Productivity in your work with multiple machines

9 views
Skip to first unread message

leif....@gmail.com

unread,
Nov 17, 2007, 12:59:41 PM11/17/07
to Lifehacker book 2.0
I don't know if this fits in with the plans of this book, but in my
line of work, with several machines at the same time, i've come to
appreciate a couple of programs (3 to be exact) that together not only
brings order to my non-virtual desktop, but also increases my
productivity by easy switching between screens and cooperating across
machines.

The programs are:

Synergy - This has been mentioned at Lifehacker.com before, and is a
virtual switcher that lets us use the same mouse and keyboard at
several machines, and adds easy switching between by just moving the
mouse pointer from one screen to another. More: http://synergy2.sourceforge.net/

CopyCat - This little gem makes a whole lotta difference when it comes
to cooperating between machines. Whit this one you can copy text og
images from one machine to another. Perfect when working with two
dokuments or editing images and so on. More:
http://www.r2.com.au/software.php?page=2&show=copycat

Texter - This ought to ring a bell somewhere as it origins from
Lifehackers own code section. This macro/text replacement program has
an excellent feature. It uses Synergy to extend Texters functionality
to other machines connected by Synergy. This meanes that you can use
all your macros and such with all your machines even though you only
have installed it at one of your machines. More:
http://lifehacker.com/software/texter/lifehacker-code-texter-windows-238306.php

- Leif

Gina Trapani @ Lifehacker

unread,
Nov 18, 2007, 4:53:36 AM11/18/07
to lifehac...@googlegroups.com
This is fantastic, thanks Leif. You must be reading my mind, because
the only all-new chapter in the book is on working from and with
multiple computers, and will cover some of this stuff, though Copycat
is new to me. I'll check it out, thanks.

--
Gina Trapani
Editor
http://lifehacker.com

Order Lifehacker the book:
http://lifehackerbook.com

Rob Hudson

unread,
Nov 19, 2007, 2:07:15 PM11/19/07
to lifehac...@googlegroups.com
Are you going to mention using version control like TortoiseSVN to
manage source, text, and macro files across multiple computers? I've
found the process indispensable. I don't remember if LH V1 mentioned
personal version control, but anything with text files is a good
application.

Gina Trapani @ Lifehacker

unread,
Nov 26, 2007, 2:09:22 AM11/26/07
to lifehac...@googlegroups.com
On Nov 19, 2007 11:07 AM, Rob Hudson <cave...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Are you going to mention using version control like TortoiseSVN to
> manage source, text, and macro files across multiple computers?

Sadly I don't have version control on the roster for the new chapter,
because it's a pretty advanced hack. I love my text files, like you
do, but we're a minority. The main complaint I got about the first
edition (especially regarding the todo.txt hack) was that it's for
"super techies," not as accessible to "regular people," whatever that
means. :)

Of course, many Lifehacker.com readers *are* super-techies, so we did
cover it on the site (Adam wrote up TortoiseSVN.) But it won't be in
the book.

Right now in the new multiple computers chapter I've got hacks on
sharing and syncing folders between computers (localy and over the
internet), synchronizing bookmarks across computers/browsers, sharing
printers and getting Windows on your Mac with Boot Camp.

Rob Hudson

unread,
Nov 27, 2007, 1:02:59 PM11/27/07
to lifehac...@googlegroups.com
Do you think there would be a demand for a "super techies" book? Maybe
something that focuses on developers and power users and talks about
home version control, advanced use of macro software like AutoHotkey,
developer communities, etc?

I also wonder if there shouldn't be a book on "office hacks" that has
some kind of "applied GTD" focus with DIY projects for establishing an
ideal physical environment for work. Something that could include
technology, but focus on creating a place where you can be productive.
David Allen provides some suggestions in his GTD book, but the
life-hacker-esque sites currently give more tactical advice that I
think could merit a book in itself.

Outside our scope?

peter.fi...@gmail.com

unread,
Nov 28, 2007, 9:33:20 AM11/28/07
to Lifehacker book 2.0
Sounds like it might be outside the immediate scope, but maybe if we
prod Gina there's a second book there to be worked on :}

Gina Trapani @ Lifehacker

unread,
Nov 29, 2007, 12:36:22 PM11/29/07
to lifehac...@googlegroups.com
On Nov 27, 2007 10:02 AM, Rob Hudson <cave...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Do you think there would be a demand for a "super techies" book? Maybe
> something that focuses on developers and power users and talks about
> home version control, advanced use of macro software like AutoHotkey,
> developer communities, etc?

There may be a demand for that kind of book, but I'm not sure. It's
definitely something to think about!


> I also wonder if there shouldn't be a book on "office hacks" that has
> some kind of "applied GTD" focus with DIY projects for establishing an
> ideal physical environment for work.

> Outside our scope?

It is outside the scope of this book, but I would love to see an
applied GTD book come from The David Allen Company. Problem is,
application has so much to do with a person's skill level, environment
and needs... that's why Lifehacker.com's just this continual stream of
things you *could* do, if they help you. This book is like that
too--a buffet of possible shortcuts that the reader picks and chooses
from.

Rob Hudson

unread,
Nov 29, 2007, 12:38:55 PM11/29/07
to lifehac...@googlegroups.com
Maybe I've been going about asking the wrong way..

What's the next LifeHacker book project after this one? Is there a
series planned, or will future books go in new directions?

I'm asking in part because I wonder if there would be opportunities
for others to work in a more formal capacity on the book outside of
the forum, for example, or if single authorship is preferred.

On Nov 29, 2007 11:36 AM, Gina Trapani @ Lifehacker

--
Rob Hudson
PhD Student, Technical Comm. and Rhetoric
Composition Assessment Software Developer
Texas Tech University
www.iteachwriting.com

Gina Trapani @ Lifehacker

unread,
Nov 30, 2007, 3:28:27 PM11/30/07
to lifehac...@googlegroups.com
On Nov 29, 2007 9:38 AM, Rob Hudson <cave...@gmail.com> wrote:
> What's the next LifeHacker book project after this one? Is there a
> series planned, or will future books go in new directions?

Ah, good question! There isn't a series planned (yet?) so I'm
honestly not sure right now. Personally, I prefer writing the web
site over writing the book, so it may be awhile before I embark on a
new book project.

> I'm asking in part because I wonder if there would be opportunities
> for others to work in a more formal capacity on the book outside of
> the forum, for example, or if single authorship is preferred.

AFAIK, single or dual authorship is the way it has to go with
traditional publishers, anyway (unless you're editing a compilation,
in which case there are many contributors but one or more editors
responsible and listed on the cover.)

It sounds like collaborating with a large group on a book may be more
of a wiki-type project, but you'd want a leader to grow it, then maybe
pitch the final content as a book. Things that make you go hmm....
Right now I'm so ridiculously busy finishing this book I can't even
think about the Next Thing, but I encourage anyone interested to go
for it! :)

Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages