Getting back into shape - Question

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ri...@austinconsumerwatch.org

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May 18, 2003, 5:01:15 PM5/18/03
to
Hello,

After a 4 and a half year hiatus I have finally decided to get
back into shape for both health reasons and to shed the 60 lbs I have put on
since I got out of the Army.

I am trying to keep it as basic as possible- doing at least 30 minutes of
moderate to strenuous cardiovascular activity 6 days a week. My activities
vary from using the elliptical trainer to cycling, walking and hiking. I am
using a
heart rate monitor to stay within my "fat burning" range of 115 to 165 beats
per minute.

As for food, I am just eating sensibly. No counting calories, however trying
to keep my calories from fat down below 30%.

Vitals:

Height: 5 feet 9 inches
Weight: 245 lbs
Age: 28

Target HR: 121 - 163
Max HR: 192

During my hike today, I noticed that my heartrate was peaking at around 170
when going up the trail- I of course was huffing and puffing once I got
above 155, requiring three two minute breaks on my way up the 2 mile trail
(not bad compared
to my first time up this particular trail). After getting to the top and
taking a 7 minute breather, I began heading down the trail. I maneuvered
down the trail with ease- truly aerobic breathing, no gasping for air etc. I
noticed, however that my heart was a constant 160 +/- all the way down.

So, my question is, how is it that going up the hill I start huffing and
puffing once I get above 155 but going down, I maintain 160 and am breathing
perfectly?

I know it has something to do with getting blood/oxygen to muscles that are
working much harder going up, but am I then getting a better workout (from a
fat burning standpoint) going down since my constant heartrate is higher?

Thanks for any assistance!

Rick

--
Rick G. Garibay
ri...@austinconsumerwatch.org
www.austinconsumerwatch.org


Steve Freides

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May 18, 2003, 5:58:12 PM5/18/03
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The concept of a "fat burning zone" should be taken with a grain of
salt. Unless you're doing a *lot* of endurance work, a calorie burned
is a calorie burned, period. There is value in staying in this zone for
a few hours at a time if you're training for a marathon or similar but,
for most folks, doing high-intensity interval training will do more for
increased metabolism and fat loss than steady-state but relatively easy
aerobics will - and you'll get stronger, too.

Pavel Tsatsouline, a former Speznatz instructor, has been doing a lot of
work with military and law enforcement in this country since coming over
from the Dark Side. In the US military we test with pushups, etc., but
in the Soviet military, the test was always kettlebell snatches. Read
more about kettlebells on my web site, http:///www.kbnj.com, and follow
the links to the publisher's site as well. Kettlebell training can be
simple but it's not for the faint of heart. However, if you're willing
to work hard at it, it will yield phenomenal results for you - no
kidding.

-S-

B a r r y B u r k e J r .

unread,
May 18, 2003, 7:01:02 PM5/18/03
to
Steve Freides wrote:
>
> Read
> more about kettlebells on my web site, http:///www.kbnj.com, and follow
> the links to the publisher's site as well.


You forgot to mention that your link to the publisher's site sends the
user over as "your" referral (affiliate #1022). I'm not saying these
things aren't useful, but what do you get out of the referral?

Barry

B a r r y B u r k e J r .

unread,
May 18, 2003, 7:05:07 PM5/18/03
to
Steve Freides wrote:
>
> Read
> more about kettlebells on my web site, http:///www.kbnj.com, and follow
> the links to the publisher's site as well.

You forgot to mention that your link to the publisher's site sends the
user over as "your" referral (affiliate #1022). I'm not saying these
things aren't useful, but what do you get out of the referral?

Oh, that's right, from:
<http://www.dragondoor.com/finalaffiliates.html>

Here are our products and the commissions you can start earning right
away:
Product:
Books and Videos
30%
Commission
Example
One sale of Pavel's Power to the
People book, you get $10.48!
Imagine if you sell 1,000 copies!
Product:
Equipment and Clothing
15%
Commission
Example
One sale of the Ab Pavelizer
Classic, you get $25.50!
Imagine if you sell 1,000!
Product:
Supplements
20%
Commission
Example
One sale of Feeling Fit Blueberry
Whey Protein Powder, you get $7.19!
Imagine if you sell 1,000 units!

Barry

Steve Freides

unread,
May 20, 2003, 6:53:51 AM5/20/03
to
Barry, I mention my affiliate ID and that I make a commission on these
things very often - I don't bother to put it in every message. For your
benefit, here's the text of a message from alt.sport.weightlifting where
I explain my motives in great detail. I snipped out much of the
original content but left in a little as well as my entire explanation.

If you've got any questions or still feel I'm not being forthcoming,
speak up again. I will also add that I've posted things similar to this
in misc.fitness.aerobics and misc.fitness.misc (and other groups I
frequent) before. I see several of the groups on this thread aren't my
usual haunts so perhaps that's where you're from in this context.

**** Begin copied message ****

Subject: Re: Help with getting back on track
Date: Tue, 13 May 2003 17:16:36 -0400
From: Steve Freides <st...@fridayscomputer.com>
Newsgroups: alt.sport.weightlifting
References: 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5

Bob Garrison wrote:

-earlier content snipped-

> > > > If you'd like to try something different - that's got a reputation for
> > > > hacking the fat right off you - consider kettlelbells. See my little
> > > > web site for more info:
> > > >
> > > > http://www.kbnj.com
> > >
> > > Oh c'mon Steve, you're starting to sound like a spammer.
> >
> > When someone is in relatively good shape already and wants to hack off
> > those last few pounds of fat, and isn't worrying about their competition
> > totals at their next meet, high volume kettlebell ballistics are just
> > what the doctor ordered. They'll put a little meat on your bones if
> > you're skinny but not much. For those not in good shape now, it just
> > takes a little more time. And there are lots of folks now using
> > kettlebells for active recovery as part of a powerlifting program, too.
> >
> > I mention all this because I believe it's also helpful advice; at worst,
> > it's a little knowledge for anyone who's not familiar with kettlebell
> > training. The old-timers used to lift barbells, dumbbells, and
> > kettlebells. Everyone ought to be familiar with all three and know what
> > the benefits of training with them all can be. Since most folks,
> > especially those who aren't regulars here, aren't familiar with
> > kettlebells, I'm the evangelist -it's a tough job but somebody's got to
> > do it. <grin> I've created my web site specifically for kettlebell
> > newbies because I think there's a need among both the general public and
> > those who already lift iron.
> >
> > So _there_!!!
>
> Are you saying your motives are purely altruistic?

No, but they are largely altruistic. My web site, which I've gone to
the trouble to put together and continue to work on, brings me about
$100/month in commissions from the sale of kettlebells and related
materials. It costs us around $25/month to have it hosted so we do
generate some income for our labor but, as you will see if you visit the
DragonDoor discussion forum, I'm an active participant there as well and
it makes me not a nickel. I look at the web site and the income it
generates as a way for me to feel a little less guilty about the time I
spend on the newsgroups answering (and asking as well, of course)
questions. I do not feel any conflict of interest - I spent just as
much time talking about kettlebells here and on mfw before the web site
as I do now. If someone thinks my motives are purely financial, they
are, in my opinion, mistaken, but everyone is entitled to their own
opinion so all I can do is tell you the bottom line here and let you
decide for yourself. And, to be even more honest, putting together the
web site is also beneficial to me because I work in computers but don't
know much about the design of web sites, so I've benefitted from the
whole process in that manner as well, and learning about web development
was a significant part of why I bothered to do all this in the first
place.

And, to complicate the issue of my motives further, I may soon start
offering my services as a kettlebell instructor and personal trainer on
a professional basis. I expect that I will charge only for my in-person
teaching/training and not for anything long-distance/email, but I don't
rule out that as a possibility. As it is now, I'd say I get about one
email per week asking me for specific training advice which I answer to
the best of my ability - this is email, not newsgroup messages - and
usually results in several back and forths before the person feels
content to continue to work on their own. I'm happy to be able to do
this sort of thing and will probably always do it for free but, as they
say, you never know.

> To quote the bard - ''Methinks thou protest too much"
>
> So _there_!!!

Back atcha.


**** End copied message ****


"B a r r y B u r k e J r ." wrote:
>
> Steve Freides wrote:
> >
> > Read
> > more about kettlebells on my web site, http:///www.kbnj.com, and follow
> > the links to the publisher's site as well.
>
> You forgot to mention that your link to the publisher's site sends the
> user over as "your" referral (affiliate #1022). I'm not saying these
> things aren't useful, but what do you get out of the referral?
>
> Oh, that's right, from:
> <http://www.dragondoor.com/finalaffiliates.html>
>
> Here are our products and the commissions you can start earning right
> away:

Edited for brevity only: items sold and commissions

> Books and Videos - 30%

> Equipment and Clothing - 15%

> Supplements - 20%

> Barry

The typical kettlebell starter purchase by someone makes me a commission
of between $10 and $25 and we get about one or two per week of those.

-S-

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