Maximum number of characters in merged cells

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Bill

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Dec 30, 2003, 4:11:21 PM12/30/03
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Is there a maximum number of characters a merged cells will hold? I have a text field of merged cells however, after about 11 rows all of the text does not show even though it looks like there is room for the additional text.

Bernard Liengme

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Dec 30, 2003, 4:17:16 PM12/30/03
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Bill,
Do a search in help with "Specifications" and you will find:

Length of cell contents (text): 32,767 characters. Only 1,024 display
in a cell; all 32,767 display in the formula bar

Bernard

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Norman Harker

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Dec 30, 2003, 4:19:46 PM12/30/03
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Hi Bill!

I suspect that the limit is the same as for a single cell:

Extract from Specifications:

32,767 characters. Only 1,024 display in a cell; all 32,767 display in

the formula bar.

--
Regards
Norman Harker MVP (Excel)
Sydney, Australia
njha...@optusnet.com.au
Excel and Word Function Lists (Classifications, Syntax and Arguments)
available free to good homes.


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Dave Peterson

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Dec 30, 2003, 4:54:31 PM12/30/03
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You can have a cell that contains about 32k worth of characters, but left to its
own devices, excel will only show about 1000.

You can add alt-enters to force new lines within your cell and you can see more.

But with mergedcells, you'll have to adjust the rowheight yourself--it won't
react nicely to autofitting the rowheight.

Bill wrote:
>
> Is there a maximum number of characters a merged cells will hold? I have a text field of merged cells however, after about 11 rows all of the text does not show even though it looks like there is room for the additional text.

--

Dave Peterson
ec3...@msn.com

Harlan Grove

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Dec 30, 2003, 7:49:07 PM12/30/03
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"Norman Harker" wrote...

>I suspect that the limit is the same as for a single cell:
>
>Extract from Specifications:
>
>32,767 characters. Only 1,024 display in a cell; all 32,767 display in
>the formula bar.
..

And the specs are as accurate and complete as senior MSFT execs testimony in the
last antitrust trial.

If the cell evaluates to text with newline characters every 100-200 characters,
the typesize is small enough, and the column width and row height large enough,
Excel happily displays over 10,000 characters in a cell. Indeed, with column A's
width set to 150, rows 1:3s' height set to 409, cells A1:A3 merged, font set to
Arial with typesize 6, the formula

=REPT(REPT("#",254)&CHAR(10),128)&REPT("_",130)

happily displays all 32,767 characters that Excel is capable of displaying or
evaluating to. So much for specs. As for those who spout them uncritically, ...

Specs are only as good/accurate as the people who write them care about making
them. Based on evidence, Microsoft doesn't seem to give a damn about 'em.


Norman Harker

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Dec 30, 2003, 7:59:49 PM12/30/03
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Hi Harlan!

Since you hate Microsoft so much, I wonder why you keep using it <vbg>

--
Regards
Norman Harker MVP (Excel)
Sydney, Australia
njha...@optusnet.com.au
Excel and Word Function Lists (Classifications, Syntax and Arguments)
available free to good homes.

"Harlan Grove" <hrl...@aol.com> wrote in message
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Harlan Grove

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Dec 30, 2003, 8:16:10 PM12/30/03
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"Norman Harker" wrote...

>Since you hate Microsoft so much, I wonder why you keep using it <vbg>

No choice, at least not at work. Still, it's a challenge - so much either poorly
documented (this) or undocumented (array semantics of INDIRECT or OFFSET fed
array arguments). Suppose there's also some masochism. If only gnumeric were
ported to Windows!


Norman Harker

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Dec 30, 2003, 11:40:05 PM12/30/03
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Hi Harlan!

I suppose that we'll just have to try and work with Microsoft to try
and improve it. Stupid little things for a start like getting Help to
say that the limit on characters varies according to which characters
are used. Plus a tad more rigour with the statistics. We'll have to
lock the marketing guys up first.

--
Regards
Norman Harker MVP (Excel)
Sydney, Australia
njha...@optusnet.com.au
Excel and Word Function Lists (Classifications, Syntax and Arguments)
available free to good homes.
"Harlan Grove" <hrl...@aol.com> wrote in message

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