Attn: Ron Martell, what should I do about low system, user and GDI resources?

26 views
Skip to first unread message

Andie

unread,
Dec 27, 2000, 3:21:04 AM12/27/00
to
I have a 320MB physical ram and about 5 GB of free space on my hard
drive. I do admit to having about 16 windows open at any one time and
resource meter shows up as yellow instead of green.

TIA

Richard G. Harper

unread,
Dec 27, 2000, 8:03:25 AM12/27/00
to
No need to panic. As you open more programs, resources will be used.
That's what they're there for.

--
Richard G. Harper (MVP MPS-D) rgha...@email.com
* NOTE - Private EMail is generally not replied to. Please post all
* questions and comments in the newsgroup so all can benefit.
* Help US help YOU - http://members.home.com/dts-l/goodpost.htm

"Andie" <nic...@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
news:3A49A670...@bigfoot.com...

Andie

unread,
Dec 27, 2000, 8:39:19 AM12/27/00
to
"Richard G. Harper" wrote:

> No need to panic. As you open more programs, resources will be used.
> That's what they're there for.

How low is considered as still acceptable.
I don't want to reach a situation when everything slows to a crawl.

Jack E Martinelli

unread,
Dec 27, 2000, 10:34:10 AM12/27/00
to

Andie wrote:

Under usual circumstances, you will receive messages to close some apps at ca.
10% system resources.
--
Jack E Martinelli
Boston MA USA


Walter Clayton

unread,
Dec 27, 2000, 11:45:40 AM12/27/00
to
Low is when you reach 0. I've run for extended periods of time under 10%.
WinMe has some design changes that hit the resource heaps harder and recover
better than it's predecessors.

--
Walter Clayton
Microsoft MVP (MPS-D)
Any technology distinguishable from magic is insufficiently advanced
http://members.home.com/dts-l
Want to know where each version of a MS module came from?
Try http://support.microsoft.com/servicedesks/fileversion/default.asp


"Andie" <nic...@bigfoot.com> wrote in message

news:3A49F106...@bigfoot.com...

Richard G. Harper

unread,
Dec 27, 2000, 11:58:18 AM12/27/00
to
Resources (or the lack of them) will never cause your system to slow down.
Too many programs using too much memory and CPU time are what cause
slowdowns in the system.

--
Richard G. Harper (MVP MPS-D) rgha...@email.com
* NOTE - Private EMail is generally not replied to. Please post all
* questions and comments in the newsgroup so all can benefit.
* Help US help YOU - http://members.home.com/dts-l/goodpost.htm

"Andie" <nic...@bigfoot.com> wrote in message

news:3A49F106...@bigfoot.com...

Andie

unread,
Dec 27, 2000, 12:08:32 PM12/27/00
to
"Richard G. Harper" wrote:

> Resources (or the lack of them) will never cause your system to slow down.
> Too many programs using too much memory and CPU time are what cause
> slowdowns in the system.

So is there any other solution to slowdowns besides closing programs, like
getting more RAM or upgrading the CPU?

Jack E Martinelli

unread,
Dec 27, 2000, 12:34:38 PM12/27/00
to
Andie wrote:

You've hit the nail on the head!

Richard G. Harper

unread,
Dec 27, 2000, 3:11:54 PM12/27/00
to

Well, adding memory or a faster CPU will definitely help, though the more
reasonable response is to limit the amount of "junk" (and I do put that in
quotes because one person's junk is another person's treasure <G>) that runs
in the background. That's a far more reasonable - and certainly less
expensive - solution. :-)

--
Richard G. Harper (MVP MPS-D) rgha...@email.com
* NOTE - Private EMail is generally not replied to. Please post all
* questions and comments in the newsgroup so all can benefit.
* Help US help YOU - http://members.home.com/dts-l/goodpost.htm

"Andie" <nic...@bigfoot.com> wrote in message

news:3A4A2210...@bigfoot.com...

Ron Martell

unread,
Dec 28, 2000, 3:10:44 PM12/28/00
to
Andie <nic...@bigfoot.com> wrote:

System Resource usage is pretty well directly related to the number
and type of tasks you have running.

Specifically, each of those 16 windows is using resources so unless
you have 16 monitors (and preferably 16 eyes so you can look at them
all simultaneously) you probably can get by with a lot fewer Windows
open. That should reduce your resource useage.

Also, in addition to the 16 open windows, how many "tools and toys" do
you have running in the background? Each of these soaks up resources
and many of them are totally dispensable for most users.

Use Start - Run - MSCONFIG - Startup to temporarily turn off selected
items in the Startup and see how that affects your overall computer
performance. If you don't seem to be missing anything then you want
to turn that item back on again in MSCONFIG and then permanently get
rid of by either changing the setup configuration for the application
that item belongs to or by deleting the entry that launches it from
the registry.

Note that there are a number of items in the WindowsMe startup list
that should not be turned off, as they are part of the safety and
error recovery systems built into WindowsMe or are generally needed
for efficient normal operation of the computer. These items include:
ScanRegistry
TaskMonitor
SystemTray
2 LoadPowerProfile entries
PCHealth
StateMgr
startup entries for antivirus
HID related entries if you have a USB keyboard or USB mouse

Hope this is of some assistance.

