Help: "A Ballade of the Scottysshe Kynge" by John Skelton

14 views
Skip to first unread message

Riccardo Venturi

unread,
Jun 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/14/99
to

As I already told you, I have some difficulties in translating into
Italian the following ballad. I humbly ask you for help, especially in
understanding the right meaning of some obscure passages. I thank in
advance all those who will help me in this task.

John Skelton (1460-1529) wrote "A Ballade of the Scottysshe Kynge"
immediately after the battle of Flodden Field (1513). This spirited
(and scornful) celebration of the victory of the English Army is the
oldest ballad ever recorded in a "Broadside" (i.e., a sheet of paper
printed on one side only, forming one large page). Broadsides (also
called "Broadsheets") were sold for a penny or half-penny apiece in
the streets of London and provincial towns.

A BALLADE OF THE SCOTTYSSHE KYNGE
__________________________________________________

Kyng Jamy / Jamy your Joye is all go
Ye sommnoed our kynge why dyde ye so?
> sommnoed = summoned? (It. "provocare"?)
To you nothyng it dyde accorde
To sommon our skynge your soverayne lorde.
A kynge a somner it is wonder
Knowe ye not salt and suger asonder?
In your sommynge ye were to malaperte
> malaperte = ?
And your harolde no thynge experte.
> I don't understand the right meaning here.
Ye thought ye dide it sull valyauntolye
But not worth thre skippes of a pye.
> Help !
Syr quyer galyarde ye were to swyfte
> Quyer = ?
Your wyll renne before your wytte.
To be so scornfull to your alye
Your counseyle was not worth a flye.
Before the frensshe kynge /danes/ and other

Ye ought to honour your lorde and brother.
Trowe ye syr James his noble grace

For you and your scottes wolde tourne his face
Now ye prode scottes of gelawaye
> gelawaye = Galloway?
For your kynge may synge welawaye.
> welawaye = ?
Now you must knowe our kynge for your regent

Your soverayne lorde and presedent
In hym is figured melchideseche

And ye be desolate as armeleche.
> armeleche = ?
He is our noble champyon

A kynge anoynted and ye be non,
Thrugh your counseyle your fader was slayne

Wherfore I fere ye wyll suffre payne
And ye proude scottes of dunbar

Parde ye be his homager
> Parde = ?
And suters to his parlyment
> Suters = ?
Ye dyde not your dewty therin.
> Dewty = duty ?
Wyerfore ye may it now repent

Ye bere yourselfe som what to holde
> ?
Therfore ye have lost your copholde
> copholde = copyhold?
Ye be bounde tenauntes to his estate

Gyve up your game ye playe chekmate
For to the castell of norham

I understonde to soone ye cam.
For a prysoner now ye be

Eyther to the devyll or the trinite.
Thanked be saynte Gorge our ladyes knythe

Your pryd is paste adwe good nyght.
> adwe = adieu?
Ye have determyned to make a fraye

Our kynge then beynge out of the waye
But by the power and myght of god

Ye were beten with your owne rod.
By your wanton wyll syr at a worde

Ye have lost spores, cote armure, and sworde
Ye had better to have busked to huntey bankes

Than in England to playe ony suche prankes
But ye had som wyle sede to sowe

Therefore ye be layde now full lowe,
Your power coude no longer atteyne

Warre with our kynge to meyntayne
Of the kyng of naverne ye may take hede
> naverne = Navarre?
How unfortunately he doth now spede,
In double welles now he doeth dreme.

That is a kynge witou a realme
At hym example ye wolde none take

Experyence hath brought you in the same brake
Of the out yles ye rough foted scottes

We have well eased you of the bottes
> ??
Ye rowe ranke scottes and dronken danes

Of our englysshe bowes ye have fette your banes.
It is not syttynge in tour of towne

A somner to were a kynges crowne
That noble erle the whyte Lyon,

Your pompe and pryde hath layde a downe
His sone the lorde admyrall is full good

His swerd hath bathed in the scottes blode
God save kynge Henry and his lordes all

And sende the frensshe kynge suche an other fall
Amen / for saynt charite
And god save noble
Kynge /Henry
The VIII.

> Riccardo Venturi <05868...@iol.it>
> Er muoz gelīchesame die leiter abewerfen
> So er an īr ūfgestigen ist (Vogelweide)

Francesca Monacelli

unread,
Jun 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/14/99
to Riccardo Venturi
I am sorry I can only help on just a few of your points.

ciao for now
Francesca Monacelli
Engl -> Ital translator

Riccardo Venturi wrote:

> As I already told you, I have some difficulties in translating into
> Italian the following ballad. I humbly ask you for help, especially in
> understanding the right meaning of some obscure passages. I thank in
> advance all those who will help me in this task.
>
> John Skelton (1460-1529) wrote "A Ballade of the Scottysshe Kynge"
> immediately after the battle of Flodden Field (1513). This spirited
> (and scornful) celebration of the victory of the English Army is the
> oldest ballad ever recorded in a "Broadside" (i.e., a sheet of paper
> printed on one side only, forming one large page). Broadsides (also
> called "Broadsheets") were sold for a penny or half-penny apiece in
> the streets of London and provincial towns.
>
> A BALLADE OF THE SCOTTYSSHE KYNGE
> __________________________________________________
>
> Kyng Jamy / Jamy your Joye is all go
> Ye sommnoed our kynge why dyde ye so?

> > sommnoed = summoned? (It. "provocare"?) MINACCIARE


> To you nothyng it dyde accorde
> To sommon our skynge your soverayne lorde.
> A kynge a somner it is wonder
> Knowe ye not salt and suger asonder?
> In your sommynge ye were to malaperte
> > malaperte = ?
> And your harolde no thynge experte.
> > I don't understand the right meaning here.
> Ye thought ye dide it sull valyauntolye
> But not worth thre skippes of a pye.
> > Help !
> Syr quyer galyarde ye were to swyfte
> > Quyer = ?
> Your wyll renne before your wytte.
> To be so scornfull to your alye
> Your counseyle was not worth a flye.
> Before the frensshe kynge /danes/ and other
>
> Ye ought to honour your lorde and brother.
> Trowe ye syr James his noble grace
>
> For you and your scottes wolde tourne his face
> Now ye prode scottes of gelawaye

> > gelawaye = Galloway? SI'', SEMBRA IL
> NOME DEL POSTO


> For your kynge may synge welawaye.
> > welawaye = ?
> Now you must knowe our kynge for your regent
>
> Your soverayne lorde and presedent
> In hym is figured melchideseche
>
> And ye be desolate as armeleche.
> > armeleche = ?
> He is our noble champyon
>
> A kynge anoynted and ye be non,
> Thrugh your counseyle your fader was slayne
>
> Wherfore I fere ye wyll suffre payne
> And ye proude scottes of dunbar
>
> Parde ye be his homager
> > Parde = ?
> And suters to his parlyment
> > Suters = ?
> Ye dyde not your dewty therin.

> > Dewty = duty ? SI'


> Wyerfore ye may it now repent
>
> Ye bere yourselfe som what to holde
> > ?
> Therfore ye have lost your copholde
> > copholde = copyhold?
> Ye be bounde tenauntes to his estate
>
> Gyve up your game ye playe chekmate
> For to the castell of norham
>
> I understonde to soone ye cam.
> For a prysoner now ye be
>
> Eyther to the devyll or the trinite.
> Thanked be saynte Gorge our ladyes knythe
>
> Your pryd is paste adwe good nyght.

> > adwe = adieu? SI

Mary Cassidy

unread,
Jun 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/14/99
to
Riccardo Venturi ha scritto:

> As I already told you, I have some difficulties in translating into
> Italian the following ballad. I humbly ask you for help, especially in
> understanding the right meaning of some obscure passages. I thank in
> advance all those who will help me in this task.
>
>

Ciao, Riccardo,
Adesso che abbiamo fatto la pace, possiamo darci del tu?

La tua versione č leggermente diversa da quella che ho trovato a
http://www.drake.edu/swiss/kynge.html, che ti conviene guardare; infatti
la tua contiene (secondo me) qualche errore tipografico, che lo rende piů
difficile da capire. Laddove la mia versione č diversa della tua, ho messo
la mia tra parentesi.
Premesso che non ho studiato il Middle English, questa č la mia
interpretazione:

> Ye sommnoed our kynge why dyde ye so?
> > sommnoed = summoned?

Si.

> (It. "provocare"?)

No - significa convocava (in modo perentorio)

> In your sommynge ye were to malaperte
> > malaperte = ?
>

Impudent.

> And your harolde no thynge experte.
> > I don't understand the right meaning here.
>

Forse: "your herald was not experienced" ??

> Ye thought ye dide it sull valyauntolye

(Ye thought ye dyde it full valyauntolye)
You thought you did it very valiantly (= You thought you did it very
bravely/well)


> But not worth thre skippes of a pye.
>

Ma non valeva tre salti di un pisello (?) (=non valeva niente)

> Syr quyer galyarde ye were to swyfte

(Syr squyer-galyarde ye were to swyfte)

> > Quyer = ?
>

Squire

> Now ye prode scottes of gelawaye
> > gelawaye = Galloway?

Si.

> For your kynge may synge welawaye.
> > welawaye = ?

Alas (ahinoi).

> And ye be desolate as armeleche.
> > armeleche = ?

(And ye be desolate as Armeleche)Nome proprio, ma non ho idea di che si
tratta. Non credo sia biblico; almeno con quell' ortografia non l'ho
trovato nel Concordance.


> Parde ye be his homager
> > Parde = ?

Forse pardi = by God.

> And suters to his parlyment
> > Suters = ?

Suitors (supplicanti)

> Ye dyde not your dewty therin.
> > Dewty = duty ?

Si.

> Ye bere yourselfe som what to holde
>

(Ye bere yourselfe somwhat to bolde)
You bear yourself somewhat too bold (=you act too boldly)

> Therfore ye have lost your copholde
> > copholde = copyhold?

(Therfore ye have lost your copyholde)

> Your pryd is paste adwe good nyght.
> > adwe = adieu?

Si.

> Of the kyng of naverne ye may take hede
> > naverne = Navarre?

Si.

> Of the out yles ye rough foted scottes
> We have well eased you of the bottes
>

(Credo) We have relieved you rough-footed Scots of your boots (cioč) the
Outer Islands.

HTH
Mary
(remove "nospam" to reply)

---
That was as easy as 3.1415926535897932384626433832795028841.


Riccardo Venturi

unread,
Jun 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/14/99
to
On Mon, 14 Jun 1999 14:25:13 +0200, Francesca Monacelli
<n.d...@frankfurt.netsurf.de> wrote:

>I am sorry I can only help on just a few of your points.

Thank you Francesca. This text is really difficult and anyone's help
is precious to me.

Riccardo Venturi

unread,
Jun 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/14/99
to
On Mon, 14 Jun 1999 14:29:06 +0200, Mary Cassidy
<cas...@nospamgvo.it> wrote:


>Ciao, Riccardo,
>Adesso che abbiamo fatto la pace, possiamo darci del tu?

Mai stata guerra, Mary :o)) Certamente che possiamo darci del tu, mi
fa molto piacere.


>La tua versione è leggermente diversa da quella che ho trovato a


>http://www.drake.edu/swiss/kynge.html, che ti conviene guardare; infatti

>la tua contiene (secondo me) qualche errore tipografico, che lo rende più
>difficile da capire. Laddove la mia versione è diversa della tua, ho messo
>la mia tra parentesi.
Premessa: il mio testo proviene dal "Faber Book of Ballads" (edited by
Matthew Hodgart; London, Faber and Faber, 1965, p. 161). Subito dopo
aver letto il tuo post mi sono precipitato ad aprire il sito che mi
avevi anche a suo tempo, ed ho visto le differenze che, in diversi
casi, chiariscono decisamente il testo. Ho comunque seguito qui il
testo già in mio possesso proprio per confrontare le due versioni
(quella dello Hodgart sembra in alcuni punti contenere dei
"misspellings" dovuti ad un'errata trascrizione del broadside).

>Premesso che non ho studiato il Middle English, questa è la mia
>interpretazione:
Non è Middle English. Potremmo chiamarlo "Early New English", credo
che sia la definizione più adatta. Già con Caxton la fase media è già
decisamente superata, ed anche nelle vere ballate popolari e nella
"minstrelsy" quattrocentesca (come ad esempio in "Robyn and Gandeleyn"
o "Robyn Hude and þe Munke", entrambe preservate in manoscritti del
1450 circa) siamo già in una decisa fase di passaggio.

Passiamo alle tue proposte di lettura:

>> Ye sommnoed our kynge why dyde ye so?
>> > sommnoed = summoned?
>Si.

Ok. Hai notato la quantità di varianti grafiche di questo povero
verbo? :-)

>> (It. "provocare"?)
>>No - significa convocava (in modo perentorio)

Quindi potrebbe essere che lo ha "convocato" perentoriamente ad
attaccare battaglia? La storia comunque riporta che, prima della
battaglia di Flodden, il re di Scozia aveva effettivamente provocato
Enrico VIII in diverse occasioni (da qui la mia traduzione; secondo te
potrebbe andar bene qualcosa come "sfidare"?). Esiste anche una folk
ballad intitolata "Flodden Field" che riporta i fatti abbastanza
precisamente.

>> In your sommynge ye were to malaperte
>> > malaperte = ?
> Impudent.

Ok.

> And your harolde no thynge experte.
>> > I don't understand the right meaning here.
>> Forse: "your herald was not experienced" ??

Ci avevo pensato anch'io, ma "experienced" di che cosa? Il senso
parrebbe forse più suggerire che l'araldo non sapeva esattamente come
stavano le cose. "Not experienced" potrebbe, ti chiedo, avere il senso
di "unaware" (inconsapevole)?

>> Ye thought ye dide it sull valyauntolye
>(Ye thought ye dyde it full valyauntolye)
>You thought you did it very valiantly (= You thought you did it very
>bravely/well)

Qui la tua correzione ortografica chiarisce benissimo il senso.
Seguendo il mio testo avevo fatto diverse congetture su quel "sull",
sviato dall'antica forma verbale "sull" (= should) particolarmente
frequente nelle ballate popolari di quell'epoca, specialmente quelle
scozzesi. Scartata quest'ipotesi (uno "should" sarebbe un'autentica
incongruenza nel testo), avevo pensato a "sull" = "such" (inglese e
scozzese medio "sulk", "silk", "sic" ecc.) usato avverbialmente e con
una qualche forma di assimilazione finale. Non ho però reperito alcuna
attestazione del genere.

>> But not worth thre skippes of a pye.
>>Ma non valeva tre salti di un pisello (?) (=non valeva niente)

Il senso dev'essere sicuramente questo, è indubbio.

>> Syr quyer galyarde ye were to swyfte
>>(Syr squyer-galyarde ye were to swyfte)>
>> Quyer = ?
>>Squire

Ok. Anche qui un'altra errata trascrizione nel mio testo, penso.

>> Now ye prode scottes of gelawaye
>> > gelawaye = Galloway?
>>Si.

Ok.

>> For your kynge may synge welawaye.
>> > welawaye = ?
>Alas (ahinoi).

Credo che "alas" sia l'esclamazione più frequente in tutta la
"balladry" in lingua inglese... :o)))

>> And ye be desolate as armeleche.
> > armeleche = ?
>(And ye be desolate as Armeleche)Nome proprio, ma non ho idea di che si
>tratta. Non credo sia biblico; almeno con quell' ortografia non l'ho
>trovato nel Concordance.

Nella Bibbia esiste un " Amalek" (o "Amalech"). Bisogna appunto
vedere se la grafia "armeleche" è attestata altrove.

>> Parde ye be his homager
>> > Parde = ?
>> Forse pardi = by God.

Ok. Sarebbe quindi il francese "Pardieu"! ("pardi" è un eufemismo
presente anche nel francese moderno).

>> And suters to his parlyment
>> > Suters = ?
>>Suitors (supplicanti)

Ok.

>> Ye dyde not your dewty therin.
>> > Dewty = duty ?
>>Si.

Ok.

>> Ye bere yourselfe som what to holde
>>
>(Ye bere yourselfe somwhat to bolde)
>You bear yourself somewhat too bold (=you act too boldly)

Anche qui il testo in mio possesso deve contenere un errore di
trascrizione. "Bolde" è perfetto nel contesto, ovviamente.

>> Therfore ye have lost your copholde
>> > copholde = copyhold?
>>(Therfore ye have lost your copyholde)

Ok.

>> Your pryd is paste adwe good nyght.
>> > adwe = adieu?
>Si.

Ok.


>
>> Of the kyng of naverne ye may take hede
>> > naverne = Navarre?
>Si.

Ok.

>> Of the out yles ye rough foted scottes
>> We have well eased you of the bottes

>(Credo) We have relieved you rough-footed Scots of your boots (cioè) the
>Outer Islands.
Ti chiedo solo: potrebbe essere accettabile anche "bottes" = "boats"?


>HTH
>Mary
>(remove "nospam" to reply)

Thank you Mary!

> Riccardo Venturi <05868...@iol.it>
> Er muoz gelîchesame die leiter abewerfen
> So er an îr ûfgestigen ist (Vogelweide)

Mary Cassidy

unread,
Jun 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/14/99
to
Riccardo Venturi ha scritto:

> On Mon, 14 Jun 1999 14:29:06 +0200, Mary Cassidy
> <cas...@nospamgvo.it> wrote:
>
> >> Ye sommnoed our kynge why dyde ye so?
> >> > sommnoed = summoned?
> >Si.
>

> >> (It. "provocare"?)


> >>No - significa convocava (in modo perentorio)
>

> Quindi potrebbe essere che lo ha "convocato" perentoriamente ad
> attaccare battaglia? La storia comunque riporta che, prima della
> battaglia di Flodden, il re di Scozia aveva effettivamente provocato
> Enrico VIII in diverse occasioni (da qui la mia traduzione; secondo te
> potrebbe andar bene qualcosa come "sfidare"?). Esiste anche una folk
> ballad intitolata "Flodden Field" che riporta i fatti abbastanza
> precisamente.

Boh. Ecco quello che dicono al sito che ti ho dato nel mio primo messaggio
(http://www.drake.edu/swiss/skelton.html):

"In 1513, Henry VIII went to France to try his hand at war for the first time.
Like many English kings before him, Henry believed it was his duty to unite the
two countries under a single crown -- his own. What Henry didn't know was that
even as he was preparing to conquer France, the Scottish king, James IV, was
preparing to invade England. Having earlier signed a treaty with the French,
James sent a message to Henry, demanding that Henry not go to France. But by
the time Henry got the message, he had already embarked on his mission, and
luckless, impatient James had invaded England and
been killed near Norham Castle. "

Se questo è vero, non fu né una sfida né un "summons", piuttosto una diffida.

> > And your harolde no thynge experte.
> >> > I don't understand the right meaning here.
> >> Forse: "your herald was not experienced" ??
> Ci avevo pensato anch'io, ma "experienced" di che cosa? Il senso
> parrebbe forse più suggerire che l'araldo non sapeva esattamente come
> stavano le cose.

> "Not experienced" potrebbe, ti chiedo, avere il senso
> di "unaware" (inconsapevole)?

Normalmente no. Non capisco veramente cosa intende l'autore qui.

> Credo che "alas" sia l'esclamazione più frequente in tutta la
> "balladry" in lingua inglese... :o)))

La vita non era mica tanto allegra a quei tempi :-)

> >> And ye be desolate as armeleche.

> Nella Bibbia esiste un " Amalek" (o "Amalech"). Bisogna appunto
> vedere se la grafia "armeleche" è attestata altrove.

Si, adesso l'ho trovato; infatti il paese degli Amalechiti fu completamente
distrutto, quindi può darsi che sia quello. Avevo pensato anche alla storia di
Abramo e Abimelech, ma la grafia è troppo diversa.

> >> Of the out yles ye rough foted scottes
> >> We have well eased you of the bottes
> >(Credo) We have relieved you rough-footed Scots of your boots (cioè) the
> >Outer Islands.
> Ti chiedo solo: potrebbe essere accettabile anche "bottes" = "boats"?
>

Non saprei; qui avevo in mente il francese "bottes" = stivali e il riferimento
ai piedi. Come probabilmente sai meglio di me, "boot" deriva dal MF "bote", e
"boat" dal ME "boot", che a sua volta deriva dal OE "bat". E' vero che gli
inglesi hanno attaccato le navi scozzesi, ma qui la metafora dei piedi mi
suggerisce piuttosto "boots" - ricordati che anche se fu politicamente
impegnato, Skelton scrisse sempre in modo divertente. Inoltre, "ease off" rende
l'idea di tirare via gli stivali stretti. Forse le isole in questione hanno la
forma dello stivale? Comunque, sto tirando ad indovinare.

Per risolvere questi dubbi, ci dovrebbe essere da qualche parte una versione
annotata in inglese, o no?

Mary
(remove "nospam" to reply)

---
I think, therefore I am overqualified.


Valeria

unread,
Jun 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/14/99
to

Riccardo Venturi <05868...@iol.it> scritto nell'articolo
<3764ca3e...@news.megasys.it>...

Riccardo, sei straordinario: ti trovo dappertutto!

Un saluto a tutti da Valeria, gucciniana di passaggio.

>
> > Riccardo Venturi <05868...@iol.it>
> > Er muoz gelīchesame die leiter abewerfen
> > So er an īr ūfgestigen ist (Vogelweide)
>
>

Francesca Monacelli

unread,
Jun 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/14/99
to Mary Cassidy
con "summon" si puo' anche intendere "intimare" , meno forte del mio minacciare
iniziale e piu'in linea con quanto scritto qui sotto = diffida.

che ne pensate?

ciao for now
Francesca

Mary Cassidy wrote:

> Riccardo Venturi ha scritto:


>
> > On Mon, 14 Jun 1999 14:29:06 +0200, Mary Cassidy
> > <cas...@nospamgvo.it> wrote:
> >
> > >> Ye sommnoed our kynge why dyde ye so?
> > >> > sommnoed = summoned?
> > >Si.
> >
>

> > >> (It. "provocare"?)
> > >>No - significa convocava (in modo perentorio)
> >
>
> > Quindi potrebbe essere che lo ha "convocato" perentoriamente ad
> > attaccare battaglia? La storia comunque riporta che, prima della
> > battaglia di Flodden, il re di Scozia aveva effettivamente provocato
> > Enrico VIII in diverse occasioni (da qui la mia traduzione; secondo te
> > potrebbe andar bene qualcosa come "sfidare"?). Esiste anche una folk
> > ballad intitolata "Flodden Field" che riporta i fatti abbastanza
> > precisamente.
>

> Boh. Ecco quello che dicono al sito che ti ho dato nel mio primo messaggio
> (http://www.drake.edu/swiss/skelton.html):
>
> "In 1513, Henry VIII went to France to try his hand at war for the first time.
> Like many English kings before him, Henry believed it was his duty to unite the
> two countries under a single crown -- his own. What Henry didn't know was that
> even as he was preparing to conquer France, the Scottish king, James IV, was
> preparing to invade England. Having earlier signed a treaty with the French,
> James sent a message to Henry, demanding that Henry not go to France. But by
> the time Henry got the message, he had already embarked on his mission, and
> luckless, impatient James had invaded England and
> been killed near Norham Castle. "
>

> Se questo č vero, non fu né una sfida né un "summons", piuttosto una diffida.


>
> > > And your harolde no thynge experte.
> > >> > I don't understand the right meaning here.
> > >> Forse: "your herald was not experienced" ??
> > Ci avevo pensato anch'io, ma "experienced" di che cosa? Il senso

> > parrebbe forse piů suggerire che l'araldo non sapeva esattamente come


> > stavano le cose.
>
> > "Not experienced" potrebbe, ti chiedo, avere il senso
> > di "unaware" (inconsapevole)?
>

> Normalmente no. Non capisco veramente cosa intende l'autore qui.
>

> > Credo che "alas" sia l'esclamazione piů frequente in tutta la


> > "balladry" in lingua inglese... :o)))
>

> La vita non era mica tanto allegra a quei tempi :-)
>

> > >> And ye be desolate as armeleche.

> > Nella Bibbia esiste un " Amalek" (o "Amalech"). Bisogna appunto

> > vedere se la grafia "armeleche" č attestata altrove.


>
> Si, adesso l'ho trovato; infatti il paese degli Amalechiti fu completamente

> distrutto, quindi puň darsi che sia quello. Avevo pensato anche alla storia di
> Abramo e Abimelech, ma la grafia č troppo diversa.


>
> > >> Of the out yles ye rough foted scottes
> > >> We have well eased you of the bottes

> > >(Credo) We have relieved you rough-footed Scots of your boots (cioč) the


> > >Outer Islands.
> > Ti chiedo solo: potrebbe essere accettabile anche "bottes" = "boats"?
> >
>

> Non saprei; qui avevo in mente il francese "bottes" = stivali e il riferimento
> ai piedi. Come probabilmente sai meglio di me, "boot" deriva dal MF "bote", e
> "boat" dal ME "boot", che a sua volta deriva dal OE "bat". E' vero che gli
> inglesi hanno attaccato le navi scozzesi, ma qui la metafora dei piedi mi
> suggerisce piuttosto "boots" - ricordati che anche se fu politicamente
> impegnato, Skelton scrisse sempre in modo divertente. Inoltre, "ease off" rende
> l'idea di tirare via gli stivali stretti. Forse le isole in questione hanno la
> forma dello stivale? Comunque, sto tirando ad indovinare.
>
> Per risolvere questi dubbi, ci dovrebbe essere da qualche parte una versione
> annotata in inglese, o no?
>

> Mary
> (remove "nospam" to reply)
>

Francesca Monacelli

unread,
Jun 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/14/99
to Mary Cassidy
con "summon" si puo' anche intendere "intimare" , meno forte del mio minacciare
iniziale e piu'in linea con quanto scritto qui sotto = diffida.

che ne pensate?

ciao for now
Francesca

Mary Cassidy wrote:

> Riccardo Venturi ha scritto:


>
> > On Mon, 14 Jun 1999 14:29:06 +0200, Mary Cassidy
> > <cas...@nospamgvo.it> wrote:
> >
> > >> Ye sommnoed our kynge why dyde ye so?
> > >> > sommnoed = summoned?
> > >Si.
> >
>

> > >> (It. "provocare"?)
> > >>No - significa convocava (in modo perentorio)
> >
>
> > Quindi potrebbe essere che lo ha "convocato" perentoriamente ad
> > attaccare battaglia? La storia comunque riporta che, prima della
> > battaglia di Flodden, il re di Scozia aveva effettivamente provocato
> > Enrico VIII in diverse occasioni (da qui la mia traduzione; secondo te
> > potrebbe andar bene qualcosa come "sfidare"?). Esiste anche una folk
> > ballad intitolata "Flodden Field" che riporta i fatti abbastanza
> > precisamente.
>

> Boh. Ecco quello che dicono al sito che ti ho dato nel mio primo messaggio
> (http://www.drake.edu/swiss/skelton.html):
>
> "In 1513, Henry VIII went to France to try his hand at war for the first time.
> Like many English kings before him, Henry believed it was his duty to unite the
> two countries under a single crown -- his own. What Henry didn't know was that
> even as he was preparing to conquer France, the Scottish king, James IV, was
> preparing to invade England. Having earlier signed a treaty with the French,
> James sent a message to Henry, demanding that Henry not go to France. But by
> the time Henry got the message, he had already embarked on his mission, and
> luckless, impatient James had invaded England and
> been killed near Norham Castle. "
>
> Se questo č vero, non fu né una sfida né un "summons", piuttosto una diffida.
>

> > > And your harolde no thynge experte.
> > >> > I don't understand the right meaning here.
> > >> Forse: "your herald was not experienced" ??
> > Ci avevo pensato anch'io, ma "experienced" di che cosa? Il senso

> > parrebbe forse piů suggerire che l'araldo non sapeva esattamente come


> > stavano le cose.
>
> > "Not experienced" potrebbe, ti chiedo, avere il senso
> > di "unaware" (inconsapevole)?
>

> Normalmente no. Non capisco veramente cosa intende l'autore qui.
>

> > Credo che "alas" sia l'esclamazione piů frequente in tutta la


> > "balladry" in lingua inglese... :o)))
>

> La vita non era mica tanto allegra a quei tempi :-)
>

> > >> And ye be desolate as armeleche.

> > Nella Bibbia esiste un " Amalek" (o "Amalech"). Bisogna appunto

> > vedere se la grafia "armeleche" č attestata altrove.
>
> Si, adesso l'ho trovato; infatti il paese degli Amalechiti fu completamente
> distrutto, quindi puň darsi che sia quello. Avevo pensato anche alla storia di
> Abramo e Abimelech, ma la grafia č troppo diversa.
>

> > >> Of the out yles ye rough foted scottes
> > >> We have well eased you of the bottes

> > >(Credo) We have relieved you rough-footed Scots of your boots (cioč) the


> > >Outer Islands.
> > Ti chiedo solo: potrebbe essere accettabile anche "bottes" = "boats"?
> >
>

> Non saprei; qui avevo in mente il francese "bottes" = stivali e il riferimento
> ai piedi. Come probabilmente sai meglio di me, "boot" deriva dal MF "bote", e
> "boat" dal ME "boot", che a sua volta deriva dal OE "bat". E' vero che gli
> inglesi hanno attaccato le navi scozzesi, ma qui la metafora dei piedi mi
> suggerisce piuttosto "boots" - ricordati che anche se fu politicamente
> impegnato, Skelton scrisse sempre in modo divertente. Inoltre, "ease off" rende
> l'idea di tirare via gli stivali stretti. Forse le isole in questione hanno la
> forma dello stivale? Comunque, sto tirando ad indovinare.
>
> Per risolvere questi dubbi, ci dovrebbe essere da qualche parte una versione
> annotata in inglese, o no?
>

> Mary
> (remove "nospam" to reply)
>

Francesca Monacelli

unread,
Jun 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/14/99
to Riccardo Venturi
con "summon" si puo' anche intendere "intimare" , meno forte del mio
minacciare iniziale e piu'in linea con il suggerimento di Mary "diffida".

che ne pensate?

ciao for now
Francesca

Riccardo Venturi wrote:

> As I already told you, I have some difficulties in translating into
> Italian the following ballad. I humbly ask you for help, especially in
> understanding the right meaning of some obscure passages. I thank in
> advance all those who will help me in this task.
>

> John Skelton (1460-1529) wrote "A Ballade of the Scottysshe Kynge"
> immediately after the battle of Flodden Field (1513). This spirited
> (and scornful) celebration of the victory of the English Army is the
> oldest ballad ever recorded in a "Broadside" (i.e., a sheet of paper
> printed on one side only, forming one large page). Broadsides (also
> called "Broadsheets") were sold for a penny or half-penny apiece in
> the streets of London and provincial towns.
>
> A BALLADE OF THE SCOTTYSSHE KYNGE
> __________________________________________________
>
> Kyng Jamy / Jamy your Joye is all go

> Ye sommnoed our kynge why dyde ye so?

> > sommnoed = summoned? (It. "provocare"?)


> To you nothyng it dyde accorde
> To sommon our skynge your soverayne lorde.
> A kynge a somner it is wonder
> Knowe ye not salt and suger asonder?

> In your sommynge ye were to malaperte
> > malaperte = ?

> And your harolde no thynge experte.
> > I don't understand the right meaning here.

> Ye thought ye dide it sull valyauntolye

> But not worth thre skippes of a pye.

> > Help !


> Syr quyer galyarde ye were to swyfte

> > Quyer = ?
> Your wyll renne before your wytte.
> To be so scornfull to your alye
> Your counseyle was not worth a flye.
> Before the frensshe kynge /danes/ and other
>
> Ye ought to honour your lorde and brother.
> Trowe ye syr James his noble grace
>
> For you and your scottes wolde tourne his face

> Now ye prode scottes of gelawaye
> > gelawaye = Galloway?

> For your kynge may synge welawaye.
> > welawaye = ?

> Now you must knowe our kynge for your regent
>
> Your soverayne lorde and presedent
> In hym is figured melchideseche
>

> And ye be desolate as armeleche.

> > armeleche = ?
> He is our noble champyon
>
> A kynge anoynted and ye be non,
> Thrugh your counseyle your fader was slayne
>
> Wherfore I fere ye wyll suffre payne
> And ye proude scottes of dunbar
>

> Parde ye be his homager
> > Parde = ?

> And suters to his parlyment
> > Suters = ?

> Ye dyde not your dewty therin.
> > Dewty = duty ?

> Wyerfore ye may it now repent
>

> Ye bere yourselfe som what to holde

> > ?


> Therfore ye have lost your copholde
> > copholde = copyhold?

> Ye be bounde tenauntes to his estate
>
> Gyve up your game ye playe chekmate
> For to the castell of norham
>
> I understonde to soone ye cam.
> For a prysoner now ye be
>
> Eyther to the devyll or the trinite.
> Thanked be saynte Gorge our ladyes knythe
>

> Your pryd is paste adwe good nyght.
> > adwe = adieu?

> Ye have determyned to make a fraye
>
> Our kynge then beynge out of the waye
> But by the power and myght of god
>
> Ye were beten with your owne rod.
> By your wanton wyll syr at a worde
>
> Ye have lost spores, cote armure, and sworde
> Ye had better to have busked to huntey bankes
>
> Than in England to playe ony suche prankes
> But ye had som wyle sede to sowe
>
> Therefore ye be layde now full lowe,
> Your power coude no longer atteyne
>
> Warre with our kynge to meyntayne

> Of the kyng of naverne ye may take hede
> > naverne = Navarre?

