Tighten the miniscope

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Maria Fernanda Niño Uribe

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Mar 28, 2022, 9:32:33 AMMar 28
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Hello everyone

Right now I’m doing an experiment in which the mice needs to explore the environment after a few seconds of disorientation, the place is a  dark cylinder  with no visual cues, the problem that I’m having is that after the attachment of the miniscope my mice doesn’t move spontaneously or in a freely natural way, I wanted to know if someone has had a similar problem with the use of the miniscope, how do you usually tight the miniscope to the headpiece? do you anesthetized the animals or do you use a external animal devices to do this?  or maybe some of  you know how to induce or increase spontaneous locomotion in mice? or how to make the attachment of the miniscope in a  less stressful way?  Thank you so much

Susie Yu Feng

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Mar 28, 2022, 10:10:58 AMMar 28
to Maria Fernanda Niño Uribe, Miniscope
Hi Maria,

Are you saying to need to attach the miniscope in a completely dark space? If so, that will be a little challenging to place it consistently every time. If possible, will you be able to attach the scope in a bright place then transfer the animal into the testing environment?

In terms of tricks to attach the scope, in our lab, we normally use the non-dominant hand to hold the baseplate (index finger and thumb), and then the dominant hand to grab the scope and attach it to the baseplate. Once in, let go of the baseplate, and use the non-dominant hand to grab the whole scope with slight pressure to hold the scope in place. Lastly, use your dominant hand to grab the screwdriver and tighten the scope in place. When it comes to the super-aggressive animal, we sometimes have 2 people, 1 shape their hand like a cone shape and fix the animal in there with one a part of head out of the hand. The other one is in charge of the attach the scope and tightening it in place.

Best,
Susie

On Mon, Mar 28, 2022 at 9:32 AM Maria Fernanda Niño Uribe <maf.n...@gmail.com> wrote:
Hello everyone

Right now I’m doing an experiment in which the mice needs to explore the environment after a few seconds of disorientation, the place is a  dark cylinder  with no visual cues, the problem that I’m having is that after the attachment of the miniscope my mice doesn’t move spontaneously or in a freely natural way, I wanted to know if someone has had a similar problem with the use of the miniscope, how do you usually tight the miniscope to the headpiece? do you anesthetized the animals or do you use a external animal devices to do this?  or maybe some of  you know how to induce or increase spontaneous locomotion in mice? or how to make the attachment of the miniscope in a  less stressful way?  Thank you so much

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Maria Fernanda Niño Uribe

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Apr 3, 2022, 4:51:41 PMApr 3
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Hello sussie 

Thank you so much for your answer and sorry for this late response, were gonna try to apply your technique by holding the head base plate and then try to attach the scope with a lamp near to us, we were using a tube shape device with an open part in the head to constrain the animal while another one was trying to attach the miniscope. We will see if your technique suit us better, and once again thank you so much 

Best Wishes
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