's at http://ntp-server.niehs.nih.gov/htdocs/LT-studies/tr439.html.

The FDA letter you refer to is at
Http://www.fda.gov//bbs/topics/ANSWERS/ANS00705.html.

>the US government sponsored a mailing warning of this to over 100,000
>US pediatricians. No such mailing was made to patients' families.

Do you suppose the fact that the causative link is so tenuous might have
something to do with it? Or the fact that the rare, non-fatal liver tumors have
occurred *only* in lab rodents that develop tumors readily? Or perhaps that
there have been no cancers in humans related to the use of methylphenidate?

Joe Parsons


==========================================================
Frequently Asked Questions for alt.support.attn-deficit
and other resources for dealing with attention deficit
disorder are at http://www.cyber-mall.com/asad/

Chris Leithiser

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May 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/24/00
to
"Dr. S." wrote:
>
> Whew! Thank you for the post. One may add (or is that "adhd," in child
> psych lingo) the possible side effect of Ritalin-induced cancer, which
> has been so thoroughly demonstrated in mice that a couple of years ago,
> the US government sponsored a mailing warning of this to over 100,000
> US pediatricians. No such mailing was made to patients' families.
>

The FDA also noted that the kind of liver tumor found in mice is
extremely rare in people, and its occurrence in recent years has not
increased despite an increase in the use of Ritalin.

They called the research results a "weak signal." By contrast,
secondhand smoke is a "strong signal" indicator as a cause of
cancer...and the government didn't send a warning to parents either.

Chris Leithiser

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May 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/24/00
to
John wrote:
>

> >That he persists,
> >when corrected, makes him a liar.
>

> No doubt you can provide evidence for this.
>

> John

Mark has been too modest. I cannot improve on this classic:

http://x69.deja.com/[ST_rn=ps]/getdoc.xp?AN=611512829&CONTEXT=959188096.832176159&hitnum=18

Kurt Ullman

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May 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/24/00
to
In article <392C087C...@bc.cc.ca.us>, Chris Leithiser
<clei...@bc.cc.ca.us> wrote:

>They called the research results a "weak signal." By contrast,
>secondhand smoke is a "strong signal" indicator as a cause of
>cancer...and the government didn't send a warning to parents either.

Yeah, but second hand smoke did not become a strong signal before the feds
cooked the books. They were caught after their big pronouncement a few years
ago of changing the confidence interval to 90%. It wasn't significant at 95%
(which is the CI used by almost all of the studies that the prnouncement was
based on.)


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
"People everywhere confuse what they read in the newspapers with news."
-A.J. Liebling

CBI

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May 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/24/00
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That's why I never, ever, give Ritalin to rodents. Just to be safe.

--
CBI, M.D.

Please note: It is impossible to accurately diagnose medical problems
without seeing the patient and reviewing the entire history. These posts are
intended to be helpful and informative. Always check with your doctor before
following any advice given.

Medicine Tools

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May 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/24/00
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Don't you feel cute , "Doctor" ?
CBI <c_ish...@mindspring.com> wrote in message
news:8ghm3a$iik$1...@slb7.atl.mindspring.net...

Joe Parsons

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May 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/24/00
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On Wed, 24 May 2000 18:49:51 -0400, "CBI" <c_ish...@mindspring.com> wrote:

>That's why I never, ever, give Ritalin to rodents. Just to be safe.

You are truly a compassionate person.

Chris Leithiser

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May 24, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/24/00
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CBI wrote:
>
> That's why I never, ever, give Ritalin to rodents. Just to be safe.
>
Then how do you get them to sit still in class? Threaten to cut off
their tails with a carving knife?

Steven Fochi

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May 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/25/00
to
Here's some info on Ritalin from the drug companies for anyone who wants
more info.

It's not a nice one and one i wouldn't give to my child, especially if the
child is young as they don't know how it affects a young child yet.


Love and Light
Steven

=====================================

RITALIN

(Novartis)


Composition:

Methylphenidate hydrochloride (alpha-Phenyl-2-piperidineacetic acid methyl
ester hydrochloride).

Excipients: lactose, calcium phosphate, gelatin, magnesium stearate,
talc-purified, starch-wheat.


Pharmacology:

Ritalin is a central nervous stimulant. Its mode of action in man is not
completely understood, but Ritalin presumably exerts its
stimulant effect by activating the brainstem arousal system and cortex.

There is neither specific evidence which clearly establishes the mechanism
whereby Ritalin produces its mental and behavioural
effects in children, nor conclusive evidence as to how these effects relate
to the condition of the central nervous system.


Pharmacokinetics:

Following oral administration of Ritalin, the active substance,
methylphenidate hydrochloride, is rapidly and almost completely
absorbed from the tablets. Owing to extensive first-pass metabolism, its
systemic availability amounts to only 30% (11-51%) of the
dose. Ingestion together with food accelerates its absorption, but has no
influence on the amount absorbed. Peak plasma
concentrations of approx. 40 nmol/litre (11 ng/mL) are attained, on the
average, 2 hours after administration of 0.30 mg/kg. The
peak plasma concentrations, however, vary markedly from one person to
another. The area under the plasma concentration curve
(AUC), as well as the peak plasma concentration, are proportional to the
size of the dose administered.

In the blood, methylphenidate and its metabolites become distributed in the
plasma (57%) and the erythrocytes (43%).
Methylphenidate and its metabolites have low plasma protein-binding
(approximately 15%). The apparent volume of distribution has
been calculated at 13.1 litres/kg.

Methylphenidate is eliminated from the plasma with a mean half-life of 2 to
3 hours, and the calculated mean systemic clearance
is 4 to 10 litres/h/kg. Within 48 to 96 hours 78 to 97% of the dose
administered is excreted in the urine and 1 to 3% in the faeces
in the form of metabolites. Unchanged methylphenidate appears in the urine
only in small quantities (< 1%). The bulk of the dose
is excreted in the urine as 2-phenyl-2-piperidyl acetic acid (PPAA, 60-86%).
Peak plasma concentrations of PPAA are attained
about 2 hours after administration of methylphenidate and are 30 to 50 times
higher than those of the unchanged substance. The
half-life of PPAA is roughly twice as long as that of methylphenidate.

There are no apparent differences in the pharmacokinetic behaviour of
methylphenidate in hyperactive children and normal adults.


Indications:


Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): ADHD was previously known
as attention-deficit disorder. Other terms being used
to describe this behavioural syndrome include: minimal brain dysfunction in
children, hyperkinetic child syndrome, minimal brain
damage, minimal cerebral dysfunction, minor cerebral dysfunction, and
psycho-organic syndrome of children.

Ritalin is indicated as part of a comprehensive treatment programme which
typically includes other remedial measures
(psychological, educational, social) for achieving a beneficial effect in
children with a behavioural syndrome characterised by the
following group of developmentally inappropriate symptoms: moderate to
severe distractibility, short attention span, hyperactivity
(not always present) and impulsivity. The diagnosis of this syndrome should
not be made when these symptoms are only of recent
origin. Non-localising (soft) neurological signs, emotional lability,
learning disability, and an abnormal EEG may or may not be
present, and a diagnosis of central nervous system dysfunction may or may
not be warranted.

Special diagnostic considerations for ADHD: The aetiology of this syndrome
is unknown, and there is no single diagnostic test.
Adequate diagnosis requires the use, not only of medical but also of
psychological, educational, and social resources.
Characteristics commonly reported include: chronic history of short
attention span, distractibility, emotional lability, impulsivity,
moderate to severe hyperactivity, minor neurological signs and an abnormal
EEG. Learning may or may not be impaired. The
diagnosis must be based upon a complete history and evaluation of the child
and not solely on the presence of one or more of
these characteristics.

Drug treatment is not indicated for all children with this syndrome.
Stimulants are not intended for use in children who exhibit
symptoms secondary to environmental factors (e.g. child abuse in particular)
or primary psychiatric disorders. Appropriate
educational placement is essential and psychosocial intervention is
generally necessary. When remedial measures alone are
insufficient, the decision to prescribe stimulant medication will depend
upon the physician's assessment of the chronicity and
severity of the child's symptoms.

Narcolepsy: The symptoms include daytime sleepiness, inappropriate sleep
episodes, and rapidly occurring loss of voluntary
muscle tone. Effective for symptoms of sleepiness but not for loss of
voluntary muscle tone.


Contra-indications:

Anxiety and tension states, agitation, tics, tics in siblings, a family
history or diagnosis of Tourette's syndrome, glaucoma,
hyperthyroidism, cardiac arrhythmia, severe angina pectoris, known
hypersensitivity to methylphenidate or to any component of
the formulation.


Precautions and Warnings:

Ritalin should not be used in children under 6 years of age, since safety
and efficacy in this age group have not been established.

Ritalin should not be used as treatment for severe depression of either
exogenous or endogenous origin. In psychotic patients,
administration of Ritalin may exacerbate symptoms of behavioural disturbance
and thought disorder. Ritalin should not be
employed for the prevention or treatment of normal fatigue states.

There is some clinical evidence that Ritalin may lower the convulsion
threshold in patients with a history of seizures, with prior
EEG abnormalities in the absence of seizures and rarely, in the absence of a
history of seizures and no prior EEG evidence of
seizures. Safe concomitant use of anticonvulsants and Ritalin has not been
established. In the presence of seizures, the drug
should be discontinued.

As with other stimulants, the possibility of habituation or abuse must be
considered, particularly in emotionally unstable patients
and those with a history of drug dependence or alcoholism, because such
patients may increase the dose on their own initiative.

Chronic abuse of Ritalin can lead to marked tolerance and psychic dependence
with varying degrees of abnormal behaviour. Frank
psychotic episodes may occur, especially in response to parenteral abuse.
Ritalin abuse or dependence does not appear to be a
problem in adolescents or adults who were treated with Ritalin for ADHD as
children.

Careful supervision is required during drug withdrawal, since depression as
well as the effects of chronic over-activity can be
unmasked. Long-term follow-up may be needed for some patients.

Treatment with Ritalin is not indicated in all cases of ADHD and should be
considered only in the light of the complete history and
evaluation of the child. The decision to prescribe Ritalin should depend on
the physician's assessment of the chronicity and
severity of the child's symptoms and their appropriateness to his or her
age. Prescription should not depend solely on the
presence of isolated behavioural characteristics. When the symptoms are
associated with acute stress reactions, treatment with
Ritalin is usually not indicated.

The retardation of growth referred to under Adverse Reactions below is
usually followed by catch-up growth when the medication
is discontinued. In order to minimise such complications, drug-free periods
over weekends, school holidays and long vacations are
advocated by some specialists.

Ritalin should be used cautiously in patients with hypertension. Blood
pressure should be monitored at appropriate intervals in all
patients taking Ritalin, especially in those with hypertension.

Data on safety and efficacy of long-term use of Ritalin are not complete.
Therefore, patients requiring long-term therapy should be
carefully monitored.

Periodic complete blood counts, differential, and platelet counts are
advisable during prolonged therapy.

Ritalin may affect the patient's reactions and adversely influence his or
her ability to drive and use machines.

Alcohol may exacerbate the CNS adverse reactions of psychoactive drugs,
including Ritalin. Therefore, it is advisable for patients
to abstain from alcohol during treatment.

Medicines should be kept out of the reach of children.


Use during Pregnancy and Lactation:

As a general rule no drugs should be taken during the first 3 months of
pregnancy, and the benefits and risks of taking drugs
should be carefully considered throughout the whole of the pregnancy.

There is no experience upon which to judge the safety of Ritalin in human
pregnancy, nor is there evidence from animal work that it
is free from either teratogenic potential or other adverse effects on the
embryo and/or foetus relevant to the safety assessment of
the product. Use of Ritalin should be avoided during pregnancy unless, in
the opinion of the physician, there is no safer alternative.

It is not known whether or not the active ingredient of Ritalin and/or its
metabolites pass into breast milk. For safety reasons
mothers taking Ritalin should refrain from breast-feeding their infants.


Adverse Reactions:


Central and peripheral nervous system: Nervousness, insomnia and anorexia
are the most common adverse reactions occurring at
the beginning of the treatment and are usually controlled by reducing the
dosage and omitting the drug in the afternoon or evening.

Headache, drowsiness, dizziness, depressed mood, irritability, dyskinesia,
difficulties in accommodation, and blurring of vision
may also occur. Isolated cases of hyperactivity, convulsions, muscle cramps,
cerebral arteritis and/or occlusion, choreo-athetoid
movements, tics, or exacerbation of pre-existing tics, and Tourette's
syndrome have been reported. Isolated cases of toxic
psychosis (some with visual and tactile hallucinations) have been reported,
which subsided when Ritalin was discontinued. Very
rare reports of poorly documented neuroleptic malignant syndrome have been
received.

Gastrointestinal tract: Abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting may occur and
may be alleviated by concomitant food intake; dry
mouth; very rare reports of abnormal liver function, ranging from
transaminase elevation to hepatic coma.

Cardiovascular system: Tachycardia, palpitation, arrhythmia, changes in
blood pressure and heart rate (usually an increase),
angina pectoris.

Skin and/or hypersensitivity reactions: Rash, pruritus, urticaria, fever,
arthralgia, alopecia. Isolated cases of thrombocytopenic
purpura, of exfoliative dermatitis, and of erythema multiforme have been
reported.

Blood: Isolated cases of leucopenia, thrombocytopenia, and anaemia have been
reported.

Other adverse reactions: Moderate reduction in weight gain and minor
retardation of growth in stature may occur in children during
prolonged therapy.


Interactions:

Ritalin should be used cautiously with pressor agents and MAO inhibitors.
Human pharmacological studies have shown that Ritalin
may inhibit the metabolism of coumarin anticoagulants, anticonvulsants
(phenobarbitone, primidone, phenytoin), phenylbutazone,
and tricyclic antidepressants (imipramine, desipramine). Reduction in the
dosage of these drugs may be required when they are
given concomitantly with Ritalin.

In occasional circumstances where guanethidine and Ritalin are used
together, any antihypertensive effect of the former may be
attenuated.


Dosage and Administration:

Treatment should only be initiated by specialist physicians with experience
in the use of the drug.

The dosage must be adapted to individual case. The rate of absorption and,
therefore, onset of action is faster when the drug is
taken with food. Dosage should, therefore, be standardised in relation to
food to ensure consistency of effect.

Adults: Administer in divided doses 2 or 3 times daily. The average dose is
20 to 30 mg daily. Some patients may require 40 to 60
mg daily. In others, 10 to 15 mg daily will be adequate. Patients who are
unable to sleep if Ritalin is taken late in the day should
take the last dose before 6pm.

Dosing for each patient requires titration to control symptoms. Single doses
greater than 20 mg are associated with
sympathomimetic side-effects. Therefore, the average single dose should be
less than 20 mg. A maximum total dose of 60 mg/day
may be required.

Doses should be administered 1-2 hours before the maximum effect is
required.

Children (6 years and over): Treatment with Ritalin should be initiated in
small doses, with gradual weekly increments. Daily
dosage should not exceed 60 mg. Timing of the drug's administration should
be aimed at coinciding with periods of greatest
academic, behavioural, or social difficulties for the patient.

Start with 5 mg once or twice daily (e.g. at breakfast and at lunch) with
gradual increments of 5 or 10 mg weekly. The total daily
dosage should be administered in divided doses.

If improvement of symptoms is not observed after appropriate dosage
adjustment over a one-month period, the drug should be
discontinued.

In some children with ADHD, sleeplessness may occur as the effect of the
drug wears off. On rare occasions, an additional dose
at about 8.00 p.m. may help; a trial dose may help to clarify the issue in
an individual case, if the symptom warrants treatment.

Ritalin should be discontinued periodically (e.g. over weekends, school
holidays and long vacation) to assess the child's condition.
Improvement may be sustained when the drug is either temporarily or
permanently discontinued. Drug treatment should not and
need not, be indefinite and usually may be discontinued during or after
puberty.


Overdosage:

Signs and symptoms of acute overdosage, resulting principally from
overstimulation of the central nervous system and from
excessive sympathomimetic effects, may include the following:

vomiting, agitation, tremors, hyperreflexia, muscle twitching, convulsions
(may be followed by coma), euphoria, confusion,
hallucinations, delirium, sweating, flushing, headache, hyperpyrexia,
tachycardia, palpitation, cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension,
mydriasis, and dryness of mucous membranes.

Treatment consists of appropriate supportive measures. The patient must be
protected against self-injury and against external
stimuli that would aggravate overstimulation already present. If the signs
and symptoms are not too severe and the patient is
conscious, further absorption may be limited by administration of activated
charcoal. If gastric lavage is undertaken, and in cases
of marked agitation, intravenous doses of diazepam or haloperidol should be
given. Hypertension may be controlled by
alpha-adrenergic blocking agents or intravenous sodium nitroprusside.

Intensive care must be provided to maintain adequate circulation and
respiratory exchange; external cooling procedures may be
required for hyperpyrexia.

Efficacy of peritoneal dialysis or extracorporeal haemodialysis for
overdosage of Ritalin has not been established.


Pack:

Tablets 10 mg (white, scored, marked AB, CG on reverse): 100's

All States and A.C.T.-S.8

August 1998

rtl030898i

=======================================
RITALIN - CMI

(Novartis)


CONSUMER MEDICINE INFORMATION

What is in this leaflet


This leaflet answers some common questions about Ritalin.

It does not contain all the available information.

It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist.

All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of
you or your child taking Ritalin against the benefits
they expect it will have.

If you have any concerns about taking this medicine, ask your doctor or
pharmacist.

Keep this leaflet with the medicine.

You may need to read it again.


What Ritalin is used for


Ritalin is used to treat a behavioural disorder called Attention Deficit
Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), although not all people with
this disorder are hyperactive.

About 3% of children suffer from ADHD. It makes them unable to sit still or
concentrate on tasks for any length of time. They may
have trouble learning and doing school work. They frequently become
difficult to manage, both in school and at home.

Ritalin is a central nervous system stimulant. It is thought to work by
regulating specific chemicals in the brain which affect
behaviour. It helps to focus attention, shut out distraction and allows
impulsive people to think before they act. If successful, it will
enhance an inattentive person's natural ability.

Ritalin is part of a treatment program which usually includes psychological,
educational and social therapy.

Ritalin is also used to treat narcolepsy, a sleep-attack disorder.

People with narcolepsy have recurring attacks of irresistible day-time
sleepiness in spite of having enough sleep at night.
Narcolepsy can be diagnosed by a doctor by recording wake-sleep patterns.

Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Ritalin has been
prescribed for you.

Your doctor may have prescribed it for another reason.

This medicine is only available with a doctor's prescription and your doctor
has special permission to prescribe it.


Before you take Ritalin


When you must not take it

- Do not take Ritalin if you have an allergy to:

methylphenidate (the active ingredient in Ritalin)

any of the other ingredients listed at the end of this leaflet

Some of the symptoms of an allergic reaction may include rash, itching or
hives on the skin; swelling of the face, lips, tongue or
other parts of the body; shortness of breath, wheezing or troubled
breathing.

- Do not take Ritalin if you have any of the following medical conditions:

periods of severe anxiety, tension or agitation

tics (muscle twitching which is usually in the face or shoulders) or if
your brothers or sisters have tics

Tourettes's syndrome or you have a family history of this disorder

glaucoma (increased pressure in the eye)

an overactive thyroid

an irregular heartbeat

severe angina (chest pain)

If you are not sure whether any of the above medical conditions apply to
you, check with your doctor.

- Do not take Ritalin after the expiry date printed on the pack.

If you take this medicine after the expiry date has passed, it may not work
as well as it should.

- Do not take Ritalin if the packaging is torn or shows signs of tampering.

In that case, return it to your pharmacist.

- Do not give this medicine to children under 6 years of age.

There is not enough information to recommend its use in children under 6
years old.

Before you start to take it

- Tell your doctor if you are allergic to any other medicines, foods, dyes
or preservatives.

Your doctor will want to know if you are prone to allergies.

- Tell your doctor if you have any of the following medical conditions:

severe depression or other mental illness

epilepsy (seizures or fits)

high blood pressure

alcoholism

drug dependence

Your doctor may want to take special precautions if you have any of these
conditions.

- Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breast feeding. Ask your doctor
about the risks and benefits of taking Ritalin in this case.

Ritalin may affect your developing baby if you take it while you are
pregnant. It is not known if the active ingredient in Ritalin
passes into the breast milk. Breast feeding is not recommended.

If you have not told your doctor about any of these things, tell him/her
before you take Ritalin.

Taking other medicines

- Tell your doctor if you are taking any other medicines, including
medicines that you buy without a prescription from a pharmacy,
supermarket or health food shop.

Other medicines and Ritalin may interfere with each other. Some of these
medicines include:

medicines that increase blood pressure

warfarin, a medicine used to prevent blood clots

medicines for epilepsy (fits)

medicines for depression, such as tricyclic antidepressants and MAO
inhibitors

phenylbutazone

guanethidine

You may need to take different amounts of your medicines or you may need to
take different medicines.

Your doctor and pharmacist have more information on medicines to be careful
with or avoid while taking Ritalin.


How to take Ritalin


Follow the directions given to you by your doctor and pharmacist carefully.

These directions may differ from the information contained in this leaflet.

If you do not understand the instructions on the label, ask your doctor or
pharmacist for help.

How much to take

Children: the usual starting dose is 5 mg (half a tablet) once or twice each
day. If necessary, the dose can be increased by 5 or 10
mg each week up to a maximum of 60 mg (6 tablets) each day.

Adults: the usual dose is 20 to 30 mg (2-3 tablets) each day but some people
may need more or less than that. The maximum
dose is 60 mg (6 tablets) each day.

When to take it

Take the tablets in 2 or 3 doses over the day unless your doctor tells you
otherwise.

Each dose is usually taken 1 or 2 hours before the greatest effect is
needed. For example, a child may take a dose at 7.00 a.m.
so that improved behaviour begins when school starts. If the child tends to
misbehave during the lunchtime play period, the next
dose can be taken before the lunch break.

If you find that this medicine keeps you from sleeping, talk to your doctor
about the best time to take the last dose of the day.

How to take it

Take the tablets with a full glass of water or other liquid. If the tablets
upset your stomach, you can take them with food.

Always take the tablets in the same way (eg. always with food or always
without food).

That way the effect will always be the same.

If the dose is one-half tablet, there is a break-line on the tablet to help
you cut it. You can buy a tablet cutter from your pharmacist
to make sure the dose is accurate.

How long to take it

Continue taking Ritalin for as long as your doctor tells you to.

Ritalin helps to control your symptoms but it does not cure your condition.
Your doctor will check your progress to make sure the
medicine is working and will discuss with you how long your treatment should
continue. If you are unsure, talk to your doctor.

During treatment for ADHD, Ritalin is usually stopped every so often (eg.
over weekends, school holidays and long vacation) to see
whether it is still needed. Breaks from treatment also help to prevent a
slow-down in growth that sometimes happens when
children take Ritalin for a long time.

If you forget to take it

Take the dose as soon as you remember. Then make sure to wait the same
amount of time as usual before you take the next
dose.

For example, if there are usually 4 hours between doses, wait 4 hours before
taking the next dose and so on for the rest of that
day. On the next day go back to your usual times.

Do not take a double dose to make up for the one that you missed.

If you have trouble remembering when to take your medicine, ask your
pharmacist for some hints.

If you take too much (Overdose)

Immediately telephone your doctor or Poisons Information Centre (telephone
13 11 26) for advice, or go to accident and emergency
at your nearest hospital if you think that you or anyone else may have taken
too much Ritalin. Do this even if there are no signs of
discomfort or poisoning.

Keep the telephone numbers for these places handy.

Symptoms of an overdose may include vomiting, agitation, headache, tremors,
muscle twitching, irregular heart beat, flushing,
fever, sweating, dilated pupils, breathing problems, confusion and seizures.


While you are taking Ritalin


Things you must do

- Take Ritalin exactly as your doctor has prescribed.

Like all stimulants, Ritalin may become habit-forming and can be abused by
some people. If you take it correctly as instructed by
your doctor, abuse or dependence should not be a problem, either now or
later in life.

Be sure to keep all of your doctor's appointments so that your progress can
be checked.

Your doctor will want to check your blood pressure and do blood tests from
time to time to prevent unwanted side effects from
happening.

- If you become pregnant while taking Ritalin, tell your doctor.

Your doctor can discuss with you the risks and benefits of taking it while
you are pregnant.

- If you are about to be started on any new medicine, remind your doctor and
pharmacist that you are taking Ritalin.

- Tell any other doctor, dentist or pharmacist who treats you that you are
taking Ritalin.

Things you must not do

- Do not stop your treatment without first checking with your doctor.

If you suddenly stop taking this medicine, your condition may reappear or
you may get unwanted effects such as depression. To
prevent this, your doctor may want to gradually reduce the amount of
medicine you take each day before stopping it completely.

- Do not take Ritalin to treat any other complaints unless your doctor tells
you to.

- Do not give this medicine to anyone else, even if their symptoms seem to
be similar to yours.

Things to be careful of

- Be careful driving, operating machinery or doing jobs that require you to
be alert while you are taking Ritalin until you know how it
affects you.

This medicine may cause dizziness, drowsiness or blurred vision in some
people. If you have any of these symptoms, do not drive
or do anything else that could be dangerous.

- Be careful when drinking alcohol while you are taking Ritalin.

Drinking alcohol during treatment with Ritalin is not recommended because
alcohol can worsen some of the unwanted effects of
Ritalin such as dizziness and drowsiness.


Side effects


Tell your doctor or pharmacist as soon as possible if you do not feel well
while you are taking Ritalin.

All medicines can have side effects. Sometimes they are serious, most of the
time they are not. You may need medical treatment
if you get some of the side effects.

Do not be alarmed by this list of possible side effects. You may not
experience any of them.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist to answer any questions you may have.

Tell your doctor if you notice any of the following side effects and they
worry you:

nausea (feeling sick), vomiting or abdominal pain

loss of appetite, which can lead to loss of weight or slower growth in
children

feeling nervous or unable to sleep

dry mouth

headache

drowsiness

dizziness

mood changes such as depression or irritability

blurred vision or problems focussing your eyes

muscle cramps

hair loss

Stomach upset, loss of appetite and difficulty sleeping are common,
especially at the start of treatment. Your doctor can usually
help to reduce these symptoms by lowering the dose of Ritalin or changing
the times when the tablets are taken.

Tell your doctor immediately if you notice any of the following:

signs of allergy such as swelling of the face, lips or tongue; shortness of
breath, wheezing or troubled breathing

rash, itching, red blotches, blisters or pealing of the skin

sudden increase in body temperature, sweating, fast heart beat, muscle
stiffness and fluctuating blood pressure, which may
lead to coma

constant "flu-like" symptoms such as chills, fever, sore throat, swollen
glands, aching muscles or joints

unusual bleeding or bruising

unusual tiredness, shortness of breath when exercising, dizziness, pale
skin

uncontrollable twitching, jerking or writhing movements

seizures (fits)

pain or tightness in the chest

fast or irregular heart beat, changes in blood pressure

yellow colour to the skin or eyes, dark coloured urine or light coloured
bowel motions

confusion or hallucinations (seeing or feeling things that are not really
there)

severe or persistent headache

These side effects may be serious. You may need urgent medical attention.

Tell your doctor if you notice anything else that is making you feel unwell.

Other side effects not listed above may happen in some people.


After taking Ritalin


Storage

Keep your tablets in the original container until it is time to take them.

Store the tablets in a cool dry place.

Do not store Ritalin or any other medicine in the bathroom or near a sink.

Do not leave it in the car or on window sills.

Heat and dampness can destroy some medicines. Ritalin will keep well if it
is cool and dry.

Keep this medicine where children cannot reach it.

A locked cupboard at least one-and-a-half metres above the ground is a good
place to store medicines.

Disposal

If your doctor tells you to stop taking Ritalin or the tablets have passed
their expiry date, ask your pharmacist what to do with any
that are left over.


Product description


What it looks like

Ritalin 10 mg: round white tablet, marked CG on one side and AB with a
break-line on the other; packs of 100 tablets.

Ingredients

Ritalin tablets contain 10 mg of methylphenidate hydrochloride as the active
ingredient.

They also contain:

lactose

calcium phosphate

gelatin

magnesium stearate

talc-purified

starch-wheat

Australian Registration Number: Ritalin 10 mg tablet AUST R 11052


Sponsor


Ritalin is supplied in Australia by:

NOVARTIS Pharmaceuticals Australia Pty Limited

ACN 004 244 160

54 Waterloo Road

North Ryde NSW 2113

Telephone 1-800-671-203

This leaflet was prepared in August 1998

rtl088c.cur based on PI (rtl088i.cur)

"John" <wh...@whaleto.freeserve.co.uk> wrote in message
news:8gd8ah$tkr$1...@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk...

Dr. S.

unread,
May 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/25/00
to
I think the following statement by the FDA is sufficient to warrant
greatly increased caution with Ritalin: "FDA considers the results of
the studies a signal of a weak cancer-causing potential for this drug."

I sincerely appreciate your posting the links to both the Ritalin
toxicology study and the warning letter. Thank you.

My opinion on attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder is posted at
http://doctoryourself.com/adhd.html and
http://doctoryourself.com/nerves.html

The viewpoints of an M.D. with over 45 years experience as a
psychiatrist and researcher are posted at
http://doctoryourself.com/hoffer_paradigm.html
http://doctoryourself.com/hoffer_editorial.html
http://doctoryourself.com/hoffer_JOM.html
http://doctoryourself.com/hoffer_psychosis.html

Personal emails on this subject are welcome. I have no financial
connection to the supplement industry, incidently.

--
Over 120 articles (indexed by topic, or keyword with an on-site
search engine) plus hundreds of scientific references on nutritional
therapeutics are posted at http://doctoryourself.com Links to other
clinical nutrition and alternative medicine sites are provided.

In article <q72ois8tg1k0q5bsi...@4ax.com>,


j...@cyber-mall.com wrote:
> On Wed, 24 May 2000 12:52:46 GMT, Dr. S. <drs...@juno.com> wrote:
>

> >Whew! Thank you for the post. One may add (or is that "adhd," in
child
> >psych lingo) the possible side effect of Ritalin-induced cancer,
which
> >has been so thoroughly demonstrated in mice that a couple of years
ago,
>

> Oh, you mean the 1995 NIH study?
>
> It's at http://ntp-server.niehs.nih.gov/htdocs/LT-studies/tr439.html.
>
> The FDA letter you refer to is at
> Http://www.fda.gov//bbs/topics/ANSWERS/ANS00705.html.
>

> >the US government sponsored a mailing warning of this to over 100,000
> >US pediatricians. No such mailing was made to patients' families.
>

> Do you suppose the fact that the causative link is so tenuous might
have
> something to do with it? Or the fact that the rare, non-fatal liver
tumors have
> occurred *only* in lab rodents that develop tumors readily? Or
perhaps that
> there have been no cancers in humans related to the use of
methylphenidate?
>

> Joe Parsons
>
> ==========================================================
> Frequently Asked Questions for alt.support.attn-deficit
> and other resources for dealing with attention deficit
> disorder are at http://www.cyber-mall.com/asad/
>

--

Dr. S.

unread,
May 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/25/00
to
There is an old *Shoe* cartoon where the overweight, cigar-smoking
Perfesser is sitting at a diner counter and is told to eat his carrotts
because it's been shown that they prevent cancer in rats. His response
is, "Why would I want to prevent cancer in rats?"

All charm aside, I think the small but demonstrated carcingenic
potential of Ritalin deserves increased in caution, and more
consideration of safer alternatives.

My opinion on alternatives for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder

Personal emails on this subject are welcome. I have no financial
connection to the supplement industry, incidently.

--


Over 120 articles (indexed by topic, or keyword with an on-site
search engine) plus hundreds of scientific references on nutritional
therapeutics are posted at http://doctoryourself.com Links to other
clinical nutrition and alternative medicine sites are provided.

In article <8ghm3a$iik$1...@slb7.atl.mindspring.net>,


"CBI" <c_ish...@mindspring.com> wrote:
> That's why I never, ever, give Ritalin to rodents. Just to be safe.
>

> --
> CBI, M.D.
>
> Please note: It is impossible to accurately diagnose medical problems
> without seeing the patient and reviewing the entire history. These
posts are
> intended to be helpful and informative. Always check with your doctor
before
> following any advice given.
>

Dr. S.

unread,
May 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/25/00
to
I doubt if two wrongs will ever make a right. To even casually compare
the dangers of second-hand smoke with those of first-hand Ritalin
consumption by 2 million children a day confirms, to me, that the
safety issue is a real one. The government of the people, for the
people should be woken up by the people.

Additional viewpoint posted at:

--


Over 120 articles (indexed by topic, or keyword with an on-site
search engine) plus hundreds of scientific references on nutritional
therapeutics are posted at http://doctoryourself.com Links to other
clinical nutrition and alternative medicine sites are provided.

In article <392C087C...@bc.cc.ca.us>,
Chris Leithiser <clei...@bc.cc.ca.us> wrote:


> "Dr. S." wrote:
> >
> > Whew! Thank you for the post. One may add (or is that "adhd," in
child
> > psych lingo) the possible side effect of Ritalin-induced cancer,
which
> > has been so thoroughly demonstrated in mice that a couple of years
ago,
> > the US government sponsored a mailing warning of this to over
100,000
> > US pediatricians. No such mailing was made to patients' families.
> >
>

> The FDA also noted that the kind of liver tumor found in mice is
> extremely rare in people, and its occurrence in recent years has not
> increased despite an increase in the use of Ritalin.
>

> They called the research results a "weak signal." By contrast,
> secondhand smoke is a "strong signal" indicator as a cause of
> cancer...and the government didn't send a warning to parents either.
>

Dr. S.

unread,
May 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/25/00
to
If I had a 90% confidence level in anything, I'd probably start it
today.

However, I think that a reevaluation of the studies you mentioned was
done and achieved a higher confidence level. May I suggest a look at
or email to
http://www.smokefreeair.org or smok...@usa.net for confirmation
and additional information?

(Personal emails on this subject are welcome, especially if I do not
respond to postings promptly enough.)

--
Over 120 articles (indexed by topic, or keyword with an on-site
search engine) plus hundreds of scientific references on nutritional
therapeutics are posted at http://doctoryourself.com Links to other
clinical nutrition and alternative medicine sites are provided.


In article <NrYW4.32231$S31.6...@newsread2.prod.itd.earthlink.net>,


kurtu...@yahoo.com (Kurt Ullman) wrote:
> In article <392C087C...@bc.cc.ca.us>, Chris Leithiser
> <clei...@bc.cc.ca.us> wrote:
>
> >They called the research results a "weak signal." By contrast,
> >secondhand smoke is a "strong signal" indicator as a cause of
> >cancer...and the government didn't send a warning to parents either.
>

> Yeah, but second hand smoke did not become a strong signal before the
feds
> cooked the books. They were caught after their big pronouncement a
few years
> ago of changing the confidence interval to 90%. It wasn't significant
at 95%
> (which is the CI used by almost all of the studies that the
prnouncement was
> based on.)
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
-------
> "People everywhere confuse what they read in the newspapers
with news."
> -A.J. Liebling
>

Sent via Deja.com http://www.deja.com/
Before you buy.

Dr. S.

unread,
May 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/25/00
to
Thank you. Any bets on how many parents have seen, let alone actually
read, the full text of Ritalin's contraindications and side effects?

My opinion on attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder is posted at

The viewpoints of an M.D. with over 45 years experience as a
psychiatrist and researcher are posted at

Personal emails on this subject are welcome. I have no financial


connection to the supplement industry, incidently.

--


Over 120 articles (indexed by topic, or keyword with an on-site
search engine) plus hundreds of scientific references on nutritional
therapeutics are posted at http://doctoryourself.com Links to other
clinical nutrition and alternative medicine sites are provided.


--
Over 120 articles (indexed by topic, or keyword with an on-site
search engine) plus hundreds of scientific references on nutritional
therapeutics are posted at http://doctoryourself.com Links to other
clinical nutrition and alternative medicine sites are provided.

In article <4A2X4.5674$DH3....@news1.eburwd1.vic.optushome.com.au>,

--
Over 120 articles (indexed by topic, or keyword with an on-site
search engine) plus hundreds of scientific references on nutritional
therapeutics are posted at http://doctoryourself.com Links to other
clinical nutrition and alternative medicine sites are provided.

Chris Leithiser

unread,
May 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/25/00
to
Steven Fochi wrote:
>
> Here's some info on Ritalin from the drug companies for anyone who wants
> more info.
>
> It's not a nice one and one i wouldn't give to my child, especially if the
> child is young as they don't know how it affects a young child yet.


Very good. You can paste-and-copy out of the PDR. Can you _read_ the
PDR as well?

You might check out some of the known side-effects of, say, aspirin. Or
Tylenol.

I'm glad to know you wouldn't give Ritalin to your child. That's
something that should only be done under a doctor's prescription.

And by the way--it's safe and works very well in many cases of ADHD,
when administered under a doctor's prescription. Have a nice day.

Chris Leithiser

unread,
May 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/25/00
to
"Dr. S." wrote:
>
> Thank you. Any bets on how many parents have seen, let alone actually
> read, the full text of Ritalin's contraindications and side effects?
>

All have had the opportunity, since it's on the package insert available
at any pharmacy.

Actually read? Damned few, of course. Damned few read the warning
labels on the cough syrup they give, too. Or the Advil and Tylenol
bottles.

Good thing Ritalin's such a benign substance, then.

Medicine Tools

unread,
May 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/25/00
to
To bad some folks are so uninformed . Chris???
Chris Leithiser <clei...@bc.cc.ca.us> wrote in message
news:392D4C7A...@bc.cc.ca.us...

> "Dr. S." wrote:
> >
> > Thank you. Any bets on how many parents have seen, let alone actually
> > read, the full text of Ritalin's contraindications and side effects?
> >
>

Chris Leithiser

unread,
May 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/25/00
to
Medicine Tools wrote:
>
> To bad some folks are so uninformed . Chris???

You're so right. It is indeed bad that some folks are so
uninformed--more to the point, misinformed--about Ritalin and ADHD.

Much of the active misinformation comes straight from the cult of
$cientology, which believes a) that they are spiritually descended from
seafood, and b) that when they starved Lisa McPherson to death over 17
days at the Fort Harrison hotel in Clearwater, Florida, it was a
"protected religious practice."

They also believe that many of mankind's ills stem from an incident
75,000,000 years ago when Xenu the evil dictator nuked trillions of
souls on Earth's volcanoes, then tortured them by forcing the recaptured
souls to watch "Battlefield Earth*" again and again for three days until
they clumped together into "body thetans." These ghostly aliens must be
removed from your body, at a high cost per alien, before you can
exercise your godlike powers over Matter, Energy, Space, and Time.

Which is _another_ reason I don't trust them for pharmaceutical advice.
YMMV, right "Tools?"

*(OK, I was kidding about this part. BE hadn't even been filmed yet at
that time. Rest assured it will be one of the standard torture tools in
any _future_ galactic dictator's tool kit.)

Chris Leithiser

unread,
May 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/25/00
to
Medicine Tools wrote:
>
> SAFE?????????????

What, you thought he was out? Let's go to the videotape.

Yes, "safe." As in "millions of satisfied users, a track record of
decades, not a single reported case of addiction resulting from
medicinal use. "Safe" as in "recognized and controllable side-effects
much less than many other, commonly-prescribed medications.

To misquote Arthur Dent, "This is obviously some strange usage of the
word 'safe' that you weren't previously aware of?"

Medicine Tools

unread,
May 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/25/00
to
SAFE?????????????

Chris Leithiser <clei...@bc.cc.ca.us> wrote in message
news:392D480E...@bc.cc.ca.us...

> Steven Fochi wrote:
> >
> > Here's some info on Ritalin from the drug companies for anyone who wants
> > more info.
> >
> > It's not a nice one and one i wouldn't give to my child, especially if
the
> > child is young as they don't know how it affects a young child yet.
>
>

David Wright

unread,
May 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/25/00
to
>Here's some info on Ritalin from the drug companies for anyone who wants
>more info.
>
>It's not a nice one and one i wouldn't give to my child, especially if the
>child is young as they don't know how it affects a young child yet.

They *tell* you not to give it to children under 6. As for the rest
of it, I didn't see anything in there that screams "this stuff is
really dangerous!" All PDR entries look nasty if you read them in
isolation. Read some others and you'll start to get a feel for the
usual tone. Remember, that list of side-effects is a "cover-your-ass"
kind of thing, including every single bad thing that happened to the
testees, whether or not it was related to the drug.

Actually, I liked the tone of the PDR listing, with multiple
references to a need for a good diagnosis, emphasizing that Ritalin
isn't for every ADHD patient, and that it needn't be taken for life.

Maybe they're just covering themselves, but it was a responsible piece
of prose.

-- David Wright :: wright at ibnets.com :: Not a Spokesman for Anyone
These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
The Millennium actually begins on January 1, 2001
So Get Ready for a Second Round of Parties


Joe Parsons

unread,
May 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/25/00
to
On Thu, 25 May 2000 14:41:22 GMT, Dr. S. <drs...@juno.com> wrote:

>Thank you. Any bets on how many parents have seen, let alone actually
>read, the full text of Ritalin's contraindications and side effects?

Any bets on how many parents have read all the side effects and
contraindications for the medications frequently prescribed for other medical
conditions?

Any idea what the incidence of the less benign side effects actually is?

>My opinion on attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder is posted at
>http://doctoryourself.com/adhd.html and
>http://doctoryourself.com/nerves.html

You might want to update that a tad--much of the information there is over 10
years old and was debunked years ago. Growth suppression is one of them, and
the efficacy of the Feingold Diet.

Joe Parsons

>The viewpoints of an M.D. with over 45 years experience as a

==========================================================

David Wright

unread,
May 25, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/25/00
to
In article <8gjcbn$8vs$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, Dr. S. <drs...@juno.com> wrote:
>I think the following statement by the FDA is sufficient to warrant
>greatly increased caution with Ritalin: "FDA considers the results of
>the studies a signal of a weak cancer-causing potential for this drug."
>
>I sincerely appreciate your posting the links to both the Ritalin
>toxicology study and the warning letter. Thank you.

Did you bother to read them? There were two studies, one on mice and
one on rats. The mice showed a slight tendency towards tumors. Some
of the rats actually showed a *decline* in certain types with
increasing dosage. How about them apples, eh?

Also, the dosages being given were very large, probably at least 20
times as much as would be given to a child, with the adults getting
comparatively even less.

>The viewpoints of an M.D. with over 45 years experience as a

None of them even mention ADHD, but there I go nitpicking again.

John

unread,
May 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/26/00
to

CBI <c_ish...@mindspring.com> wrote in message
news:8ghm3a$iik$1...@slb7.atl.mindspring.net...
> That's why I never, ever, give Ritalin to rodents. Just to be safe.
>


At least the rats are safe from you.

John

Steven Fochi

unread,
May 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/26/00
to

> Very good. You can paste-and-copy out of the PDR. Can you _read_ the
> PDR as well?

Yep, i sure can cut and paste from the EAPP Guide & CMI Suppliment, and yes
i can read it too, it was very nice of you to ask.


>
> You might check out some of the known side-effects of, say, aspirin. Or
> Tylenol.

Maybe, but the discussion was about Ritalin and i published some info on it,
if your interested i can publish more info on other drugs. The only catch is
that the drugs must be available in Australia as the guide is an Australian
one. We don't have all the drugs available in Australia as is in America, we
are much stricter here than in America and won't allow many drugs that are
allowed in America, or at least until more testing is done to assure the
safety of the general public.


>
> I'm glad to know you wouldn't give Ritalin to your child. That's
> something that should only be done under a doctor's prescription.

Of course, and is something thats only available if prescribed by a doctor,
but of course you knew that didn't you. Actually if my doctor wanted to
prescribe Ritalin to my child, i definately would not allow it.


>
> And by the way--it's safe and works very well in many cases of ADHD,
> when administered under a doctor's prescription. Have a nice day.

Of course it's safe for some, but many others will find that the side
effects will show their ugly heads. I have found in some cases prescriptions
are not safe under doctors supervision, for example, my mother was
prescribed antibiotics and cortisone at the same time by the same doctor, a
real big no no and one that nearly killed her.
It may work in some cases of ADHD but not all as the info says. The info
also says that they don't know what the effects are if given to a child
under 6, so until they know 100% for sure that a child under 6 will be ok to
take it, then in my opinion it should be avoided until an assurance can be
made. Another major cause for concern is the addictiveness of the drug, A
drug that is as addictive as Ritalin must be supervised, especially in
children.


Thankyou, I always try to have a nice day, and you have one too :-)


Love and Light
Steven

Mark Probert

unread,
May 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/26/00
to
In article <8ggjan$7vc$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, Dr. S.

<drs...@juno.com> wrote:
>Whew! Thank you for the post. One may add (or is that "adhd,"
in child
>psych lingo) the possible side effect of Ritalin-induced
cancer, which
>has been so thoroughly demonstrated in mice that a couple of
years ago,
>the US government sponsored a mailing warning of this to over
100,000
>US pediatricians. No such mailing was made to patients'
families.
>
>"When I can't stops me fiddlin' I just takes me Ritalin; I'm
poppin'
>and sailin', man!" (Bart Simpson)

Now, that is just what I call one heck of an authoritative
source. Higher than John uses, way below that of someone who
professes to be a doctor.


>In article <8gd8ah$tkr$1...@newsg3.svr.pol.co.uk>,
> "John" <wh...@whaleto.freeserve.co.uk> wrote:
>> Ritalin Fraud http://www.ritalinfraud.com/

Breggin drivel, repeated by the King of Drivel, deleted....

* Sent from RemarQ http://www.remarq.com The Internet's Discussion Network *
The fastest and easiest way to search and participate in Usenet - Free!


Mark Probert

unread,
May 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/26/00
to
In article <q72ois8tg1k0q5bsi...@4ax.com>, Joe
Parsons <j...@cyber-mall.com> wrote:
>On Wed, 24 May 2000 12:52:46 GMT, Dr. S. <drs...@juno.com>

wrote:
>
>>Whew! Thank you for the post. One may add (or is that "adhd,"
in child
>>psych lingo) the possible side effect of Ritalin-induced
cancer, which
>>has been so thoroughly demonstrated in mice that a couple of
years ago,
>
>Oh, you mean the 1995 NIH study?
>
>It's at http://ntp-server.niehs.nih.gov/htdocs/LT-
studies/tr439.html.
>
>The FDA letter you refer to is at
>Http://www.fda.gov//bbs/topics/ANSWERS/ANS00705.html.
>
>>the US government sponsored a mailing warning of this to over
100,000
>>US pediatricians. No such mailing was made to patients'
families.
>
>Do you suppose the fact that the causative link is so tenuous
might have
>something to do with it? Or the fact that the rare, non-fatal
liver tumors have
>occurred *only* in lab rodents that develop tumors readily? Or
perhaps that
>there have been no cancers in humans related to the use of
methylphenidate?
>

I wonder if these are the same rodents that developed tumors
twenty years ago that saccharin cuased? You know, the tumors
that do not occur in humans?

BTW, the study also showed that certain types of tumors had a
lower incident in the MPH treated rodents.

>==========================================================
>Frequently Asked Questions for alt.support.attn-deficit
>and other resources for dealing with attention deficit
>disorder are at http://www.cyber-mall.com/asad/
>
>

Mark Probert

unread,
May 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/26/00
to
In article <8gjcbn$8vs$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, Dr. S.

<drs...@juno.com> wrote:
>I think the following statement by the FDA is sufficient to
warrant
>greatly increased caution with Ritalin: "FDA considers the
results of
>the studies a signal of a weak cancer-causing potential for
this drug."

However, the researchers who did the work, and studied the issue
said:

"Increased incidences of neoplasms (cancers) were not seen in
rats. However, there was a notable decrease in mammary gland
fibroadenomas in female rats and a marginal decrease in benign
pheochromocytomas in male rats.

Epidemiology studies of methylphenidate have found no evidence
of a carcinogenic effect in humans and like our findings in
rats, report a less than expected rate of cancers in patients
taking methylphenidate." (Toxicology 1995 Nov 30;103(2):77-84)

Thus, two types of tumors are significantly reduced (when
compared to the term 'weak signal') and, epidemiological studies
show that the weak signal produces nothing.

IOW, the evidence is clearly in favor of the conclusion that
there is no reason to believe that there is any hightened risk
for developing a tumor when taking MPH.

To say otherwise is to engage in pure scaremongering. Breggin
does it. I trust that is not your standard.

BTW, you really ought to update your web pages on the nutrition-
ADHD connection fantasy.

Mark Probert

unread,
May 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/26/00
to
In article <8gjd1c$9eb$1...@nnrp1.deja.com>, Dr. S.

<drs...@juno.com> wrote:
>There is an old *Shoe* cartoon where the overweight, cigar-
smoking
>Perfesser is sitting at a diner counter and is told to eat his
carrotts
>because it's been shown that they prevent cancer in rats. His
response
>is, "Why would I want to prevent cancer in rats?"

First Bart Simpson...now a Shoe cartoon...

Aside to John:

John, buddy, Dr. Saul's sources are more credible than yours.

Mark Probert

unread,
May 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/26/00
to
In article <vzdX4.62
$oD....@newsread1.prod.itd.earthlink.net>, "Medicine Tools"
<medt...@earthlink.net> wrote:
>SAFE?????????????

Safe and effective. No scientific study has said otherwise. Care
to find one that does?

Note, anecdotes, books, Breggin, CCHR, etc. do not constitute
scientific studies.

>Chris Leithiser <clei...@bc.cc.ca.us> wrote in message
>news:392D480E...@bc.cc.ca.us...
>> Steven Fochi wrote:
>> >

>> > Here's some info on Ritalin from the drug companies for
anyone who wants
>> > more info.
>> >
>> > It's not a nice one and one i wouldn't give to my child,
especially if
>the
>> > child is young as they don't know how it affects a young
child yet.
>>
>>

>> Very good. You can paste-and-copy out of the PDR. Can you
_read_ the
>> PDR as well?
>>

>> You might check out some of the known side-effects of, say,
aspirin. Or
>> Tylenol.
>>

>> I'm glad to know you wouldn't give Ritalin to your child.
That's
>> something that should only be done under a doctor's
prescription.
>>

>> And by the way--it's safe and works very well in many cases
of ADHD,
>> when administered under a doctor's prescription. Have a nice
day.
>>

* Sent from RemarQ http://www.remarq.com The Internet's Discussion Network *

Mark Probert

unread,
May 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/26/00
to
In article <JAdX4.74
>To bad some folks are so uninformed . Chris???

True. Studies show that if there were better information more
kids would receive adequate pharmacotherapy. However, the
proliferation of the lies and myths vis-a-vis MPH have prevented
this.

It is truly the most tragic aspect of ADHD that even today, MPH
and other meds are woefully underused.

>Chris Leithiser <clei...@bc.cc.ca.us> wrote in message

>news:392D4C7A...@bc.cc.ca.us...


>> "Dr. S." wrote:
>> >
>> > Thank you. Any bets on how many parents have seen, let
alone actually
>> > read, the full text of Ritalin's contraindications and side
effects?
>> >
>>

>> All have had the opportunity, since it's on the package
insert available
>> at any pharmacy.
>>
>> Actually read? Damned few, of course. Damned few read the
warning
>> labels on the cough syrup they give, too. Or the Advil and
Tylenol
>> bottles.
>>
>> Good thing Ritalin's such a benign substance, then.
>>
>
>
>
>

Mark Probert

unread,
May 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/26/00
to
In article <qd9risorgsg5a30qb...@4ax.com>, Joe
Parsons <j...@cyber-mall.com> wrote:
>On Thu, 25 May 2000 14:41:22 GMT, Dr. S. <drs...@juno.com>
wrote:
>

>>Thank you. Any bets on how many parents have seen, let alone
actually
>>read, the full text of Ritalin's contraindications and side
effects?
>
>Any bets on how many parents have read all the side effects and
>contraindications for the medications frequently prescribed for
other medical
>conditions?
>
>Any idea what the incidence of the less benign side effects
actually is?
>
>>My opinion on attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder is
posted at
>>http://doctoryourself.com/adhd.html and
>>http://doctoryourself.com/nerves.html
>
>You might want to update that a tad--much of the information
there is over 10
>years old and was debunked years ago. Growth suppression is
one of them, and
>the efficacy of the Feingold Diet.
>
>Joe Parsons

Feingold was debunked more than a decade ago. I doubt Dr. Saul
will change his stripes.

Chris Leithiser

unread,
May 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/26/00
to
Steven Fochi wrote:
>
>
> Of course it's safe for some, but many others will find that the side
> effects will show their ugly heads. I have found in some cases prescriptions
> are not safe under doctors supervision, for example, my mother was
> prescribed antibiotics and cortisone at the same time by the same doctor, a
> real big no no and one that nearly killed her.

As _you_ pointed out, the discussion was about Ritalin. Information
such as that in the PDR is specifically intended to help prevent
interactions such as the one you describe. Do you know that, when
coupled with certain antidepressants, pizza can be lethal?

> It may work in some cases of ADHD but not all as the info says. The info
> also says that they don't know what the effects are if given to a child
> under 6, so until they know 100% for sure that a child under 6 will be ok to
> take it, then in my opinion it should be avoided until an assurance can be
> made.

Perhaps they can add your opinion to the PDR. :) Actually, that
statement says that the effects on the under-6 crowd have not been
studied--for good reason, in my opinion. It does not say it isn't
_safe_ to give to kids under 6, though.

>Another major cause for concern is the addictiveness of the drug, A
> drug that is as addictive as Ritalin must be supervised, especially in
> children.

Ritalin is not, repeat _not_, addictive when given as prescribed. You
have to work _hard_ to get addicted to Ritalin, and once you do, you've
got worse problems than addiction--emphysema, for example, or possibly
hepatitis from dirty needles.

I would supervise children in taking any drug--it's easier to overdose
fatally on aspirin or Tylenol than Ritalin, for example.

But the fact that parents should supervise their childrens' medication
intake is no more a reason to restrict Ritalin use than it is to
restrict any _other_ medication.

Steve Dyer

unread,
May 26, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/26/00
to
In article <392EA155...@bc.cc.ca.us>,
Chris Leithiser <clei...@bc.cc.ca.us> quoted someone else:

>> I have found in some cases prescriptions
>> are not safe under doctors supervision, for example, my mother was
>> prescribed antibiotics and cortisone at the same time by the same doctor,
>> a real big no no and one that nearly killed her.

This so-called contraindication between "antibiotics and cortisone" (huh?)
doesn't make any sense. Sounds like 3rd hand information garbled and
repeated by a medically naive mother to an equally medically naive son
or daughter.

Chris Leithiser <clei...@bc.cc.ca.us> wrote:
>> a drug that is as addictive as Ritalin must be supervised, especially in


>> children.
>
>Ritalin is not, repeat _not_, addictive when given as prescribed.

The term "addictive" is practically useless in this context, since
it has about a dozen informal meanings, and isn't used in the scientific
literature when authors are trying to be rigorous. Sympathomimetic CNS
stimulants like Ritalin and even d-amphetamine/d-methamphetamine
aren't "addictive" when taken orally at recommended doses. People can stop
taking these drugs at any time without any physical withdrawal syndrome.
Retrospective studies of their chronic use in children with ADD haven't
revealed any propensity for them to be misused in that population.

>You have to work _hard_ to get addicted to Ritalin, and once you do, you've
>got worse problems than addiction--emphysema, for example, or possibly
>hepatitis from dirty needles.

Just to be clear, this is referring to dissolving and injecting the oral
tablets (that contain excipients such as talc that are dangerous when
injected.) The effects of a drug like Ritalin when administered IV
is much stronger than when taken orally.

However, even oral preparations can be abused by people who:
want to get high, and to do that, they:

take larger than recommended doses
steadily increase the dose when they experience
tolerance (i.e., when a dose that previously
got them high no longer does.)
(and this assumes these people have more-or-less
free access to the drug to be able to
take large doses chronically and regularly
increase these doses)

This is an entirely different population using much higher doses of
the drug for a very different purpose. Even a relatively mild
CNS stimulant like Ritalin can cause some of the more extreme
symptoms of amphetamine abuse if the subject has unlimited access
to the drug in an unsupervised setting and is intent on using it
as I describe above. Ritalin was popular in the 1960's for the
treatment of "mild depression" (a poorly-defined term that
isn't used much anymore). I don't know the details of how it
was sold in Sweden back them (perhaps w/o a Rx), but because it
was so freely available, there was a real social epidemic of
misuse, and that led to its being removed from the market in
that country by 1968 or 1969. (I don't know whether it's once
again sold in Sweden under more stringent WHO-inspired drug laws,
now that it's been somewhat rehabilitated.)

>But the fact that parents should supervise their childrens' medication
>intake is no more a reason to restrict Ritalin use than it is to
>restrict any _other_ medication.

Indeed.

--
Steve Dyer
dy...@ursa-major.spdcc.com

Xtina

unread,
May 27, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/27/00
to

Medicine Tools wrote:
>
> SAFE?????????????


> Chris Leithiser <clei...@bc.cc.ca.us> wrote in message

> news:392D480E...@bc.cc.ca.us...
> > Steven Fochi wrote:
> > >
> > > Here's some info on Ritalin from the drug companies for anyone who wants
> > > more info.
> > >
> > > It's not a nice one and one i wouldn't give to my child, especially if
> the
> > > child is young as they don't know how it affects a young child yet.
> >
> >
> > Very good. You can paste-and-copy out of the PDR. Can you _read_ the
> > PDR as well?
> >
> > You might check out some of the known side-effects of, say, aspirin. Or
> > Tylenol.

Why?

Jeffrey Peter, M.D.

unread,
May 27, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/27/00
to
The filing of a lawsuit does not mean that the defendants have done anything
wrong. Only that a lawsuit has been filed. That is all.

Jeff

CBI

unread,
May 27, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/27/00
to
I wasn't going to go there but you are right. There is no contraindication
between antibiotics and steroids. In fact the two are quite commonly used
together, especially in asthmatics and people who have autoimmune diseases.

--
CBI, M.D.

Please note: It is impossible to accurately diagnose medical problems
without seeing the patient and reviewing the entire history. These posts are
intended to be helpful and informative. Always check with your doctor before
following any advice given.


"Steve Dyer" <dy...@spdcc.com> wrote in message
news:siAX4.29282$Ft1.1...@typhoon.ne.mediaone.net...

D. C. & M. V. Sessions

unread,
May 27, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/27/00
to
"Dr. S." wrote:
>
> I doubt if two wrongs will ever make a right. To even casually compare
> the dangers of second-hand smoke with those of first-hand Ritalin
> consumption by 2 million children a day confirms, to me, that the
> safety issue is a real one. The government of the people, for the
> people should be woken up by the people.

So if I casually compare drinking water with cigarette smoking,
you'll immediately give up drinking?

--
| Bogus as it might seem, people, this really is a deliverable |
| e-mail address. Of course, there isn't REALLY a lumber cartel. |
| There isn't really a tooth fairy, but whois toothfairy.com works. |
+----------- D. C. & M. V. Sessions <d...@lumbercartel.com> ----------+

dcs.vcf

AndyS

unread,
May 29, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/29/00
to
Chris Leithiser wrote:

> Steven Fochi wrote:
> >
> >
> > Of course it's safe for some, but many others will find that the side

> > effects will show their ugly heads. I have found in some cases prescriptions


> > are not safe under doctors supervision, for example, my mother was
> > prescribed antibiotics and cortisone at the same time by the same doctor, a
> > real big no no and one that nearly killed her.
>

> As _you_ pointed out, the discussion was about Ritalin. Information
> such as that in the PDR is specifically intended to help prevent
> interactions such as the one you describe. Do you know that, when
> coupled with certain antidepressants, pizza can be lethal?

Hi! I am a bit new to all this Ritalin. I just like to know, why pizza can be
lethal if eaten with Ritalin??? My daughter loves pizza and my ex put her on
Ritalin, so I am a bit waried now.

Andy


D. C. & M. V. Sessions

unread,
May 29, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/29/00
to

Not Ritalin, "certain antidepressants." IIRC some antidepressants (including
St. John's Wort) are monoamine oxidase inhibitors. These have nasty
interactions with chemicals found in some meds and even some foods.

Ritalin (methylphenidate) is one of the safest drugs around. Extremely
wide therapeutic range, short serum half-life, relatively few and mild
side-effects (and those pretty rare.) The risks for acetaminophen (Tylenol)
are orders of magnitude worse.

dcs.vcf

Joe Parsons

unread,
May 29, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/29/00
to
On Mon, 29 May 2000 16:26:47 +1000, AndyS <an...@accsoft.com.au> wrote:

>Chris Leithiser wrote:
>
>> Steven Fochi wrote:
>> >
>> >
>> > Of course it's safe for some, but many others will find that the side
>> > effects will show their ugly heads. I have found in some cases prescriptions
>> > are not safe under doctors supervision, for example, my mother was
>> > prescribed antibiotics and cortisone at the same time by the same doctor, a
>> > real big no no and one that nearly killed her.
>>
>> As _you_ pointed out, the discussion was about Ritalin. Information
>> such as that in the PDR is specifically intended to help prevent
>> interactions such as the one you describe. Do you know that, when
>> coupled with certain antidepressants, pizza can be lethal?
>
>Hi! I am a bit new to all this Ritalin. I just like to know, why pizza can be
>lethal if eaten with Ritalin??? My daughter loves pizza and my ex put her on
>Ritalin, so I am a bit waried now.

Ritalin isn't an antidepressant--it's a stimulant.

And no worries about eating pizza with it! The track record of safety for
Ritalin over 50 years is excellent.

Joe Parsons

>
>Andy

Connie

unread,
May 30, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/30/00
to
Button pushed. Rant warning.......

The acceptance of Ritalin as suitable for masses of children is horrific.
Disclaimer: Of course there may be a TINY percentage of people helped to focus, or
cope, with psychotropic drugs, and for whom this choice makes their lives bearable.
Some of these people also use Cocaine as their drug of choice. Legality in
dispensation is the only difference.

Our US educational system bores bright children beyond their endurance, requires
their sitting interminably, which is against the nature of children, and then we drug
them into stupors because they are "unruly?" #&^&*%. Unruly? Because they can't
sit quietly for hours and have their minds numbed w/ stupidity???? Children should
run, romp, explore, experiment hands on. Take the kids for a run - don't drug them
into catatonia.

Talk w/ representatives of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department, or the U.S.
Army about their active dislike of Ritalin.

There are scads of highly effective alternative approaches to ADHD - diet,
supplements, biofeedback, etc. One might try these sites as starting places for
information about alternatives to drugs:

http://www.Feingold.org
http://www.alternate-health.com
http://www.HolisticMed.com/add/
http://www.hyperactivekids.com
Professional Resources for health issues.
Free advice on learning, behavior, emotions, nutrition and health.

Connie

Connie

unread,
May 30, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/30/00
to
Debunked? by whom? A "scientific study?" How quaint. Perhaps you should
canvass the thousands of parents whose children have benefitted from removing
various foods from their children's diets, a la Feingold? Too cumbersome? Of
course. One must pack everyone into that little science box for any suitable or
acceptable "truth" - most inconvenient for studiites.

It is also most fortunate for many children that many parents pursue
alternatives and ignore/reject all the little boxes the studiites wish to stuff
them into.

Have a nice day.

Connie

Mark Probert

unread,
May 30, 2000, 3:00:00 AM5/30/00
to
In article <39335E31...@bellsouth.net>, Connie
<cgr...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
>Button pushed. Rant warning.......

Ditto.......................

>The acceptance of Ritalin as suitable for masses of children is
horrific.

Nah. It isn't. It is a fantastic thing that so many kids whose
lives would be spent uselessly have a means to lead productive
lives.

>Disclaimer: Of course there may be a TINY percentage of people
helped to focus, or
>cope, with psychotropic drugs, and for whom this choice makes
their lives bearable.

MPH is not a psychotropic drug. You my want to call it that,
but, it is not. It is a mild CNS stimulant.

>Some of these people also use Cocaine as their drug of choice.
Legality in
>dispensation is the only difference.

Oh, no. You mean that people have been lying to use? MPH, when
used as prescribed, demonstrably has a physiciological reaction
different than that of cocaine. You mean that you did not know
that? Terrible.

>Our US educational system bores bright children beyond their
endurance, requires
>their sitting interminably, which is against the nature of
children, and then we drug
>them into stupors because they are "unruly?"

If a kid is merely unruly in school, then a diagnosis of ADHD is
not appropriate. Apparently, you are woefully unfamiliar with
the DSM and AAP guildelines on diagnostic methodology. Why not
get yourself some real knowledge?

#&^&*%. Unruly? Because they can't
>sit quietly for hours and have their minds numbed w/
stupidity???? Children should
>run, romp, explore, experiment hands on. Take the kids for a
run - don't drug them
>into catatonia.

Thank G-d that MPH does not do that.

>Talk w/ representatives of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's
Department, or the U.S.
>Army about their active dislike of Ritalin.

Sure. Why not post verifiable information to support that?

>There are scads of highly effective alternative approaches to
ADHD - diet,

ADHD is not caused by diet.

>supplements,

One of the supplement manufacturers just had to eat some all
natural crow and withdraw their specious claims that their
supplement did anything for ADHD.

>biofeedback,

Long term viability has not been demonstrated. I know, because I
asked the leading researcher/salesman if it had.

etc. One might try these sites as starting places for
>information about alternatives to drugs:
>
>http://www.Feingold.org

The Fool$gold organization/diet had been debunked by every
scientific study that has examined it.

>