[efloraofindia:33356] Mushroom from Shimla_RVS02

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R. Vijayasankar

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Apr 26, 2010, 6:13:29 PM4/26/10
to indiatreepix
Since it was not our 'focus', i could not note any information and also didn't place any scale to measure it!
 
Ff possible, pl id it. Thanks.

With regards

Vijayasankar Raman
National Center for Natural Products Research,
The University of Mississippi,
Oxford, MS-38677, USA.

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tanay bose

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Apr 27, 2010, 12:42:48 AM4/27/10
to R. Vijayasankar, indiatreepix

Lycogala epidendrum, commonly known as wolf's milk or toothpaste slime, is a cosmopolitan species of plasmoidal slime mould which is often mistaken for a fungus. The aethalia, or fruting bodies, occur either scattered or in groups on damp rotten wood, especially on large logs, from June to November. These aethalia are small, pink to brown cushion-like globs. They may excrete a pink paste if the outer wall is broken before maturity. When mature, the colour tends to become more brownish. When not fruiting, single celled individuals move about as very small, red amoeba-like organisms called plasmodia, masses of protoplasm that engulf bacteria, fungal and plant spores, protozoa, and particles of non-living organic matter through phagocytosis .

During the plasmodial stage, individuals are reddish in colour, but these are almost never seen. When conditions change, the individuals aggregate by means of chemical signaling to form an aethalium, or fruiting body. These appear as small cushion-like blobs measuring about 0.3 cm to 1.5 cm in diameter. Colour is quite variable, ranging from pinkish-gray to yellowish-brown or greenish-black, with mature individuals tending towards the darker end. They may be either round or somewhat compressed with a warted or rough texture. While immature they are filled with a pink, paste-like fluid. With maturity the fluid becomes a powdery mass of minute gray spores. The spores measure 6 to 7.5 µm and are round in shape with a netted texture and appearing ochre to lavender in colour. The pseudocapillitia, sterile elements in the spore mass, are long, flattened, branching tubes with transverse wrinkles and folds.

Regards
Tanay

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R. Vijayasankar

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Apr 27, 2010, 12:51:03 AM4/27/10
to tanay bose, indiatreepix
Thanks Tanay, for the id as well as the interesting information!

With regards

Vijayasankar Raman
National Center for Natural Products Research,
The University of Mississippi,
Oxford, MS-38677, USA.


Inderjeet Sethi

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Apr 27, 2010, 12:58:27 AM4/27/10
to tanay bose, R. Vijayasankar, indiatreepix
Tanay ji,
I think it is Scleroderma sp. Size looks quite large with scales on surface. Lycogala does not show these scales. I have collected it.
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Department of Botany
SGTB Khalsa College
University of Delhi
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M: 9818775237

Yazdy Palia

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Apr 27, 2010, 1:02:44 AM4/27/10
to R. Vijayasankar, indiatreepix
Dear Mr. Vijayasankar Raman,
This looks like a puffball mushroom to me. Please go through the following link.
http://www.practicallyedible.com/edible.nsf/pages/puffballmushrooms
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puffball
Regards
Yazdy Palia.

On Tue, Apr 27, 2010 at 3:43 AM, R. Vijayasankar
<vijay.b...@gmail.com> wrote:

R. Vijayasankar

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Apr 27, 2010, 1:33:52 AM4/27/10
to Yazdy Palia, indiatreepix
You are right Yazdy ji, it belongs to puffball group. Left to experts to identify the species. Thank you very much.

With regards

Vijayasankar Raman
National Center for Natural Products Research,
The University of Mississippi,
Oxford, MS-38677, USA.


tanay bose

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Apr 27, 2010, 2:04:41 AM4/27/10
to R. Vijayasankar, Yazdy Palia, indiatreepix
Dear Inderjeet Ji,
All the photos come out in the google search for Lycogala epidendrum and Scleroderma sp shows this kind of scale on the suface of the both. Is there any other external morphological distinction between them??. kindly Validate. 
Regards
tanay 

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J.M. Garg

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May 21, 2010, 8:05:28 AM5/21/10
to efloraofindia, Vijayasankar Raman, tanay bose, Inderjeet Sethi, Yazdy Palia, kiran ranadive

Forwarding again for Id confirmation or otherwise please.

Some earlier relevant feedback:

Lycogala epidendrum, commonly known as wolf's milk or toothpaste slime, is a cosmopolitan species of plasmoidal slime mould which is often mistaken for a fungus. The aethalia, or fruting bodies, occur either scattered or in groups on damp rotten wood, especially on large logs, from June to November. These aethalia are small, pink to brown cushion-like globs. They may excrete a pink paste if the outer wall is broken before maturity. When mature, the colour tends to become more brownish. When not fruiting, single celled individuals move about as very small, red amoeba-like organisms called plasmodia, masses of protoplasm that engulf bacteria, fungal and plant spores, protozoa, and particles of non-living organic matter through phagocytosis .


During the plasmodial stage, individuals are reddish in colour, but these are almost never seen. When conditions change, the individuals aggregate by means of chemical signaling to form an aethalium, or fruiting body. These appear as small cushion-like blobs measuring about 0.3 cm to 1.5 cm in diameter. Colour is quite variable, ranging from pinkish-gray to yellowish-brown or greenish-black, with mature individuals tending towards the darker end. They may be either round or somewhat compressed with a warted or rough texture. While immature they are filled with a pink, paste-like fluid. With maturity the fluid becomes a powdery mass of minute gray spores. The spores measure 6 to 7.5 µm and are round in shape with a netted texture and appearing ochre to lavender in colour. The pseudocapillitia, sterile elements in the spore mass, are long, flattened, branching tubes with transverse wrinkles and folds.
Regards

Tanay”

 

“Tanay ji,

I think it is Scleroderma sp. Size looks quite large with scales on surface. Lycogala does not show these scales. I have collected it.
Dr.Inderjeet Kaur Sethi
Associate Professor”

 

“Dear Inderjeet Ji,


All the photos come out in the google search for Lycogala epidendrum and Scleroderma sp shows this kind of scale on the suface of the both. Is there any other external morphological distinction between them??. kindly Validate.
Regards

tanay ”

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