Flatter Abs?

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Dale Elson

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May 1, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/1/96
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--------

Greetings :-)

I just read an article by Jim Eddy in the current edition of the
National Bodybuilding and Fitness Magazine
[http://pages.prodigy.com/N/B/F/nbaf/home.html#edit]
that was very interesting, and I thought that we might benefit from
a discussion of it. In his article, Jim presents a method of
"flattening" the stomache by reducing the average length of the
muscle fibers in the abs. This seems likely to work (if it doesn't
affect the posture), since if the person with shortened abs stands
as erect as he did before the abs were shortened, then the abs will
be stretched to a smaller cross-section. This should produce less
thickness in the ab muscles, which would make for "flatter" abs.

There are two pretty standard components to the method - frequent
training & using a large number of reps - that seem fairly standard.
The really interesting part of the method relies on the body's
ability to adapt to specific training, and calls for the abs to be
worked over a reduced range of motion, from fully contracted to
about 30ish degrees from horizontal (warning, warning, danger Will
Robinson! - bad ASCII art alert):
o o
/\\ to /\/ but with much flatter / & \

This reduced ROM is designed to shorten the muscle fibers in some
not_well_understood fashion.

So? (so go read the article, please, before replying).

So, does this method sound like it might shorten the muscle fibers?
Would such a shortening of the ab fibers yield a "flatter" stomache?
Might the posture be unprofitably affected?
Might there be functional reasons not to shorten these muscles?
Like maybe an increased chance of pulling a muscle during aerobics
or etc. (Anyone ever hear of a pulled tummy muscle?

Lastly, anyone have any good stories or other anecdotal evidence
related to this idea?

Thanks................Dale

hoc...@imap2.asu.edu

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May 2, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/2/96
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On 1 May 1996, Dale Elson wrote:

> So? (so go read the article, please, before replying).
>
> So, does this method sound like it might shorten the muscle fibers?
> Would such a shortening of the ab fibers yield a "flatter" stomache?
> Might the posture be unprofitably affected?
> Might there be functional reasons not to shorten these muscles?
> Like maybe an increased chance of pulling a muscle during aerobics
> or etc. (Anyone ever hear of a pulled tummy muscle?

A pulled "tunny muscle" kills. I had to stay two extra weeks in Basic
Training because I couldn't do situps due to a pulled stomach muscle. I
can't see pulling one during aerobics, though...

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Jim & Walt

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May 3, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/3/96
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On May 01, 1996 17:50:57 in article <Flatter Abs?>, 'el...@austin.ibm.com

(Dale Elson)' wrote:


>I just read an article by Jim Eddy in the current edition of the
>National Bodybuilding and Fitness Magazine
>[http://pages.prodigy.com/N/B/F/nbaf/home.html#edit]
>that was very interesting, and I thought that we might benefit from
>a discussion of it. In his article, Jim presents a method of
>"flattening" the stomache by reducing the average length of the
>muscle fibers in the abs. This seems likely to work (if it doesn't

Hi,

Thanks for the mention! I think anyone who tries this will find in a very
short time (within two or three weeks) that it is - very effective in
waistline reduction. It is important to note that this has nothing to do
with weight loss, or fat reduction (which are also effective). Many friends
have had excellent results with this - and I have helped many bodybuilders
correct the 'bloated' waist look.
(PS - nothing needed, ie: equip, sup)
The info is free - Thanks!

Jim Eddy, editor, nbaf...@usa.pipeline.com
National Bodybuilding & Fitness Magazine
Free site! Non - commercial!

(temp) http://www.netmart.com/nbaf/home.html
(this is a temp address, we will have a new domain 'nbaf'
set up in a few days - this is the best connection)

(mirrior) http://pages.prodigy.com/nbaf/home.html


Jim & Walt

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May 3, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/3/96
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On May 02, 1996 08:12:56 in article <Re: Flatter Abs?>,

'hoc...@imap2.asu.edu' wrote:
>A pulled "tunny muscle" kills. I had to stay two extra weeks in Basic
>Training because I couldn't do situps due to a pulled stomach muscle. I
>can't see pulling one during aerobics, though...

RE: There are no 'dangers' in the training described in the article, quite
the opposite - it is about as 'safe' as any type of training could be -
much less risk of injury than the way many people train abs, (not that
there is much danger in ab training), which is part of the subject of the
article.

Jim Eddy, editor, nbaf...@usa.pipeline.com
National Bodybuilding & Fitness Magazine
Free site! Non - commercial!

(temp) http://www.netmart.com/nbaf/home.html

(mirrior) http://pages.prodigy.com/nbaf/home.html


Larry DeLuca

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May 6, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/6/96
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[No dangers to ab training in the NBAF article? How does it work?]

The exercise described actually involves primarily hip flexor work (since
the hip joint is the only joint where significant movement occurs).
The abdominals are acting primarily as stabilizers, contracting
isometrically.

While this does relate to their function, it is not clear that this
exercise offers superior training advantages over merely remembering
to hold one's abdominals in. No doubt the fact that the exerciser
has probably replaced their regular abdominal training with this
exercise has also reduced the amount of work the abs perform in a
typical session, and thus the principle of reversibility comes into
play and the muscle reduces its size somewhat on its own.

As for risks to the average person, it's important to understand
where the hip flexors attach to. They have their origin in the low
back, and insert into the femur. This means that in the position
described (legs out with feet held under an immovable object, body 2/3
of the way to the floor, shoulders stopping about a foot from the floor)
that a tremendous amount of pull is generated on the lumbar vertebrae
due to the weight of the upper body and its position relative to
gravity. While some individuals can maintain this position and can
successfully stabilize the torso using the abdominal and erector spinae
muscles, the exercise in question provides a high degree of risk to
the average participant.

larry...

--
--------"It's my personal opinion that people need to be more clear about what
is fact and what is in fact their personal opinion." -- me

Larry DeLuca

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May 6, 1996, 3:00:00 AM5/6/96
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[Abdominal exercises and safety..I forgot to mention...]

It might make more sense to simply reduce the amount of training
provided to the rectus abdominis, and to stretch the muscle (which
can help improve flexibility and counteract the "muscle-bound"
posture described).

To stretch the abdominals, lie face down and come up onto your elbows,
keeping your head neutral. Relax and hold the position, and gently
lower back to the ground.

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