cotton mattress (not pad)

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Wander Woman

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Nov 18, 2003, 5:57:42 PM11/18/03
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Hello,

Looking for a product, can't find one anywhere but assume
there is such a thing out there,,,,,,a cotton or polyester mattress,
maybe 3 inches thick, that could be rolled up and stashed away.
We sleep on the floor, Asian style, and would like to hide away
this mattress when not in use, and get more use out of our room.
Any ideas? We are currently using a camping Thermorest.


hchi...@hotmail.com

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Nov 18, 2003, 6:38:30 PM11/18/03
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"Wander Woman" <el...@televar.com> wrote:

Try foam instead. 3" "firm" foam should do the trick. 3" medium foam, which
is what a foam store might try to sell you, will feel great for about 1/2 hour
and then collapse on the pressure points.

Chotii

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Nov 18, 2003, 6:56:18 PM11/18/03
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"Wander Woman" <el...@televar.com> wrote in message
news:Gtxub.275$ss....@bcandid.telisphere.com...

Plenty of companies selling such a futon. See:

http://www.soaringheart.com/category.cfm?topCategory=naturalbeds&category=xlayers

http://www.tonkatinkers.com/futontk3.htm (organic cotton - more expensive)

http://www.dragonmama.com/futonspillows.html

http://www.hanas-generation.com/futons.html#Organic%20Futons


It does appear that you will need a doctor's note to order an all-cotton
futon, because of fire danger. Mixed-fiber (especially wool) may be ordered
at will.

--angela


George

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Nov 18, 2003, 7:02:00 PM11/18/03
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"Wander Woman" <el...@televar.com> wrote in message
news:Gtxub.275$ss....@bcandid.telisphere.com...
I know Japanese use futons if they don't use a bed. The one you sleep on is
called a "shiki futon" and the one you use as a blanket is called a "kake
futon". The "shiki futon" is used because it is easy to roll up but is not
3" thick. Typically they use an additional mattress pad under the futon that
is ~3" thick but it is bulkier and can't be rolled up but is folded instead.

I did a quick Google on "shiki futon" and found this and also the pad:

http://www.jlifeinternational.com/houseitems/futon/shikifuton/shikifuton_e.h
tml


The most common mats are "tatami" but they are made from a type of grass.

Arri London

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Nov 18, 2003, 8:33:13 PM11/18/03
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They are called futons. But they might not be very popular any more. A
very 80s thing.
Maybe Cost Plus would have them?

Michael Black

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Nov 18, 2003, 11:12:21 PM11/18/03
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Tom Quackenbush (tqua...@kingcon.com) writes:
> Have you considered a helium-filled air mattress? Pull off the
> blankets and it floats to the ceiling. <g> That's an idea that's been
> stuck in my head since I first read _Around the World in 80 Days_ as a
> kid.
>
Doesn't helium have smaller molecules or something, so something that
stays airtight might not stay helium tight? Somewhere, I've picked up
something like that.

Michael

George

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Nov 19, 2003, 8:07:22 AM11/19/03
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"Michael Black" <et...@FreeNet.Carleton.CA> wrote in message
news:bpeqj5$lih$1...@freenet9.carleton.ca...
> Tom Quackenbush (tqua...@kingcon.com) writes:

> Doesn't helium have smaller molecules or something, so something that
> stays airtight might not stay helium tight? Somewhere, I've picked up
> something like that.

It is the smallest gas molecule and is often used in manufacturing for leak
testing. So an item that holds "air" may not do so well with helium.


>
> Michael
>


Wander Woman

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Nov 19, 2003, 4:31:12 PM11/19/03
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Thank you, Angela, for your reply. Good sites. And now group,,,,,
does anyone have an opinion on which they like best,,,,cotton or wool...
to sleep on?


"Chotii" <res0...@verizon.outdamnedspam.net> wrote in message
news:Ckyub.1208626$Id.1...@news.easynews.com...

Chotii

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Nov 19, 2003, 6:33:00 PM11/19/03
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"Wander Woman" <el...@televar.com> wrote in message
news:AiRub.280$ss....@bcandid.telisphere.com...

> "Chotii" <res0...@verizon.outdamnedspam.net> wrote in message
> news:Ckyub.1208626$Id.1...@news.easynews.com...
> >
> > "Wander Woman" <el...@televar.com> wrote in message
> > news:Gtxub.275$ss....@bcandid.telisphere.com...
> > > Hello,
> > >
> > > Looking for a product, can't find one anywhere but assume
> > > there is such a thing out there,,,,,,a cotton or polyester mattress,
> > > maybe 3 inches thick, that could be rolled up and stashed away.
> > > We sleep on the floor, Asian style, and would like to hide away
> > > this mattress when not in use, and get more use out of our room.
> > > Any ideas? We are currently using a camping Thermorest.
> >
> > Plenty of companies selling such a futon. See:
> >
> >
>
http://www.soaringheart.com/category.cfm?topCategory=naturalbeds&category=xlayers
> >
> > http://www.tonkatinkers.com/futontk3.htm (organic cotton - more
expensive)
> >
> > http://www.dragonmama.com/futonspillows.html
> >
> > http://www.hanas-generation.com/futons.html#Organic%20Futons
> >
> >
> > It does appear that you will need a doctor's note to order an all-cotton
> > futon, because of fire danger. Mixed-fiber (especially wool) may be
> ordered
> > at will.

> Thank you, Angela, for your reply. Good sites. And now group,,,,,
> does anyone have an opinion on which they like best,,,,cotton or wool...
> to sleep on?

I've never slept on a wool mattress, but I *have* slept on a wool-batting
pillow, and I can report it to still has some spring to it several years
later. This is more than I can say for most cotton futons I have sat or
slept on, once they get packed down. Wool also will not burn the way cotton
will, does not grow mold the way cotton does, and if I were buying a futon,
it would be wool. However, if allergies were an issue, I might have to make
other choices.

--angela


James Lee Johnson

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Nov 20, 2003, 5:44:18 AM11/20/03
to

"Wander Woman" <el...@televar.com> wrote in message
news:AiRub.280$ss....@bcandid.telisphere.com...

> Thank you, Angela, for your reply. Good sites. And now group,,,,,
> does anyone have an opinion on which they like best,,,,cotton or wool...
> to sleep on?

Hi Wander Woman,

Cotton is notorious for packing down. That is why the innerspring mattress
was invented! Good furniture was stuffed with horsehair in previous days.
Cotton is never used for more that a thin layer in good bedding or
furniture. Believe me, your Thermarest camping matresses are far superior
to a cotton futon, at least after a couple of months of use. Cotton futons
are for the interminably hip and the Japanese.

I'm surprised you have had trouble finding floor mattresses. Futons, "Bed
in a bag"s, and various other mattresses intended for use on the floor or
platforms are readily available. For the past couple of years my wife and I
have been building a house and we have been sleeping on a queen size air
mattress. These are a definite improvement in comfort over our Thermarest
camping mattresses. The latest, and best, has a built in pump and cost
about $40 at Sam's Club. Definitely a bedding bargain. However, these are
bothersome to deflate and inflate, and thus impractical for your use, unless
you have somewhere to store one without deflating it.

We recently bought a 2" TempSoma memory foam queen mattress pad at Sam's
Club for $110. This has done wonders to make our ancient innerspring set
sleepable. I don't think the pad is firm enough to make a bed by itself for
long term use, but I think it would be quite comfortable with another firm &
dense 2" foam underneath it. Note that density refers to the weight of the
foam and firmness to how much it deflects. A denser foam will hold its
shape for a longer time. Supposedly the best material for a mattress is
Latex foam made with the Talalay process. However, it is more expensive
that urethane foam, so the long term payout may not be there. Also, some
people are allergic to Latex rubber. Do a google.com search on "cotton
polyester foam latex" and I bet you'll learn alot. (Leave the quotes off).

I plan to make my own multilayer foam mattress using what I have learned.
I'll report back to this group when I get it done.

Best Wishes.

jj


Arri London

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Nov 20, 2003, 7:36:58 PM11/20/03
to
>
> "Wander Woman" <el...@televar.com> wrote in message
> news:AiRub.280$ss....@bcandid.telisphere.com...
> > Thank you, Angela, for your reply. Good sites. And now group,,,,,
> > does anyone have an opinion on which they like best,,,,cotton or wool...
> > to sleep on?
>
>

Wool is too allergenic for me. Cotton poses less of a problem. Check how
many layers the futon is, and what the layers are made from. There are
so many possibilities as to firmness.

All natural fibre futons will need shaking, turning and the occasional
pounding to keep their shape. The futon shop will tell you the best way
to care for them. Don't forget to vacuum them occasionally just as you
would any mattress.

Michael Black

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Nov 20, 2003, 11:45:11 PM11/20/03
to

I've had a cotton futon since 1985, and while I really ought to replace
it, it's been fine to sleep on all these years.

Traditionally, a futon is cotton. I'd never heard of the flammability issue,
but I have heard of them being filled partially with foam to make it "more
comfortable". I'm not realy sure you have a futon if it it's filled with
something else, though you do have that same ability to roll it up when
it's in the way.

Michael

Arri London

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Nov 21, 2003, 8:44:57 PM11/21/03
to
Michael Black wrote:
>
> Arri London (bio...@ic.ac.uk) writes:
> >>
> >> "Wander Woman" <el...@televar.com> wrote in message
> >> news:AiRub.280$ss....@bcandid.telisphere.com...
> >> > Thank you, Angela, for your reply. Good sites. And now group,,,,,
> >> > does anyone have an opinion on which they like best,,,,cotton or wool...
> >> > to sleep on?
> >>
> >>
> >
> > Wool is too allergenic for me. Cotton poses less of a problem. Check how
> > many layers the futon is, and what the layers are made from. There are
> > so many possibilities as to firmness.
> >
> > All natural fibre futons will need shaking, turning and the occasional
> > pounding to keep their shape. The futon shop will tell you the best way
> > to care for them. Don't forget to vacuum them occasionally just as you
> > would any mattress.
>
> I've had a cotton futon since 1985, and while I really ought to replace
> it, it's been fine to sleep on all these years.

True. Some of the ones I've slept on as guests had never been turned or
shaken, so they were a little lumpy. The cotton ones belonging to my
Japanese friends were never lumpy, as they took good care of them.

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