18 levels of numbering without tears

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Bruce Brown

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May 29, 2003, 9:58:44 AM5/29/03
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At least two posters within the past year have asked how to create 18
levels of numbering. Working with the STYLEREF field the other day, an
answer occurred to me that's laughably easy.

Set up the built-in Heading styles in the legal number format 1.1.,
1.1.1., etc. and use them for levels 1 through 9. Beyond level 9, use
the STYLEREF and LISTNUM fields side by side -- the first to capture
the 9 numeric values at the point of insertion, and the second to
number levels 10 to 18.

( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 1 \S 1 )
( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 2 )
( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 3 )
( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 4 )
( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 5 )
( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 6 )
( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 7 )
( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 8 )
( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 9 )

. . . gives you . . .

3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.
3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.1.
3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.1.1.
3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.1.1.1.
3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.1.1.1.1.
3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.1.1.1.1.1.
3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.
3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.
3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.

. . . etc.

You have to be careful about adding the start switch \S 1 to the first
level 10 field that follows a Heading 9 number, which re-starts all
levels 10 and above. But that's only the one immediately after a
Heading 9; otherwise you don't want any \S switch at all, just the
level switch \L.

Other than that, it's a pretty straightforward method: Heading styles
up to level 9, compound fields after that.

If someone absolutely insists that there be no period after the last
number, you're out of luck. The period is part of the LISTNUM
LegalDefault style and cannot be removed.

Should your format call for a hodge-podge of numbering styles other
than straight legal numbering, you could handle that too -- by setting
up a named list template with outline-numbered styles defined by you,
then using that name within the LISTNUM field in place of
LegalDefault. In that case, you'd never actually use the styles you
create; you'd use the LISTNUM field as a substitute for them.

How about SEQ fields? Wouldn't they be better for this purpose? I
don't think so. SEQ fields do single level lists only, not outlines,
so you'd need nine differently named SEQ fields to do the same
numbering as one LISTNUM field at level 9, and each of the nine SEQ
fields would have to be re-started manually throughout the document.

Setting up the 18 levels is the easy part. After that, how could
anyone possibly read them?

P.S. Apologies if someone else has already posted this solution; I
missed it.

========================================================================

Cass

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Jun 1, 2003, 11:24:32 PM6/1/03
to
Bruce, You are a wonderful, wonderful person!

I was one of the people that wanted to do 18 levels of
numbering. It was so long ago that I now no longer need
it (we got around it by breaking up the document into
several separately numbered volumes), but I am relieved
that there was actually a solution to the problem!

thanks,
cass.


>-----Original Message-----
>At least two posters within the past year have asked how
to create 18
>levels of numbering. Working with the STYLEREF field the
other day, an
>answer occurred to me that's laughably easy.
>
>Set up the built-in Heading styles in the legal number
format 1.1.,
>1.1.1., etc. and use them for levels 1 through 9. Beyond
level 9, use
>the STYLEREF and LISTNUM fields side by side -- the first
to capture
>the 9 numeric values at the point of insertion, and the
second to
>number levels 10 to 18.
>
>( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 1 \S 1 )
>( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 2 )
>( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 3 )
>( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 4 )
>( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 5 )
>( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 6 )
>( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 7 )
>( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 8 )
>( STYLEREF 9 \S }.{ LISTNUM LegalDefault \L 9 )
>

>.. . . gives you . . .


>
>3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.
>3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.1.
>3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.1.1.
>3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.1.1.1.
>3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.1.1.1.1.
>3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.1.1.1.1.1.
>3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.
>3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.
>3.5.7.2.8.9.4.6.3.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.1.
>

>.. . . etc.

>.
>

Bruce Brown

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Jun 2, 2003, 11:04:01 PM6/2/03
to
Cass -

Thanks so much for your extraordinarily generous words. I'm only
sorry the solution came too late to save you from all that extra work.
Thanks again, Cass.

- Bruce

======================================================================

"Cass" <cmcl...@baesystems.com> wrote in message news:<039501c328b6$7c222fc0$a501...@phx.gbl>...

srut...@sunwestaviation.ca

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Mar 17, 2013, 3:00:31 PM3/17/13
to
I too am trying to make a list which is more than 9 levels. I am new to word 2007 and understand how to create a multilevel list and using list styles. However our company publications require a list that has 5 heading levels using:
1
1.1
1.1.1
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1.1
but then we also need to be able to use the following list under anyone of these heading levels and have it restart after each heading:
1)
a)
i)
1.
a.
i.
(1)
(a)
(i)
Does anyone have any suggestions?
Sally

kontik...@gmail.com

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Oct 7, 2018, 11:15:44 AM10/7/18
to
Is there also a way to have the following system for the headlines above 9?

a)
aa)
aaa)
aaaa)
aaaaa)
etc.?

Thank you!

rpittm...@gmail.com

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Jun 7, 2019, 12:07:47 PM6/7/19
to
I hate to be a dumb dumb but how do I get to the STYLE REF field and actually do the steps that you laid out below? I also need to make a larger table of contents and believe what you have is the answer, I just don't know how to do it.
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