How long will ASP be supported?

0 views
Skip to first unread message

Aaron Bertrand [SQL Server MVP]

unread,
Jun 1, 2006, 12:23:55 PM6/1/06
to
Based on a couple of recent discussions I've had on this topic, I posted a
brief article last night:

"How long will classic ASP be supported?"
http://www.aspfaq.com/2545

Please let me know any feedback you have...


CJM

unread,
Jun 1, 2006, 12:40:56 PM6/1/06
to

"Aaron Bertrand [SQL Server MVP]" <ten...@dnartreb.noraa> wrote in message
news:u1cASfZh...@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...

A fair summary...

However, I'm beginning to get twitchy - I think I'll be moving across to
ASP.NET for a number a number of reasons, including the fact that if I want
peer support, there is less and less of it available in NGs like this one.
When I started coming here, there were several hundred posts a day... Now we
get a fraction of that.

So I'll end up moving on, simply because everyone else has done.

But I agree that there doesnt seem to be any rush to change, and I suspect
ASP Classic will be around for a while longer.

CJM


Kyle Peterson

unread,
Jun 1, 2006, 12:51:12 PM6/1/06
to

Mike Brind

unread,
Jun 1, 2006, 4:57:15 PM6/1/06
to

CJM wrote:
> "Aaron Bertrand [SQL Server MVP]" <ten...@dnartreb.noraa> wrote in message
> news:u1cASfZh...@TK2MSFTNGP03.phx.gbl...
> > Based on a couple of recent discussions I've had on this topic, I posted a
> > brief article last night:
> >
> > "How long will classic ASP be supported?"
> > http://www.aspfaq.com/2545
> >
> > Please let me know any feedback you have...
> >
>
> A fair summary...

Agreed. And I especially agree with the main thrust that Microsoft's
primary business is in providing platform software on which
applications run. With nearly 4 billion asp pages indexed by google
(and probably at least half as many again on unindexed corporate
intranets, cms systems, admin sites etc), no one in their right mind
will pull the plug on that load of business (more than double java
server pages and cold fusion added together!).

>
> However, I'm beginning to get twitchy - I think I'll be moving across to
> ASP.NET for a number a number of reasons, including the fact that if I want
> peer support, there is less and less of it available in NGs like this one.
> When I started coming here, there were several hundred posts a day... Now we
> get a fraction of that.
>

Is that because fewer people are starting out with Microsoft
technologies in favour of open source? Is it because there is such a
huge support network for clasic ASP out there now? Try typing a
standard error message into google and look at the number of excellent
resources that come back (usually headed by aspfaq.com)

> So I'll end up moving on, simply because everyone else has done.

Have they all moved on to Dotnet though? The sexy end of web
application development seems to be rooted in open source/scripting
languages - php, python, ruby, perl - in the "Web 2.0" world
(http://www.oreillynet.com/pub/a/oreilly/tim/news/2005/09/30/what-is-web-20.html?page=4).

I can fully understand established development houses with a history of
VB6/classic ASP/SQL Server moving on to ASP.NET, but will those who
started out with learning php be making the same move?

Does anyone know which technology is being taught to university and
college students these days?

--
Mike Brind

CJM

unread,
Jun 2, 2006, 6:27:32 AM6/2/06
to

"Mike Brind" <paxt...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1149195435.0...@g10g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...

>
>>
>> However, I'm beginning to get twitchy - I think I'll be moving across to
>> ASP.NET for a number a number of reasons, including the fact that if I
>> want
>> peer support, there is less and less of it available in NGs like this
>> one.
>> When I started coming here, there were several hundred posts a day... Now
>> we
>> get a fraction of that.
>>
>
> Is that because fewer people are starting out with Microsoft
> technologies in favour of open source?

That is certainly a factor I would suggest.

> Is it because there is such a
> huge support network for clasic ASP out there now? Try typing a
> standard error message into google and look at the number of excellent
> resources that come back (usually headed by aspfaq.com)
>

Ideally we should have done all this before we approach the NG... We come
here when google fails us!

>> So I'll end up moving on, simply because everyone else has done.
>
> Have they all moved on to Dotnet though?

Probably not all...

> The sexy end of web
> application development seems to be rooted in open source/scripting
> languages - php, python, ruby, perl - in the "Web 2.0" world
> (http://www.oreillynet.com/pub/a/oreilly/tim/news/2005/09/30/what-is-web-20.html?page=4).
>

Web 2.0 is a con. It's Web 1.0 done in a particular way. Yes, php, python,
ruby-on-rails, etc all have a part to play, as does ASP.NET and others.

> I can fully understand established development houses with a history of
> VB6/classic ASP/SQL Server moving on to ASP.NET, but will those who
> started out with learning php be making the same move?
>

I'm a Windows + Web developer, in a predominantly Windows-based
organisation, so .NET is a logical progression.

> Does anyone know which technology is being taught to university and
> college students these days?

All of them. It depends what kind of course you are on, and what options
they choose.

Jason

unread,
Jun 7, 2006, 2:50:16 PM6/7/06
to
"Mike Brind" <paxt...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:1149195435.0...@g10g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>
> Does anyone know which technology is being taught to university and
> college students these days?
>
> --
> Mike Brind
>

At Utah State, we have classes for VB.NET and PHP, and they are BIS classes.

--Jason


Jason

unread,
Jun 7, 2006, 2:59:00 PM6/7/06
to
"Jason" <bigwheels16 hotmail> wrote in message
news:R-ydnRHjA5KwvRrZ...@comcast.com...
I don't think any of them are required though. Just elective classes.

--Jason


Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages