Debian/Ubuntu Popularity Contest as a data source

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Eric

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Apr 10, 2011, 10:46:39 AM4/10/11
to LangPop
Hi,

Here's another data source you might want to consider when you have
time. Ubuntu and Debian track the popularity of every package in their
repositiories, and publish the stats in a convenient format:

http://popcon.debian.org/
http://popcon.ubuntu.com/

The "vote" column -- number of active users, as opposed to total
number of installations -- is probably the most appropriate.

Pro: Counting the popularity of specific compilers and interpreters
avoids ambiguity with C/C++/C#, Lisp, Scheme, etc.

Con: This seems like it would count the number of people who have
installed a given compiler/interpreter. Actually, I think it also
counts packages that are a dependency of something else (e.g. CouchDB
depends on Erlang), which could inflate interpreted languages. But
that might be a useful indicator, too, if a language is popular and
useful enough to be used as the basis for other popular software.

David Welton

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Apr 11, 2011, 4:36:17 PM4/11/11
to lan...@googlegroups.com, Eric
> Here's another data source you might want to consider when you have
> time. Ubuntu and Debian track the popularity of every package in their
> repositiories, and publish the stats in a convenient format:
>
> http://popcon.debian.org/
> http://popcon.ubuntu.com/

> The "vote" column -- number of active users, as opposed to total
> number of installations -- is probably the most appropriate.
>
> Pro: Counting the popularity of specific compilers and interpreters
> avoids ambiguity with C/C++/C#, Lisp, Scheme, etc.

Yeah, very precise results.

> Con: This seems like it would count the number of people who have
> installed a given compiler/interpreter. Actually, I think it also
> counts packages that are a dependency of something else (e.g. CouchDB
> depends on Erlang), which could inflate interpreted languages. But
> that might be a useful indicator, too, if a language is popular and
> useful enough to be used as the basis for other popular software.

I think the biggest 'con' is that we already have something of a free
software bias, between freshmeat, google code (which certainly doesn't
list code locked up in some bank), and I'm hesitant to add to that.
It is a good idea, however.

--
David N. Welton

http://www.welton.it/davidw/

http://www.dedasys.com/

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