> How unfortunately he doth now spede,
> In double welles now he doeth dreme.
>
> That is a kynge witou a realme
> At hym example ye wolde none take
>
> Experyence hath brought you in the same brake

> Of the out yles ye rough foted scottes
>
> We have well eased you of the bottes

> > ??
> Ye rowe ranke scottes and dronken danes
>
> Of our englysshe bowes ye have fette your banes.
> It is not syttynge in tour of towne
>
> A somner to were a kynges crowne
> That noble erle the whyte Lyon,
>
> Your pompe and pryde hath layde a downe
> His sone the lorde admyrall is full good
>
> His swerd hath bathed in the scottes blode
> God save kynge Henry and his lordes all
>
> And sende the frensshe kynge suche an other fall
> Amen / for saynt charite
> And god save noble
> Kynge /Henry
> The VIII.
>

Francesca Monacelli

unread,
Jun 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/14/99
to
scusate la triplice e-mail!!
ho avuto problemi col collegamento in rete!
ciao buona serata
Francesca

Riccardo Venturi

unread,
Jun 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/14/99
to
On Mon, 14 Jun 1999 18:18:47 +0200, Mary Cassidy
<cas...@nospamgvo.it> wrote:

>Riccardo Venturi ha scritto:

>Boh. Ecco quello che dicono al sito che ti ho dato nel mio primo messaggio
>(http://www.drake.edu/swiss/skelton.html):
>
>"In 1513, Henry VIII

// snip //


>been killed near Norham Castle. "
>

>Se questo è vero, non fu né una sfida né un "summons", piuttosto una diffida.
Perfetto. Ora cominciano i "dolori" per me. Devo inserire "diffidare"
nello schema metrico della traduzione italiana.. :o))))


>> "Not experienced" potrebbe, ti chiedo, avere il senso
>> di "unaware" (inconsapevole)?
>

>Normalmente no. Non capisco veramente cosa intende l'autore qui.

Mi sa che mi toccherà fare una "séance" ed evocare lo spirito di John
Skelton... mannaggia a lui e al suo Scottysshe Kynge, mi sta bloccando
un libro già finito..:o)))


>> Credo che "alas" sia l'esclamazione più frequente in tutta la
>> "balladry" in lingua inglese... :o)))
>

>La vita non era mica tanto allegra a quei tempi :-)

"O I'll gar burn for you, Maisry
Your father an your mother;
An' I'll gar burn for you, Maisry,
Your sister an' your brother.
An' I'll gar burn for you, Maisry,
The chief of a' your kin;
An' the last bonfire that I come to
Mysel' I will cast in."
["Lady Maisry", Child 65, 30-31. A typical ballad "Happy end"...:o) ]

>> >> And ye be desolate as armeleche.

>> Nella Bibbia esiste un " Amalek" (o "Amalech"). Bisogna appunto
>> vedere se la grafia "armeleche" è attestata altrove.
>

>Si, adesso l'ho trovato; infatti il paese degli Amalechiti fu completamente

>distrutto, quindi può darsi che sia quello. Avevo pensato anche alla storia di
>Abramo e Abimelech, ma la grafia è troppo diversa.
Il senso tornerebbe perfettamente....


>Non saprei; qui avevo in mente il francese "bottes" = stivali e il riferimento
>ai piedi. Come probabilmente sai meglio di me, "boot" deriva dal MF "bote", e
>"boat" dal ME "boot"

[la forma ME è generalmente ancora "bat" o "bot", pl. prevalentemente
"botes"; cfr. F.H.Stratmann, A Middle English Dictionary, Oxford
University Press, 1974; C.T.Onions, The Oxford Dictionary of English
Etymology, p. 103]


>che a sua volta deriva dal OE "bat". E' vero che gli
>inglesi hanno attaccato le navi scozzesi, ma qui la metafora dei piedi mi
>suggerisce piuttosto "boots" - ricordati che anche se fu politicamente
>impegnato, Skelton scrisse sempre in modo divertente. Inoltre, "ease off" rende
>l'idea di tirare via gli stivali stretti. Forse le isole in questione hanno la
>forma dello stivale? Comunque, sto tirando ad indovinare.

Su quest'ultimo punto, mi sono dimenticato l'atlante geografico in
studio. Domani controllo e ti so dire..:o)

>Per risolvere questi dubbi, ci dovrebbe essere da qualche parte una versione
>annotata in inglese, o no?

Eh, è proprio questo il punto. Ho deciso di inserire la Ballad of the
Scottysshe Kynge all'ultimo momento, e non mi è riuscito di trovare se
non il testo senza annotazioni... altrimenti non sarei venuto qui a
darvi noia, o perlomeno non ve ne avrei data così tanta...:o)))
Comunque ti sei meritata perlomeno una citazione nella prefazione.:o))

>Mary
>(remove "nospam" to reply)

Grazie ancora,

Riccardo Venturi

unread,
Jun 14, 1999, 3:00:00 AM6/14/99
to
On 14 Jun 1999 16:08:26 GMT, "Valeria" <va...@insinet.it> wrote:


>Riccardo, sei straordinario: ti trovo dappertutto!

So' peggio delle formģ'ole...

>Un saluto a tutti da Valeria, gucciniana di passaggio.

Saluti in trasferta :-))

> Riccardo Venturi <05868...@iol.it>
> Er muoz gelīchesame die leiter abewerfen
> So er an īr ūfgestigen ist (Vogelweide)


Reply all
Reply to author
Forward
0 new messages