Google Groups no longer supports new Usenet posts or subscriptions. Historical content remains viewable.
Dismiss

my first trip to Costco . . .

11 views
Skip to first unread message

Tock

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 10:29:46 AM2/11/05
to
I still don't like the idea of having to pay $45 for the privilege of
shopping in somebody's store, but a friend suggested that would be a good
place to go for stuff like paper towels and TP & other cleaning stuff.
Well, I went yesterday, and it was like Christmas . . .
Besides stuff like TP (I got the giant rolls) and other stuff, they had the
perfect table for the breakroom ($99), and they've got giant $$$ saving
packages of solid white canned tuna (the good stuff) and the almonds I've
been buying from Kroger in the little 3 oz bags for $1.39, I can now get 3
lb bags for $10 (better than half price). Got a bunch of latex gloves
(gotta have 'em for shaving customers) 300 for $10, while Home Depot charges
$6 for 100. Pretty cool.

Only thing is . . . they don't take any credit cards other than American
Express, which they didn't tell me until after the lady at the cash register
had rung everything up. But a trip to the ATM machine fixed that . . .

Pretty cool . . . I'm not gonna get an AE card -- I can adjust to paying
with cash, but I still don't like the idea of paying to shop in someone's
store . . .

--Tock


Message has been deleted

Tock

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 10:44:27 AM2/11/05
to

"diddy" <di...@nospam.diddy.net> wrote
> No way, no how. Do you have an Aldi's close around?
> I'm NOT going to buy any store memberships. EVER


Never heard of Aldi.
What's that?
-Tock

Serendipity

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 10:59:16 AM2/11/05
to
Tock wrote:

Hey Tock :) We have a membership at Sam's. One of our kids have a
membership at Costco's. So we kind of share. BTW, the way these
warehouse stores keep costs down is not only their design but because
the general public cannot shop there and they are geared to a certain
clientele.

Sam's: Anyway, with Sam's sometimes there are special hours set aside
just for certain members so we get to shop without the crowds. We also
get discounts. This in itself basically pays for our membership and the
rest of the savings is gravy. Check to see if Costco's does the same.
I'm sure they do. Take a business card with you so they have it on
record. When we first signed up at Sam's we had to be a member of a
credit union or a business owner. It does save a lot of money if you
shop it properly, know your prices, and especially if you are a small
business owner. As far as credit cards, I don't even know how Sam's
handles this issue. We pay by cash or cheque; no hassles for using a
cheque either! They have a cash machine so we can always get cash from
our account. We prefer shopping with cash only anyway. Sam's is now in
Canada but we prefer a US Sam's as it is closer. In general, clean
supplies are really cheap as are some food items. We saved a lot at
Christmas which more than paid for our membership.

Costco's: We've only been to a Canadian Costco's so it might differ
from what you have. It really is very similar to Sam's. I don't know
about the credit card issue here but the one we go to has a cash
machine. They have similar items.

Message has been deleted

Wooly

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 11:07:58 AM2/11/05
to
What I wouldn't give for $1.89/gal milk. I'm paying anywhere from
$3.59-4.29 per gallon. We go through 6-8 gallons weekly...

On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 09:54:45 -0600, diddy <di...@nospam.diddy.net>
spewed forth :
>Milk is still expensive at $1.89 a gallon, but since Walmart has milk at
>$3 something, it's still a bargain.
>>

Chloe

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 11:13:56 AM2/11/05
to
"Wooly" <nob...@nun.ya> wrote in message
news:9ulp01h3k9ppvd0l7...@4ax.com...

In my recent interstate move, I learned that state law has a lot to do with
regulating milk prices.


Dennis

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 11:50:19 AM2/11/05
to
On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 15:29:46 GMT, "Tock" <to...@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

>I still don't like the idea of having to pay $45 for the privilege of
>shopping in somebody's store, but a friend suggested that would be a good
>place to go for stuff like paper towels and TP & other cleaning stuff.
>Well, I went yesterday, and it was like Christmas . . .

<snippage>


>Only thing is . . . they don't take any credit cards other than American
>Express, which they didn't tell me until after the lady at the cash register
>had rung everything up. But a trip to the ATM machine fixed that . . .
>
>Pretty cool . . . I'm not gonna get an AE card -- I can adjust to paying
>with cash, but I still don't like the idea of paying to shop in someone's
>store . . .

Welcome to the cult. BTW, they also take checks and ATM/debit cards
right at the register (at least they do at the stores I use).

Dennis (evil)
--
The honest man is the one who realizes that he cannot
consume more, in his lifetime, than he produces.

Dennis

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 11:56:29 AM2/11/05
to
On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 16:07:58 GMT, Wooly <nob...@nun.ya> wrote:

>What I wouldn't give for $1.89/gal milk. I'm paying anywhere from
>$3.59-4.29 per gallon. We go through 6-8 gallons weekly...

Oddly enough, the little quicky-mart/gas station down the road from us
has milk cheaper than the supermarkets ($2.75/gal vs. $3.25-4.00/gal).
Might be worth a look in your area.

Dennis (evil)
--
"What government gives, it must first take away."
- John S. Caldwell

Serendipity

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 11:00:49 AM2/11/05
to
diddy wrote:


> No way, no how. Do you have an Aldi's close around?
> I'm NOT going to buy any store memberships. EVER

Your loss ;)

Steve

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 12:38:30 PM2/11/05
to
Serendipity <goa...@spammers.com> wrote:
>Hey Tock :) We have a membership at Sam's. One of our kids have a
>membership at Costco's. So we kind of share. BTW, the way these
>warehouse stores keep costs down is not only their design but because
>the general public cannot shop there and they are geared to a certain
>clientele.

I read somewhere that the design stuff is a myth - the industrial look
actually costs more than most retail stores. It's done that way
because it makes customers feel like they're getting a good deal due
to cost-cutting. You may be getting a good deal, but design is not
the reason.

>Sam's: Anyway, with Sam's sometimes there are special hours set aside
>just for certain members so we get to shop without the crowds.

I much prefer Sam's because they're so unpopular locally. Everyone
apparently goes to Costco, so the Sam's store is relatively empty most
of the time. It's easy to pop in for a couple of quick items,
something I'd never try at Costco.

>It does save a lot of money if you
>shop it properly, know your prices, and especially if you are a small
>business owner.

True. The other thing a lot of folks don't realize is that they carry
lots of stuff you just won't find anywhere else, at least not locally.
Gourmet foods, etc. Sam's has a terrific huge chocolate bundt cake
that costs a mere 5 bucks. I always take it for potlucks - the trick
is to take it outta the plastic container and put it on a paper plate
so everyone thinks you made it from scratch. People are always
begging me for the recipe. I tell them it's a secret.

>As far as credit cards, I don't even know how Sam's
>handles this issue.

Sam's takes only Discover or its own card (your membership card can
double as a credit card). They used to take Mastercard, pretty
annoying that they stopped.


Mieko

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 1:25:05 PM2/11/05
to
In article <8eop01hf32c5ddaku...@4ax.com>, Dennis <dg...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 15:29:46 GMT, "Tock" <to...@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
>
>>I still don't like the idea of having to pay $45 for the privilege of
>>shopping in somebody's store, but a friend suggested that would be a good
>>place to go for stuff like paper towels and TP & other cleaning stuff.
>>Well, I went yesterday, and it was like Christmas . . .

Well I pay $100 for the executive membership and the amex card, but I get cash
back twice a year - once for the amex on everything I buy (over $250 this
year) and one for the executive membership on everything I buy at Costco
(don't remember how much this one was, but I'm pretty sure it was more than
$100.)

The executive memebership can even get you cheaper rates on things like credit
card processing if you're gonna need it.


Rod Speed

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 1:50:22 PM2/11/05
to

Steve <r...@qhd.inv> wrote in message
news:6qqp01lqita2u3add...@4ax.com...
> Serendipity <goa...@spammers.com> wrote

>> Hey Tock :) We have a membership at Sam's. One of our
>> kids have a membership at Costco's. So we kind of share.
>> BTW, the way these warehouse stores keep costs down is
>> not only their design but because the general public cannot
>> shop there and they are geared to a certain clientele.

> I read somewhere that the design stuff is a myth - the
> industrial look actually costs more than most retail stores.

Bet that was just the spew of some mindless journalist.

Cant see how the industrial look that involves a bare concrete
floor, all the goods on pallets where the customers get the
goods off the pallets, with the building in a low rent area,
with the operation having a restricted range of products
can be more expensive than most full supermarkets.

> It's done that way because it makes customers feel like
> they're getting a good deal due to cost-cutting. You may
> be getting a good deal, but design is not the reason.

Bet its one of the reasons.


SoCalMike

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 1:56:53 PM2/11/05
to
Steve wrote:
> Serendipity <goa...@spammers.com> wrote:
>
>>Hey Tock :) We have a membership at Sam's. One of our kids have a
>>membership at Costco's. So we kind of share. BTW, the way these
>>warehouse stores keep costs down is not only their design but because
>>the general public cannot shop there and they are geared to a certain
>>clientele.
>
>
> I read somewhere that the design stuff is a myth - the industrial look
> actually costs more than most retail stores. It's done that way
> because it makes customers feel like they're getting a good deal due
> to cost-cutting. You may be getting a good deal, but design is not
> the reason.

it is, partially. a bare concrete floor is cheaper than the same floor
covered with tile. pallet racks are cheaper and more durable than store
shelving. its easier/cheaper to do layout changes in a warehouse than to
remodel a store.

and the main reason- its easier to drop a pallet and plug it into a hole
than to pay a stocker to break the pallet down, open all the boxes, and
stock it on a shelf.


>
>
>>Sam's: Anyway, with Sam's sometimes there are special hours set aside
>>just for certain members so we get to shop without the crowds.
>
>
> I much prefer Sam's because they're so unpopular locally. Everyone
> apparently goes to Costco, so the Sam's store is relatively empty most
> of the time. It's easy to pop in for a couple of quick items,
> something I'd never try at Costco.

depends. sams does seem to cater more to the business crowd, while
costco has gone more upscale. why? sams has the pricing power of
walmart/walmarts suppliers behind it, which is good and bad. sams
typically carries more low-end stuff, because they have established
relationships with suppliers like GE, sylvania, etc.

nothing wrong with that, of course. a 32" GE television should last as
long as a 32" sony.


>
>
>>It does save a lot of money if you
>>shop it properly, know your prices, and especially if you are a small
>>business owner.
>
>
> True. The other thing a lot of folks don't realize is that they carry
> lots of stuff you just won't find anywhere else, at least not locally.
> Gourmet foods, etc. Sam's has a terrific huge chocolate bundt cake
> that costs a mere 5 bucks. I always take it for potlucks - the trick
> is to take it outta the plastic container and put it on a paper plate
> so everyone thinks you made it from scratch. People are always
> begging me for the recipe. I tell them it's a secret.
>
>
>>As far as credit cards, I don't even know how Sam's
>>handles this issue.
>
>
> Sam's takes only Discover or its own card (your membership card can
> double as a credit card). They used to take Mastercard, pretty
> annoying that they stopped.

i think they take whatever co-branded walmart card is available as well.

i shop both, and each has their advantages/disatvantages. kinda funny,
tho- there are a sams and costco back to back in torrance, CA. ive
shopped both. the sams only gets busy on the weekend after 6pm, when
costco closes. sams also is open more days, as well. walmart employees
apparently dont get to enjoy holidays ;)

Bill 2

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 2:16:53 PM2/11/05
to
The dairy cartel in my area of Canada has recently increased the fixed price
of milk to $6.51 for 4 liters... so about $4.98USD /US gallon. That price is
fixed so it will never be any cheaper or any higher (until the next forced
price increase)


"Wooly" <nob...@nun.ya> wrote in message
news:9ulp01h3k9ppvd0l7...@4ax.com...

m...@privacy.net

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 2:21:21 PM2/11/05
to
>and they've got giant $$$ saving
>packages of solid white canned tuna (the good stuff)

Costco has a good deal on canned salmon as well

Jessica V.

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 2:40:39 PM2/11/05
to

There isn't a Costco here, but there is a Sam's Club. My membership fee
is $35 a year. Well worth it IMO, as annual savings over the best
prices elsewhere usually amounts to several thousand dollars a year
between home and business purchases. I can't remember what it was but
there was a single item purchase last year where Sam's Club was $350
less than the lowest price I could find for whatever it was elsewhere.

Jessica

ra...@vt.edu

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 2:57:56 PM2/11/05
to
diddy <di...@nospam.diddy.net> wrote:
> in thread news:Kb4Pd.46407$iC4....@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com: "Tock"
> <to...@sbcglobal.net> whittled the following words:

> > I still don't like the idea of having to pay $45 for the privilege of
> > shopping in somebody's store, but a friend suggested that would be a
> > good place to go for stuff like paper towels and TP & other cleaning
> > stuff. Well, I went yesterday, and it was like Christmas . . .

> No way, no how. Do you have an Aldi's close around?


> I'm NOT going to buy any store memberships. EVER

No Costco near me, but my wife runs a small business and Sam's Club
is worth the membership fee. Things like paper bags and cleaning
supplies are much cheaper there than any retail store or even the
wholesale distributors who deliver. You do have to watch your prices
because occasionally you will find some stuff is just as cheap or
cheaper in a local grocery, but in general it's more than worth
the fee. For day-to-day personal shopping I would not bother
because even though I know it might be cheaper I don't need a 5 gallon
bucket-o-peanut-butter, or whatever, for my home use.

Bill Ranck
Blacksburg, Va.

barbie gee

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 3:04:38 PM2/11/05
to
Tock wrote:

> Only thing is . . . they don't take any credit cards other than American
> Express, which they didn't tell me until after the lady at the cash register
> had rung everything up. But a trip to the ATM machine fixed that . . .

why can't you just swipe your debit card?
ours takes either AE, or any debit card at all...

Ariane Jenkins

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 3:56:13 PM2/11/05
to
On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 15:29:46 GMT, Tock <to...@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

Yeah, a lot of people have problems with that. Me, I'm fine with it,
as long as I make the money back in savings, which we do. If we didn't, then
I could see being irked about the membership fee. It sounds like you've
already found some worthwhile savings, so I wouldn't sweat it. ;)

Ariane

Steve

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 4:17:18 PM2/11/05
to
"Jessica V." <n...@spam.com> wrote:
>There isn't a Costco here, but there is a Sam's Club. My membership fee
>is $35 a year. Well worth it IMO, as annual savings over the best
>prices elsewhere usually amounts to several thousand dollars a year
>between home and business purchases.

Plus, both Sam's and Costco make it very easy to return stuff, mostly
with no time limits.

Isosceles

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 4:30:48 PM2/11/05
to
On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 15:29:46 GMT, "Tock" <to...@sbcglobal.net> posted

Just the yearly savings accrued in gasoline purchases alone justifies
the membership fee for me.

bear...@cruller.invalid

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 4:35:05 PM2/11/05
to
In article <cuitbh$l7v$1...@fair.qualcomm.com>, mie...@iwon.com (Mieko)
wrote:

>
> Well I pay $100 for the executive membership and the amex card, but I
> get cash back twice a year - once for the amex on everything I buy
> (over $250 this year) and one for the executive membership on
> everything I buy at Costco (don't remember how much this one was, but
> I'm pretty sure it was more than $100.)

That's what we do, too. Unfortunately, where we are moving there is no
Costco, so we'll probably sell our membership to one of our Costco-less
friends before we go. BTW, for all you people who would like to shop
there, but don't want to buy a membership, find someone you know who
shops there. Members are issued two cards and can sell you one for half
the membership fee without you having to sign anything. I know quite a
few people who've done this.

BTW--at least for the Exec. membership--Costco guarantees that you will
save more than the annual membership fee IIRC. If you don't, they
refund the excess fee or discount the subsequent years' membership,
customer's choice. I forget how they figure whether you've got your
money's worth, but when we got our card they explained it to me and it
seemed straightforward and reasonable. It was the first (and certainly
not the last) indication of their honesty in dealing with customers.

Even though we don't shop there often, we still easily recovered the
cost of membership and got money back both on our Costco/Amex purchases
and Amex purchases alone. All around a very good deal. Costco is one of
the many things I'm going to miss around here.

Bob Ward

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 5:06:38 PM2/11/05
to
On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 10:59:16 -0500, Serendipity <goa...@spammers.com>
wrote:

>
>Sam's: Anyway, with Sam's sometimes there are special hours set aside
>just for certain members so we get to shop without the crowds. We also
>get discounts. This in itself basically pays for our membership and the
>rest of the savings is gravy. Check to see if Costco's does the same.
>I'm sure they do. Take a business card with you so they have it on
>record. When we first signed up at Sam's we had to be a member of a
>credit union or a business owner. It does save a lot of money if you
>shop it properly, know your prices, and especially if you are a small
>business owner. As far as credit cards, I don't even know how Sam's
>handles this issue. We pay by cash or cheque; no hassles for using a
>cheque either! They have a cash machine so we can always get cash from
>our account. We prefer shopping with cash only anyway. Sam's is now in
>Canada but we prefer a US Sam's as it is closer. In general, clean
>supplies are really cheap as are some food items. We saved a lot at
>Christmas which more than paid for our membership.


If you are getting cash from the ATM at Sam's Club, you are paying ATM
fees. If you are getting CASH from your CREDIT cards at ATMs, you are
paying cash advance fees. If you pay with your debit card at Sam's
Club, you pay no ATM fees, no cash advance fees, and you can request
additional cash back at the register.


Serendipity

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 6:52:48 PM2/11/05
to
Bob Ward wrote:

No fees for our cash at the cash machine, sorry. Otherwise, we would
simply take cash. Of course, on the US side they may have charges but
we certainly do no have any charges for withdrawls on our account. YMMV
>
>

sou...@nospam.com

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 7:32:58 PM2/11/05
to
California prohibits retailers from selling milk below cost.

--
To reply via e-mail please delete 1 c from paccbell

sou...@nospam.com

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 7:34:38 PM2/11/05
to
Rod Speed wrote:
> Steve <r...@qhd.inv> wrote in message
> news:6qqp01lqita2u3add...@4ax.com...
>
>>Serendipity <goa...@spammers.com> wrote
>
>
>>>Hey Tock :) We have a membership at Sam's. One of our
>>>kids have a membership at Costco's. So we kind of share.
>>>BTW, the way these warehouse stores keep costs down is
>>>not only their design but because the general public cannot
>>>shop there and they are geared to a certain clientele.
>
>
>>I read somewhere that the design stuff is a myth - the
>>industrial look actually costs more than most retail stores.
>
>
> Bet that was just the spew of some mindless journalist.
>
> Cant see how the industrial look that involves a bare concrete
> floor, all the goods on pallets where the customers get the
> goods off the pallets, with the building in a low rent area,
> with the operation having a restricted range of products
> can be more expensive than most full supermarkets.


The Costco stores in parts of the San Fernando Valley are anything
but low rent areas.

diddy

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 7:37:13 PM2/11/05
to
in thread news:_8cPd.4229$ZZ....@newssvr23.news.prodigy.net:
sou...@nospam.com whittled the following words:

Cost to the farmer? or to the store?
The store is making money. Farmers would lose money, if it weren't for
Government subsidies

Rod Speed

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 7:50:41 PM2/11/05
to

<sou...@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:yacPd.4230$ZZ....@newssvr23.news.prodigy.net...

> Rod Speed wrote:
>> Steve <r...@qhd.inv> wrote in message
>> news:6qqp01lqita2u3add...@4ax.com...
>>
>>>Serendipity <goa...@spammers.com> wrote
>>
>>
>>>>Hey Tock :) We have a membership at Sam's. One of our
>>>>kids have a membership at Costco's. So we kind of share.
>>>>BTW, the way these warehouse stores keep costs down is
>>>>not only their design but because the general public cannot
>>>>shop there and they are geared to a certain clientele.
>>
>>
>>>I read somewhere that the design stuff is a myth - the
>>>industrial look actually costs more than most retail stores.
>>
>>
>> Bet that was just the spew of some mindless journalist.
>>
>> Cant see how the industrial look that involves a bare concrete
>> floor, all the goods on pallets where the customers get the
>> goods off the pallets, with the building in a low rent area,
>> with the operation having a restricted range of products
>> can be more expensive than most full supermarkets.
>
>
> The Costco stores in parts of the San Fernando Valley are anything but low
> rent areas.

The other stuff still saves their costs.

sou...@nospam.com

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 7:44:53 PM2/11/05
to


Cost to the retailer.

Message has been deleted

sou...@nospam.com

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 8:19:52 PM2/11/05
to
diddy wrote:
> in thread news:9kcPd.4056$aW6...@newssvr22.news.prodigy.net:
> At $1.89 a gallon the store is NOT selling below cost to the retailer.
>

I never said they were. I said that in California the retailer can
not sell milk below their cost.

Maren Purves

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 9:08:06 PM2/11/05
to
Chloe wrote:
> "Wooly" <nob...@nun.ya> wrote in message
> news:9ulp01h3k9ppvd0l7...@4ax.com...
>
>>What I wouldn't give for $1.89/gal milk. I'm paying anywhere from
>>$3.59-4.29 per gallon. We go through 6-8 gallons weekly...
>>
>>On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 09:54:45 -0600, diddy <di...@nospam.diddy.net>
>>spewed forth :
>>
>>>Milk is still expensive at $1.89 a gallon, but since Walmart has milk at
>>>$3 something, it's still a bargain.
>
> In my recent interstate move, I learned that state law has a lot to do with
> regulating milk prices.

I find it a challenge to get milk below $4/gallon these days ...
($6-7 is normal).
Good thing we only use 1-2 gallons/week.

dane

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 9:43:24 PM2/11/05
to
"Maren Purves" <m.pu...@jach.hawaii.edu> wrote in message
news:cujoe7$jpk$2...@news.hawaii.edu...

Where do you live ? In Pennsyvania the milk marketing board sets minimum
prices and most supermarkets sell at the minimum retail price. For Feb, 2005
it is $3.05 for a gallon of whole milk. I cross the Delaware to buy milk for
$1.11 a half gallon at Halo Farms Dairy in Lawrenceville, NJ.


Godzilla Pimp

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 9:52:03 PM2/11/05
to

"Tock" <to...@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:Kb4Pd.46407$iC4....@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...

>I still don't like the idea of having to pay $45 for the privilege of
>shopping in somebody's store,

It keeps costs down because it keeps out blacks, children and other
shoplifters. Besides, what kind of dumb nigger is going to try to shoplift a
canoe, trampoline or 60" TV?

BTW, I don't think I've ever seen a non-white at Sam's Club. It's about 99%
middle-aged and old white folks. The other 1% is young whites.

GP


thunder

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 11:03:53 PM2/11/05
to
> Only thing is . . . they don't take any credit cards other than American
> Express, which they didn't tell me until after the lady at the cash
> register had rung everything up. But a trip to the ATM machine fixed
> that . . .


They accept your ATM card. Just slide it through the machine and enter you
PIN.


thunder

unread,
Feb 11, 2005, 11:02:57 PM2/11/05
to

> I find it a challenge to get milk below $4/gallon these days ...
> ($6-7 is normal).
> Good thing we only use 1-2 gallons/week.

On an average week it goes for about $2.50 here in Cincinnati, Ohio, but
with Kroger and Meijer battling over customers they have big sales or loss
leaders. This week milk is going for $1.47 a gallon at Meijer.


Bob Ward

unread,
Feb 12, 2005, 12:10:21 AM2/12/05
to
On Sat, 12 Feb 2005 04:03:53 GMT, "thunder" <thu...@cinci.rr.com>
wrote:

Actually, they accept your VISA or Mastercard branded debit card,
which may or may not function as an ATM card. Some people prefer to
have an ATM card that functions only as an ATM card in an actual ATM
requiring a PIN, rather than at a point-of-sale terminal where the PIN
is not always required.


The Real Bev

unread,
Feb 12, 2005, 12:42:59 AM2/12/05
to
Tock wrote:
>
> I still don't like the idea of having to pay $45 for the privilege of
> shopping in somebody's store, but a friend suggested that would be a good
> place to go for stuff like paper towels and TP & other cleaning stuff.
> Well, I went yesterday, and it was like Christmas . . .
> Besides stuff like TP (I got the giant rolls) and other stuff, they had the
> perfect table for the breakroom ($99), and they've got giant $$$ saving
> packages of solid white canned tuna (the good stuff) and the almonds I've
> been buying from Kroger in the little 3 oz bags for $1.39, I can now get 3
> lb bags for $10 (better than half price). Got a bunch of latex gloves
> (gotta have 'em for shaving customers) 300 for $10, while Home Depot charges
> $6 for 100. Pretty cool.

I love Costco. Some stuff is a bargain, some isn't, but it's certainly
worth the price. You can split the cost with a friend -- doesn't have
to be a live-in relative or anything -- who will get his own card. The
official member is the only one who gets the coupons, though.

> Only thing is . . . they don't take any credit cards other than American
> Express, which they didn't tell me until after the lady at the cash register
> had rung everything up. But a trip to the ATM machine fixed that . . .

How much was the fee for getting your own money?



> Pretty cool . . . I'm not gonna get an AE card -- I can adjust to paying
> with cash, but I still don't like the idea of paying to shop in someone's
> store . . .

Get the card, you get a 1% rebate (some people who signed up previously
get 2%) on everything you buy there or anywhere else and increased
percentages on some other things. Other cards give you back 5% on
stuff from grocery stores, drugstores and gas stations. They REALLY
want to hook us on charging stuff that nobody would have thought of
charging a decade ago.

--
Cheers,
Bev
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"Why put fault tolerance in the OS, when it's already built
into the User?" -- Steve Shaw, regarding Win95

Dennis P. Harris

unread,
Feb 12, 2005, 12:47:22 AM2/12/05
to
On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 15:29:46 GMT in misc.consumers.frugal-living,
"Tock" <to...@sbcglobal.net> wrote:

> Pretty cool . . . I'm not gonna get an AE card -- I can adjust to paying
> with cash, but I still don't like the idea of paying to shop in someone's
> store . . .

You save that membership fee pretty quickly if you buy much. If
you're a business member, you can get a Costco credit card, and
you pay Costco when the statement arrives (at least my employer
does!). Several company employees have cards and we get a single
statement. It does help that our local Costco is only a block
away from our office...

A lot of our local businesses shop there for cleaning supplies,
food service supplies, batteries, basic office supplies. Local
small restaurants buy meat & veg there too.

I make my membership fee back the first time I stock up the
cheese box in my fridge --- they have a reasonable selection and
fantastic prices. As a single person, their meat packages are
too huge unless I'm throwing a party, but I go there for things
like basic olive oil and canned tomatoes.

For a barber shop, you can save a lot on paper products there.

Oh, and a suggestion: Any real barber shop needs a bunch of
magazine subscriptions. My local shop has the New Yorker,
Harper's, and the Wall St. Journal, as well as the local
newspaper. What magazines/papers do you have in your shop?


Tock

unread,
Feb 12, 2005, 1:26:32 AM2/12/05
to

"barbie gee" <barbi...@myob.com> wrote in message
news:cuj34m$2qk$2...@ftupet.com...


What debit card?
-Tock


Tock

unread,
Feb 12, 2005, 1:31:21 AM2/12/05
to

"The Real Bev" <bas...@myrealbox.com> wrote in message
news:420D9763...@myrealbox.com...
> Tock wrote:

>> Only thing is . . . they don't take any credit cards other than American
>> Express, which they didn't tell me until after the lady at the cash
>> register
>> had rung everything up. But a trip to the ATM machine fixed that . . .
>
> How much was the fee for getting your own money?

75 cents. I pulled out $300, so that works out to .25%. Not good, and I
probably won't do it again (my credit union's ATM gives me my $$$ for free),
but I had a big basket full of bargains, and I really wanted it . . .

-Tock


Tock

unread,
Feb 12, 2005, 1:45:45 AM2/12/05
to

"Dennis P. Harris" <NO_SPAM_T...@gci.net> wrote

> Oh, and a suggestion: Any real barber shop needs a bunch of
> magazine subscriptions. My local shop has the New Yorker,
> Harper's, and the Wall St. Journal, as well as the local
> newspaper. What magazines/papers do you have in your shop?

I haven't subscribed to any yet. When I do, I'll probably get a sports
mag, one for cooking, dogs, gay issues, Consumer Reports, Writer's Digest,
national news, NASCAR, travel, bicycling, something for UFO's and
paranormal, the Weekly World News, and the local daily newspaper.
Well, maybe not all those; depends on how much they'll all cost. I don't
intend to open up a library . . .
I understand that some publishers send any business with a waiting room free
subscriptions, so that should help fill up my magazine rack (which I bought
for $5 at a going-out-of-business sale). Some publishers keep sending out
magazines even after the subscription expires. Ya, my sub for Electronic
Musician expired three addresses ago, and they keep hunting me down and
sending the stuff.

That's one of the things I'll figure out later . . . until then, since
business will be slow anyway, the daily newspaper will suffice.

Turns out I needed to get a 6 foot wide (7 feet tall) bookcase (long story),
so I'll be able to do a book exchange for the customers. Even if no one
wants to exchange books, it'll still look good.
Had the antique dealer deliver my shoe shine stand today, and he was
impressed with what I've done with the place so far. Hmm . . . for the
price of what a franchised hair joint (Supercuts/Procuts) would have charged
me for a shop, I've got my own shop that's light years better, if I do say
so myself . . .

-Tock


Bob Ward

unread,
Feb 12, 2005, 1:52:21 AM2/12/05
to
On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 21:42:59 -0800, The Real Bev
<bas...@myrealbox.com> wrote:

>
>I love Costco. Some stuff is a bargain, some isn't, but it's certainly
>worth the price. You can split the cost with a friend -- doesn't have
>to be a live-in relative or anything -- who will get his own card. The
>official member is the only one who gets the coupons, though.


The "official member" is the only one with a moneyback guarantee on
the membership fees, too - the freeloader can't cash in half the
membership.


Message has been deleted

C. Massey

unread,
Feb 12, 2005, 10:07:24 AM2/12/05
to

"Tock" <to...@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:tChPd.8651$D34....@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...

>
> "Dennis P. Harris" <NO_SPAM_T...@gci.net> wrote
>
> > Oh, and a suggestion: Any real barber shop needs a bunch of
> > magazine subscriptions. My local shop has the New Yorker,
> > Harper's, and the Wall St. Journal, as well as the local
> > newspaper. What magazines/papers do you have in your shop?
>
> I haven't subscribed to any yet. When I do, I'll probably get a sports
> mag, one for cooking, dogs, gay issues, Consumer Reports, Writer's Digest,
> national news, NASCAR, travel, bicycling, something for UFO's and
> paranormal, the Weekly World News, and the local daily newspaper.
> Well, maybe not all those; depends on how much they'll all cost. I don't
> intend to open up a library . . .

<snip>

Well, if you get the NASCAR magazines in, I will be there for a haircut
monthly, even though you are making me drive from SW Ft. Worth!

Where did you say the shop is again?


Chuck


Message has been deleted

Buttercup

unread,
Feb 12, 2005, 11:32:13 AM2/12/05
to
Dennis wrote:

> On Fri, 11 Feb 2005 16:07:58 GMT, Wooly <nob...@nun.ya> wrote:
>
>
>>What I wouldn't give for $1.89/gal milk. I'm paying anywhere from
>>$3.59-4.29 per gallon. We go through 6-8 gallons weekly...
>
>
> Oddly enough, the little quicky-mart/gas station down the road from us
> has milk cheaper than the supermarkets ($2.75/gal vs. $3.25-4.00/gal).
> Might be worth a look in your area.
>

The cheapest place we can get milk around here (southern IN) is at CVS
drug store with the shopper's card. It's the only thing we ever buy at
CVS, so I don't care if they track my milk purchases. I go directly
across the street rom there for my presecriptions.

--
CC

Why does there only have to be one correct philosophy? I don't want to
go and follow you just to end up like on of them and why are you always
telling me what you want me to believe? I'd like to think that I can go
my own way and meet you in the end.
--Hoobastank "Same Direction"

Tock

unread,
Feb 12, 2005, 12:09:35 PM2/12/05
to

"C. Massey" <ch...@host.invalid> wrote

> Well, if you get the NASCAR magazines in, I will be there for a haircut
> monthly, even though you are making me drive from SW Ft. Worth!
>
> Where did you say the shop is again?
> Chuck


It's in Richardson, on Coit between Belt Line & Arapahoe, right under the
big bank tower. Can't miss it.
I'll give a holler when the NASCAR mags come in . . .
-Tock


Tock

unread,
Feb 12, 2005, 12:17:14 PM2/12/05
to

"diddy" <di...@nospam.diddy.net> wrote in message
news:Xns95FB674...@216.196.97.142...
> in thread news:MYoPd.46576$iC4....@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com: "C.
> Massey" <ch...@host.invalid> whittled the following words:

>
>> "Tock" <to...@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
>> news:tChPd.8651$D34....@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
>>>
>>> "Dennis P. Harris" <NO_SPAM_T...@gci.net> wrote
>>>
>>> > Oh, and a suggestion: Any real barber shop needs a bunch of
>>> > magazine subscriptions. My local shop has the New Yorker,
>>> > Harper's, and the Wall St. Journal, as well as the local
>>> > newspaper. What magazines/papers do you have in your shop?
>>>
>>> I haven't subscribed to any yet. When I do, I'll probably get a
>>> sports mag, one for cooking, dogs, gay issues, Consumer Reports,
>>> Writer's Digest, national news, NASCAR, travel, bicycling, something
>>> for UFO's and paranormal, the Weekly World News, and the local daily
>>> newspaper. Well, maybe not all those; depends on how much they'll all
>>> cost. I don't intend to open up a library . . .
>>
>
> Do you do women? I'll read the ones on dogs, nascar, reader's digest and
> cooking

There's a few women's cuts I can do; layer cuts, blunt cuts, and something
called a 180. That's a cut that leaves your hair looking like we held you
upside down and ran a weed-wacker across everything that hung down . . .
but, I can get that same effect while you relax in my unfrugal $1800 barber
chair. When it's done, your hair is left in gradually increasing layers
from the top down, and looks pretty good, lets ya have what looks like long
hair without it actually being long. Recommended for hot weather. I'll
have a few manikins done so you can see what it looks like.

Bring along a wad of cash, I'll have a table for poker and dominos in the
back . . .

-Tock


suzn

unread,
Feb 12, 2005, 12:30:41 PM2/12/05
to

"Tock" <to...@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:Kb4Pd.46407$iC4....@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...

>
> Only thing is . . . they don't take any credit cards other than American
> Express, which they didn't tell me until after the lady at the cash
> register had rung everything up. But a trip to the ATM machine fixed
> that . . .
>
> Pretty cool . . . I'm not gonna get an AE card -- I can adjust to paying
> with cash, but I still don't like the idea of paying to shop in someone's
> store . . .


They take debit cards Tock, if you have one.


C. Massey

unread,
Feb 12, 2005, 12:57:42 PM2/12/05
to

"Tock" <to...@sbcglobal.net> wrote in message
news:uSqPd.46598$iC4....@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...

<snip>


> Bring along a wad of cash, I'll have a table for poker and dominos in the
> back . . .
>

OK... it's gonna take me an hour or longer to get there, but you keep making
it more enticing!


Tock

unread,
Feb 12, 2005, 3:02:49 PM2/12/05
to

"C. Massey" <ch...@host.invalid> wrote in message
news:qsrPd.29361$wi2....@newssvr11.news.prodigy.com...

" . . . said the fly to the spider . . ."
-Tock (lol)


imascot

unread,
Feb 12, 2005, 4:11:15 PM2/12/05
to
In article <Kb4Pd.46407$iC4....@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com>,
to...@sbcglobal.net says...

> Pretty cool . . . I'm not gonna get an AE card -- I can adjust to paying
> with cash, but I still don't like the idea of paying to shop in someone's
> store . . .
>
> --Tock
>
>
Tock, the AE/Costco card has a cashback feature. We use ours for
everything we can, and it all adds up. This month we're getting the
2004 rebate of around $200.00 (It more than covers the Costco annual
fee.)

J.

--
"The price of freedom is eternal vigilance."
-- Thomas Jefferson, founder of the former United States of America

SoCalMike

unread,
Feb 12, 2005, 7:37:43 PM2/12/05
to
imascot wrote:
> In article <Kb4Pd.46407$iC4....@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com>,
> to...@sbcglobal.net says...
>
>>Pretty cool . . . I'm not gonna get an AE card -- I can adjust to paying
>>with cash, but I still don't like the idea of paying to shop in someone's
>>store . . .
>>
>>--Tock
>>
>>
>
> Tock, the AE/Costco card has a cashback feature. We use ours for
> everything we can, and it all adds up. This month we're getting the
> 2004 rebate of around $200.00 (It more than covers the Costco annual
> fee.)
>
> J.
>
im getting... $14.57

which is $14.57 more than id have gotten paying via ATM. the AMEX is
paid in full each month thru online banking, so its free money.