Using Trichocereus candicans as a stock for grafting Lophophora williamsii

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steve

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Jul 1, 2008, 1:32:55 AM7/1/08
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I recently saw that it was recommended as a stock for grafting
Lophophora williamsii in the following website:

http://www.articlecity.com/articles/hobbies/article_448.shtml


Has anyone had any experience using it in this capacity?

Thanks,
Steve


Lophophora Blog

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Jul 22, 2008, 3:52:11 PM7/22/08
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I have never used Trichocereus candicans as a grafting stock, but if it has similar properties, i.e. longevity and strong growth, to T. pachanoi and T. bridgesii - my favorite grafting stock plants - it would be an excellent stock choice. The article favors T. candicans  over T. pachanoi with the argument that it is smaller and easier to manage. This might be true but I've never seen size and vigorous growth as a problem with T. pachanoi (I even use this species as stock plant when grafting seedlings ;-). Also, T. candicans's tendency to tiller is emphasized -  neither T. pachanoi nor T. bridgesii offset as readily, but I rather like that as it makes the grafts easier to maintain (you don't have to prune the stock plant as often).

If you decide to experiment with Trichocereus candicans as grafting stock, I would very much like to learn about your experiences.

Lophophora Blog

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Jul 22, 2008, 3:58:00 PM7/22/08
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It seems like the italicized species names didn't make it through
(instead asterisks are inserted in the text), hence this second
attempt with a "clean" text:

I have never used Trichocereus candicans as a grafting stock, but if
it has similar properties, i.e. longevity and strong growth, to T.
pachanoi and T. bridgesii - my favorite grafting stock plants - it
would be an excellent stock choice. The article favors T. candicans
over T. pachanoi with the argument that it is smaller and easier to
manage. This might be true but I've never seen size and vigorous
growth as a problem with T. pachanoi (I even use this species as stock
plant when grafting seedlings ;-). Also, T. candicans's tendency to
tiller is emphasized - neither T. pachanoi nor T. bridgesii offset as
readily, but I rather like that as it makes the grafts easier to
maintain (you don't have to prune the stock plant as often).

If you decide to experiment with Trichocereus candicans as grafting
stock, I would very much like to learn about your experiences.


On Tue, Jul 1, 2008 at 7:32 AM, steve <steve...@gmail.com> wrote:
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