Good luck.

Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
--
Microsoft MVP
On-Line Help Computer Service
http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

"The reason computer chips are so small is computers don't eat much."

Ron Martell

unread,
Dec 28, 2000, 3:28:19 PM12/28/00
to
Andie <nic...@bigfoot.com> wrote:

Yes, there are.

However, an effective solution first requires determining what is the
actual cause of the slowdown.

If the cause is due to memory usage then this will be indicated by the
amount of swap file activity. A pretty good method of assessing this
is with the System Monitor utility that comes with Windows. Set it to
track "Memory Manager:Swap File In Use" and leave it running all day,
checking every once in a while and making note of the highest value
recorded. Repeat this for several days of normal to heavy usage of
the computer. If the swap file in use is consistently at 20 mb or
more then adding more RAM will almost certainly result in improved
performance. The amount added should be at least equal to the largest
value seen for "swap file in use" and preferably a bit more.

If the swap file useage is not significant then the best option would
probably be a faster CPU and this may not be too expensive provided
your motherboard can handle a CPU that is enough faster to make a
noticeable difference. This would mean at least a 50% increase in CPU
speed for most users.

If such a CPU cannot be accommodated or is not available then the
upgrade would also have to include a new motherboard. Again, not
impossible - just more money.

And an additional possible complication is that the existing RAM may
not be useable with the new board, or may be useable but only if the
board is operated at a reduced speed (P100 RAM in a PC133 board for
example). And replacing the RAM means still more dollars. At some
point the costs of piecemeal replacements are such that it is
worthwhile considering a whole new computer instead.

Hope this is of some assistance.

Good luck


cqu...@iafrica.com

unread,
Dec 29, 2000, 6:45:15 AM12/29/00
to
On Thu, 28 Dec 2000 20:10:44 GMT, Ron Martell <r...@onlinehelp.bc.ca>
>Andie <nic...@bigfoot.com> wrote:

>>I have a 320MB physical ram and about 5 GB of free space on my hard
>>drive. I do admit to having about 16 windows open at any one time and
>>resource meter shows up as yellow instead of green.

I sometimes have scroll bars on my taskbar, so IKWYM...

>Specifically, each of those 16 windows is using resources so unless
>you have 16 monitors (and preferably 16 eyes so you can look at them
>all simultaneously) you probably can get by with a lot fewer Windows
>open. That should reduce your resource useage.

Difficult when some apps are not MDI (Office 2000, web browsers).

I often open web pages in new windows with the intention of reading
them later offline, or saving to disk for later. The other type of
user who hits this wall are users of "virtual desktops", where
multiple screen images hold different windows - in such cases, it's
easy to forget what is open in views you aren't looking at.

>Also, in addition to the 16 open windows, how many "tools and toys" do
>you have running in the background? Each of these soaks up resources
>and many of them are totally dispensable for most users.

Amen!

>Use Start - Run - MSCONFIG - Startup to temporarily turn off selected
>items in the Startup and see how that affects you

>Note that there are a number of items in the WindowsMe startup list


>that should not be turned off, as they are part of the safety and
>error recovery systems built into WindowsMe or are generally needed

Ron: In that context, what is SSDPSRV ? Turns up in a registry
Runxxx key in WinME systems, and I don't know what it is.

Last tip: One possible resource bleeder may be SVGA drivers.

I suspect that makes my current Win95 SR2 system bleed more than my
old Win95 original did; the old PC has an S3 card, the new one has
Tseng ET6000 card, and this one ooses away in a few days.

>------------ ----- --- -- - - - -
Drugs are usually safe. Inject? (Y/n)
>------------ ----- --- -- - - - -

Ron Martell

unread,
Dec 29, 2000, 8:25:12 PM12/29/00
to
cqu...@iafrica.com wrote:


>Ron: In that context, what is SSDPSRV ? Turns up in a registry
>Runxxx key in WinME systems, and I don't know what it is.
>

From the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

Description of Universal Plug and Play Features in Windows Me
[Q262458]
http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q262/4/58.asp


"- Ssdpsrv.exe - This component provides SSDP and GENA services."

And now you know as much about it as I do.

Jack E Martinelli

unread,
Dec 31, 2000, 12:01:31 AM12/31/00
to

Ron Martell wrote:

> cqu...@iafrica.com wrote:
>
> >Ron: In that context, what is SSDPSRV ? Turns up in a registry
> >Runxxx key in WinME systems, and I don't know what it is.
> >
>
> From the Microsoft Knowledge Base:
>
> Description of Universal Plug and Play Features in Windows Me
> [Q262458]
> http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/q262/4/58.asp
>
> "- Ssdpsrv.exe - This component provides SSDP and GENA services."
>
> And now you know as much about it as I do.
>
> Good luck.
>
> Ron Martell Duncan B.C. Canada
> --
> Microsoft MVP
> On-Line Help Computer Service
> http://onlinehelp.bc.ca

cquirke and Ron,

My memory is that another poster suggested this "service of the future" opens
port 5000 for internet access by proposed Universal PNP devices. Whether the
port is opened on demand or continuously was not mentioned.


--
Jack E Martinelli
Boston MA USA

Happy New Millennium to all.


Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages