Lowering audio volume with Windows XP Pro. SP3's Sound Recorder result distorted audio quality?

5 views
Skip to first unread message

Ant

unread,
Dec 26, 2010, 4:52:55 PM12/26/10
to
Hello.

Is it me or does lowering my WAV's audio volume result in an updated
Windows XP Pro. SP3's Sound Recorder? Is this a bug in this program or
something else?

Also, does anyone know of a good free audio program that will do batches
to lower audio volume in a bunch of old WAV files? Doing one by one is a
pain in the butt/abdomen. :(

Thank you in advance. :)
--
"The foreign policy aim of ants can be summed up as follows: restless
aggression, territorial conquest, and genocidal annihilation of
neighboring colonies whenever possible. If ants had nuclear weapons,
they would probably end the world in a week." --Journey to the Ants,
page 59. Bert Holldobler & Edward O. Wilson
/\___/\ Phil./Ant @ http://antfarm.ma.cx (Personal Web Site)
/ /\ /\ \ Ant's Quality Foraged Links: http://aqfl.net
| |o o| |
\ _ / If crediting, then use Ant nickname and AQFL URL/link.
( ) If e-mailing, then axe ANT from its address if needed.
Ant is currently not listening to any songs on this computer.

Paul

unread,
Dec 26, 2010, 5:12:48 PM12/26/10
to
Ant wrote:
> Hello.
>
> Is it me or does lowering my WAV's audio volume result in an updated
> Windows XP Pro. SP3's Sound Recorder? Is this a bug in this program or
> something else?
>
> Also, does anyone know of a good free audio program that will do batches
> to lower audio volume in a bunch of old WAV files? Doing one by one is a
> pain in the butt/abdomen. :(
>
> Thank you in advance. :)

What I do for testing recording, is a "what you hear" kind of test.

It's possible for a lot of sound cards, to record what is
currently being played back. The patch panel inside the
chip, has the resources to allow you to do this.

Program #1 (playback) -----------+------> speakers
|
summing
Program #2 (record) <---------junction

You can fire up Audacity, and use it to generate a signal.
Then, leave Audacity in playback mode, sending out, say, a
sine wave.

http://audacity.sourceforge.net/

Now, go to Sound Recorder, and record the signal. Sound
Recorder would be "Program #2" in the diagram.

I think I tried to do both inside Audacity at the same
time, but it won't run full duplex. That's why I needed
two programs, to evaluate the sound hardware.

Later, load the recorded signal from sound recorder, into
Audacity, and compare the two waveforms.

Doing so, can show you various kinds of distortions, crackling,
pops, or the like. And then you can judge the distortion type,
and figure out a remedy. Or, even post a picture of the
recorded waveform, on imageshack.us, for comments.

Another kind of test signal that is handy, is an "impulse".
Using a suitable sound program, you "draw" a waveform, being
careful to not exceed the Nyquist limited bandwidth of the
system. (In other words, you can draw a square wave with
vertical edges, but due to the known bandwidth limitations
of your sound system, the pulse should really be drawn as
some kind of trapezoid. You wouldn't go out of your way,
to draw a signal, which is outside the bandwidth of the
system. Here, my rise and fall times are limited.)

----
/ \
------/ \--------

The purpose of impulse testing, is to spot the addition
of "echo" by the sound driver. My SoundMax AC97 audio chips,
had a 30 millisecond echo/delay added for "concert hall realism".
And, it couldn't be turned off. Even with the sound effects
control panel set to "None", the echo was *still* there. The
usage of the pulse, makes it easier to look 30 milliseconds
downstream, on the recorded waveform, for a tiny copy of the
pulse. It's a subtle form of "digital mutilation", which
causes a busy sound sample to "sound muddy". So if you
"hear mud", then check for an artificial echo that has
been added. The cure in my case, was to switch to a
PCI sound card, and turn the SoundMax off.

HTH,
Paul

choro

unread,
Dec 26, 2010, 5:22:58 PM12/26/10
to
On 26/12/2010 21:52, Ant wrote:
> Hello.
>
> Is it me or does lowering my WAV's audio volume result in an updated
> Windows XP Pro. SP3's Sound Recorder? Is this a bug in this program or
> something else?
>
> Also, does anyone know of a good free audio program that will do batches
> to lower audio volume in a bunch of old WAV files? Doing one by one is a
> pain in the butt/abdomen. :(

Pain in the what?

What's the matter? Haven't you got an ass or a neck?
--
choro
*****

dadiOH

unread,
Dec 26, 2010, 5:04:28 PM12/26/10
to
Ant wrote:
> Hello.
>
> Is it me or does lowering my WAV's audio volume result in an updated
> Windows XP Pro. SP3's Sound Recorder? Is this a bug in this program or
> something else?
>
> Also, does anyone know of a good free audio program that will do
> batches to lower audio volume in a bunch of old WAV files? Doing one
> by one is a pain in the butt/abdomen. :(

CDex is nice if you understan normalization and how to set the parameters to
get what you want.
http://cdexos.sourceforge.net/

Audiograbber is fine too and might be a bit esier to use.
http://www.audiograbber.org/


--

dadiOH
____________________________

dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
...a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico

Ant

unread,
Dec 26, 2010, 6:15:34 PM12/26/10
to
On 12/26/2010 2:04 PM PT, dadiOH typed:

>> Is it me or does lowering my WAV's audio volume result in an updated
>> Windows XP Pro. SP3's Sound Recorder? Is this a bug in this program or
>> something else?
>>
>> Also, does anyone know of a good free audio program that will do
>> batches to lower audio volume in a bunch of old WAV files? Doing one
>> by one is a pain in the butt/abdomen. :(
>
> CDex is nice if you understan normalization and how to set the parameters to
> get what you want.
> http://cdexos.sourceforge.net/

Is normalization same as lowering volume? I thought normalization
basically limits the peaks?
--
"Trivial hurts, tiny human accidents," said Firenze, as his hooves
thudded over the mossy floor. "These are of no more significance than
the scurryings of ants to the wide universe, and are unaffected by
planetary movements." --Harry Potter book

Ant

unread,
Dec 26, 2010, 6:15:55 PM12/26/10
to
On 12/26/2010 2:22 PM PT, choro typed:

>> Is it me or does lowering my WAV's audio volume result in an updated
>> Windows XP Pro. SP3's Sound Recorder? Is this a bug in this program or
>> something else?
>>
>> Also, does anyone know of a good free audio program that will do batches
>> to lower audio volume in a bunch of old WAV files? Doing one by one is a
>> pain in the butt/abdomen. :(
>
> Pain in the what?
>
> What's the matter? Haven't you got an ass or a neck?

Ants don't have a donkey, butt, etc. :)
--
"An ant is a wise creature for itself, but it is a shrewd thing in an
orchard or garden." --Francis Bacon

Paul

unread,
Dec 26, 2010, 7:50:12 PM12/26/10
to
Ant wrote:
> On 12/26/2010 2:04 PM PT, dadiOH typed:
>
>>> Is it me or does lowering my WAV's audio volume result in an updated
>>> Windows XP Pro. SP3's Sound Recorder? Is this a bug in this program or
>>> something else?
>>>
>>> Also, does anyone know of a good free audio program that will do
>>> batches to lower audio volume in a bunch of old WAV files? Doing one
>>> by one is a pain in the butt/abdomen. :(
>>
>> CDex is nice if you understan normalization and how to set the
>> parameters to
>> get what you want.
>> http://cdexos.sourceforge.net/
>
> Is normalization same as lowering volume? I thought normalization
> basically limits the peaks?

In Audacity, when you normalize, you can set a target level. Such
as "normalize to -10dB". Then, no peak should go above -10dB.

Paul

MyNews

unread,
Dec 26, 2010, 8:00:40 PM12/26/10
to
Right and True!

"Paul" <nos...@needed.com> wrote in message
news:if8ns3$19d$1...@news.eternal-september.org...

--
http://mynews.ath.cx

Paul in Houston TX

unread,
Dec 26, 2010, 8:03:26 PM12/26/10
to
Ant wrote:
> Hello.
>
> Is it me or does lowering my WAV's audio volume result in an updated
> Windows XP Pro. SP3's Sound Recorder? Is this a bug in this program or
> something else?
>
> Also, does anyone know of a good free audio program that will do batches
> to lower audio volume in a bunch of old WAV files? Doing one by one is a
> pain in the butt/abdomen. :(
>
> Thank you in advance. :)

I don;t know anything about SP3 soundrecorder.
I use Goldwave for recording and Audiograbber
for batch normalizing.

Hot-Text

unread,
Dec 26, 2010, 8:43:23 PM12/26/10
to
"MyNews" <myn...@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:if8ofp$evr$1...@speranza.aioe.org...
> Right and True!

Who are you ? Some teacher grading responses ?

Ant

unread,
Dec 26, 2010, 8:52:04 PM12/26/10
to
On 12/26/2010 5:03 PM PT, Paul in Houston TX typed:

Is normalizing same as lowering audio volume? I am not familiar with
that one.
--
"Size isn't everything. The whale is endangered, while the ant continues
to do just fine." --Bill Vaughan

Paul in Houston TX

unread,
Dec 26, 2010, 10:35:50 PM12/26/10
to
Ant wrote:
> On 12/26/2010 5:03 PM PT, Paul in Houston TX typed:
>
>>> Is it me or does lowering my WAV's audio volume result in an updated
>>> Windows XP Pro. SP3's Sound Recorder? Is this a bug in this program or
>>> something else?
>>>
>>> Also, does anyone know of a good free audio program that will do
>>> batches to lower audio volume in a bunch of old WAV files? Doing one
>>> by one is a pain in the butt/abdomen. :(
>>>
>>> Thank you in advance. :)
>>
>> I don;t know anything about SP3 soundrecorder.
>> I use Goldwave for recording and Audiograbber
>> for batch normalizing.
>
> Is normalizing same as lowering audio volume? I am not familiar with
> that one.

I just realized that Audiograbber won't do what you
want since it only grabs sound files from CD's.
I don't know if it would see *.wav or not.

However, if you can find a program that normalizes:
Normalizing is making all the tracks the same volume.
You can normalize to a percentage.
Say you wanted all the sound files to be of the same volume
but based on 25% of the highest volume original file,
you would normalize so that all files would come out the
same volume but only at 1/4 the volume of the highest one.

MyNews

unread,
Dec 26, 2010, 11:08:40 PM12/26/10
to
My Am Hot-Text
For "Hot-Text" <hot-tex...@comcast.net> <text...@hotmail.com> is Me
and you just need to post too me little Girl
You my Baby here Kiss for you!
LOOL!
we know you or the one send the post Guess Who!
I can teacher you just E-mail me Girl!
--
http://mynews.ath.cx

Ant

unread,
Dec 27, 2010, 1:35:26 AM12/27/10
to
On 12/26/2010 7:35 PM PT, Paul in Houston TX typed:

>>> I don;t know anything about SP3 soundrecorder.
>>> I use Goldwave for recording and Audiograbber
>>> for batch normalizing.
>>
>> Is normalizing same as lowering audio volume? I am not familiar with
>> that one.
>
> I just realized that Audiograbber won't do what you
> want since it only grabs sound files from CD's.
> I don't know if it would see *.wav or not.
>
> However, if you can find a program that normalizes:
> Normalizing is making all the tracks the same volume.
> You can normalize to a percentage.
> Say you wanted all the sound files to be of the same volume
> but based on 25% of the highest volume original file,
> you would normalize so that all files would come out the
> same volume but only at 1/4 the volume of the highest one.

Thanks. I will try that.
--
"Better (to be) an ant's head than a lion's tail." --Armenian and Maltese

dadiOH

unread,
Dec 27, 2010, 6:42:42 AM12/27/10
to
Paul in Houston TX wrote:
> Ant wrote:
>> On 12/26/2010 5:03 PM PT, Paul in Houston TX typed:
>>
>>>> Is it me or does lowering my WAV's audio volume result in an
>>>> updated Windows XP Pro. SP3's Sound Recorder? Is this a bug in
>>>> this program or something else?
>>>>
>>>> Also, does anyone know of a good free audio program that will do
>>>> batches to lower audio volume in a bunch of old WAV files? Doing
>>>> one by one is a pain in the butt/abdomen. :(
>>>>
>>>> Thank you in advance. :)
>>>
>>> I don;t know anything about SP3 soundrecorder.
>>> I use Goldwave for recording and Audiograbber
>>> for batch normalizing.
>>
>> Is normalizing same as lowering audio volume? I am not familiar with
>> that one.
>
> I just realized that Audiograbber won't do what you
> want since it only grabs sound files from CD's.
> I don't know if it would see *.wav or not.

It will.

Paul in Houston TX

unread,
Dec 27, 2010, 7:41:12 PM12/27/10
to
dadiOH wrote:
> Paul in Houston TX wrote:
>> Ant wrote:
>>> On 12/26/2010 5:03 PM PT, Paul in Houston TX typed:
>>>
>>>>> Is it me or does lowering my WAV's audio volume result in an
>>>>> updated Windows XP Pro. SP3's Sound Recorder? Is this a bug in
>>>>> this program or something else?
>>>>>
>>>>> Also, does anyone know of a good free audio program that will do
>>>>> batches to lower audio volume in a bunch of old WAV files? Doing
>>>>> one by one is a pain in the butt/abdomen. :(
>>>>>
>>>>> Thank you in advance. :)
>>>> I don;t know anything about SP3 soundrecorder.
>>>> I use Goldwave for recording and Audiograbber
>>>> for batch normalizing.
>>> Is normalizing same as lowering audio volume? I am not familiar with
>>> that one.
>> I just realized that Audiograbber won't do what you
>> want since it only grabs sound files from CD's.
>> I don't know if it would see *.wav or not.
>
> It will.

A long time ago I used FakeCD to create fake cd drives.
There is probably a small program that will run on XP
that would do the same.

pjp

unread,
Dec 27, 2010, 10:57:03 PM12/27/10
to

"Paul in Houston TX" <Pa...@Houston.com> wrote in message
news:ifbbp7$kgn$1...@news.eternal-september.org...

I suspect you could run them thru AudioGrabber after first changing the
Normalization value which I believe is 98% by default, e.g. change it to 60%
would result in an output file with a reduced volume level. AudioGrabber
allows drag-n-drop for multipule files so that's not an issue. What I'm
unsure of is will it process mp3 files or would you first have to convert
them back to wav as I've never needed to "go back" or if I thought I might
need/want to I kept the original wav also.


Paul in Houston TX

unread,
Dec 28, 2010, 1:52:59 AM12/28/10
to

I think Audiograbber and Goldwave both expand to *.wav in RAM
for processing and then compress to mp3 for saving,
if stored as mp3.

Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages