Real Life Hacks

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Smokey B

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Sep 12, 2007, 2:51:25 PM9/12/07
to Lifehacker book 2.0
I've been looking through the original Lifehacker book and noticed
that it's mostly made up of computer based solutions, with only a few
sections covering life away from the computer. I think there should
be more of a balance between these two thinks. Ways I can hack
elements in my life that don't necessarily have to involved a
computer.

Since this is a book, I can take with me anywhere and it would be nice
to be able to read through it, and attempt some of the ideas without
sitting at a desktop. Otherwise, I can just search lifehacker.com and
find out what I'm looking for.

Obviously, the computer sections are great to have in one handy
reference, I just think a balance between the two spaces, or even
incorporating spaces would be a good change.

The section "Tune Your Computer" feels like it belongs in a computer
maintenance guide, and not in a Life Hack book. They're great tips,
they just feel out of place. Considering the rest of the book is all
about productivity, a computer tune up only indirectly contributes to
it. Truly deleting data from my drive? Good to know, but it won't
help be more productive with my day.

Just my two cents.

peter.fi...@gmail.com

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Sep 13, 2007, 9:43:57 AM9/13/07
to Lifehacker book 2.0
I agree with this (as I've said earlier) but I think it's particularly
the blend of the on- and off-line, the high- and low-tech
opportunities that's been what draws me back to lifehacker.com... I'm
just going to point to my other post for the rest of my current
thoughts :}

Smokey B

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Sep 13, 2007, 10:00:40 AM9/13/07
to Lifehacker book 2.0
I just checked out your other posts, and I should have first before
writing mine ;)

I completely agree with your stance on low-tech hacks. In fact, I
apply more of those than I actually do with the high-tech hacks, but
we need a greater mix. The first book weighed in more on the high-
tech side so hopefully it can get balanced out.

On Sep 13, 9:43 am, "peter.fitzger...@gmail.com"

peter.fi...@gmail.com

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Sep 14, 2007, 2:12:24 PM9/14/07
to Lifehacker book 2.0
One of the things I did when I started looking at my habits was taking
notes on high- and low-tech hacks that I wanted to try and what habits
they applied to. Much as nobody (probably including me) wants to
really think about how much effort I spent aligning the options that I
liked, I was able to turn each suggestion/note into an action plan
with a set of tasks spanning however long I thought it would take to
get some value from it.

What I found was that it was actually easier to break the options into
the tech levels and then to applicable habits primarily because they
actually served different purposes for me in a surprisingly clear-cut
way. It makes me wonder if the way in which we all use hacks is
perhaps more important than the hacks themselves...

Ahhh philosophical analysis!

But I do think it might be a reasonable section to add to LH2...
Something like "Hacks are only as useful as the habits they solve for
you"

> > > Just my two cents.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Smokey B

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Sep 14, 2007, 2:33:28 PM9/14/07
to Lifehacker book 2.0
One thing I've noticed about reading Lifehacker is I needed a
"gateway" hack. At first I thought they had a lot of cool ideas, and
I bookmarked certain hacks I wanted to try but never actually tried
them.

I found my original purpose on Lifehacker was finding awesome and free
software. Of course I still do, but it wasn't until I got into the
financial part that I started attempting and incorporating those ideas
in my own life.

Since then, I've been utilizing more and more ideas and attempting the
hacks that will improve my lifestyle, and not just based on the
financial portion.

So, basically it took me until on particular section peeked my
interest and turned my interest that I started to expand out and see
what else can help me.

I'm sure everyone else might even have a stepping stone like this, so
that section can be quite useful!

On Sep 14, 2:12 pm, "peter.fitzger...@gmail.com"

Gina Trapani @ Lifehacker

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Oct 2, 2007, 7:48:52 PM10/2/07
to lifehac...@googlegroups.com
Absolutely agreed that the book should be less computer-focused, and
more human/life focused. But, it is a book about productivity, and
its target audience uses computers or handheld devices all day at
work, hence the heavy load of computer hacks.

But, taking this to heart, I just submitted Chapter 3 (formerly
Chapter 8, Kickstart Your Productivity) and called it "Trick Yourself
into Getting Done." It's got more general hacks for beating
procrastination and getting organized in a way that helps yourself
check things off your to-do list. Essentially more "mind hacks" than
computer techniques.


--
Gina Trapani
Editor
http://lifehacker.com

Order Lifehacker the book:
http://lifehackerbook.com

samhealer

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Oct 5, 2007, 5:22:27 AM10/5/07
to Lifehacker book 2.0
A section on "mind hacks", interesting. Might want to include
something about forcing yourself to turn of you computer? Maybe
something about restricting your internet access.

Actually, I recall something on LifeHacker a while ago about
restricting access, and forcing breaks, something like that?

Sam

Smokey B

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Oct 5, 2007, 6:36:58 AM10/5/07
to Lifehacker book 2.0
Plus, getting you brain into a daily habit will make these "mind
hacks" more natural and before you know it, it'll be just like
breathing.

On Oct 5, 5:22 am, samhealer <samhe...@googlemail.com> wrote:
> A section on "mind hacks", interesting. Might want to include
> something about forcing yourself to turn of you computer? Maybe
> something about restricting your internet access.
>
> Actually, I recall something on LifeHacker a while ago about
> restricting access, and forcing breaks, something like that?
>
> Sam
>
> Gina Trapani @ Lifehacker wrote:
>
> > Absolutely agreed that the book should be less computer-focused, and
> > more human/life focused. But, it is a book about productivity, and
> > its target audience uses computers or handheld devices all day at
> > work, hence the heavy load of computer hacks.
>
> > But, taking this to heart, I just submitted Chapter 3 (formerly
> > Chapter 8, Kickstart Your Productivity) and called it "Trick Yourself
> > into Getting Done." It's got more general hacks for beating
> > procrastination and getting organized in a way that helps yourself
> > check things off your to-do list. Essentially more "mind hacks" than
> > computer techniques.
>

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