identification no200211sn2

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Satish Nikam

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Feb 20, 2011, 10:01:06 AM2/20/11
to Indiantrees Pics
Dear All,
             id.please.take at my farm in Mulshi,Pune inFeb.
plant habit:may be climber
height:about 4 ft.
leaves:--
inflorescence:--
other info:pink in colour
thanks 
regards
satish nikam

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Gurcharan Singh

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Mar 20, 2011, 6:22:11 AM3/20/11
to efloraofindia, Satish Nikam, Ron_Convolvulaceae, Balkar Arya, Nidhan Singh
Resurfacing again for ID


-- 
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/ 
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Dinesh Valke

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Mar 23, 2011, 4:46:17 AM3/23/11
to Gurcharan Singh, efloraofindia, Satish Nikam, Ron_Convolvulaceae, Balkar Arya, Nidhan Singh
... most probably the littlebell morning glory, Ipomoea triloba ... native of tropical America.
Regards.
Dinesh

Smilax004

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Mar 23, 2011, 7:42:43 AM3/23/11
to efloraofindia
This is probably Argyria sp.

Regards,
Giby



On Mar 20, 3:22 pm, Gurcharan Singh <singh...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Resurfacing again for ID
>
> --
> Dr. Gurcharan Singh
> Retired  Associate Professor
> SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
> Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
> Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Satish Nikam <satish_ni...@yahoo.com>
> Date: Sun, Feb 20, 2011 at 8:31 PM
> Subject: [efloraofindia:63209] identification no200211sn2
> To: Indiantrees Pics <indian...@googlegroups.com>
>
> Dear All,
>              id.please.take at my farm in Mulshi,Pune inFeb.
> plant habit:may be climber
> height:about 4 ft.
> leaves:--
> inflorescence:--
> other info:pink in colour
> thanks
> regards
> satish nikam
>
>
>
>  IMG_4186-r.JPG
> 56KViewDownload
>
>  IMG_4190-r.JPG
> 49KViewDownload
>
>  IMG_4215-r.JPG
> 47KViewDownload

Ron_Convolvulaceae

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Mar 23, 2011, 11:15:32 PM3/23/11
to efloraofindia
Hello ,

The plant may be Ipomoea triloba or perhaps another closely related
species in the Batatas series Ipomoea trifida.

I personally do not think the plant is an Argyreia , although the wide
tube could lead someone to countenence and Argyreia , although the
sepals are much more consistent with an Ipomoea in series Batatas.

The plant in the photos above are displaying some partially malformed
tubes ( which in cultivated Ipomoea nil "asagao" are known as 'reverse
tubes') and these type of corolla tubes (whether present in cultivated
or wild strains) to various degrees collapse (prolapse ?) backwards /
downwards upon themselves resulting in the outer edge of the limb to
be closer to the top of the stamens and pistil than would ordinarilly
be the case, additionally the base of the corolla can appear to be
wider then normal when viewed from the outside of the corolla.

The partially collapsed tube can best be viewed in the upper right of
the photo here
http://indiantreepix.googlegroups.com/attach/59bd350dc07f1612/IMG_4215-r.JPG?view=1&part=6&hl=en

My impression is that despite the prescence of some partially
collapsed tubes, the plant is likely to be as Dinesh ji has suggested
and that is likely Ipomoea triloba , although the tube as viewed from
the inside of the corolla does appear to be wider than is usual for
Ipomoea triloba and I would therefore consider a color variant of
Ipomoea trifida as a possibility.

I hope to see more closeup views of sepals as these structures are Key
to differential identification in many Ipomoea and other
Convolvulaceae...

Hope my impressions may be of value.

regards,

Ron

J.M. Garg

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Jul 2, 2011, 4:05:41 AM7/2/11
to efloraofindia, Satish Nikam, Dinesh Valke, Smilax004, Ron_Convolvulaceae, le...@rediffmail.com, drsmp...@gmail.com, tcha...@gmail.com, ajinky...@gmail.com, agasti...@yahoo.co.in, aparna...@gmail.com, raani...@gmail.com, neha.v...@gmail.com, rahu...@gmail.com, Plumbago...@gmail.com, mohina...@gmail.com

Forwarding again for Id confirmation or otherwise please.

Some earlier relevant feedback:

“... most probably the littlebell morning glory, Ipomoea triloba ... native of tropical America.
Regards.
Dinesh”

 

“This is probably Argyria sp.

Regards,
Giby”

 

The plant may be Ipomoea triloba or perhaps another closely related species in the Batatas series Ipomoea trifida.

I personally do not think the plant is an Argyreia , although the wide tube could lead someone to countenence and Argyreia , although the sepals are much more consistent with an Ipomoea in series Batatas. The plant in the photos above are displaying some partially malformed tubes ( which in cultivated Ipomoea nil "asagao" are known as 'reverse tubes') and these type of corolla tubes (whether present in cultivated or wild strains) to various degrees collapse (prolapse ?) backwards / downwards upon themselves resulting in the outer edge of the limb to be closer to the top of the stamens and pistil than would ordinarilly be the case, additionally the base of the corolla can appear to be wider then normal when viewed from the outside of the corolla.

The partially collapsed tube can best be viewed in the upper right of the photo here
http://indiantreepix.googlegroups.com/attach/59bd350dc07f1612/IMG_4215-r.JPG?view=1&part=6&hl=en

My impression is that despite the prescence of some partially collapsed tubes, the plant is likely to be as Dinesh ji has suggested
and that is likely Ipomoea triloba , although the tube as viewed from the inside of the corolla does appear to be wider than is usual for
Ipomoea triloba and I would therefore consider a color variant of Ipomoea trifida as a possibility.

I hope to see more closeup views of sepals as these structures are Keyto differential identification in many Ipomoea and other Convolvulaceae...

Hope my impressions may be of value.

regards,

Ron”



---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Satish Nikam <satish...@yahoo.com>
Date: 20 February 2011 20:31
Subject: [efloraofindia:63209] identification no200211sn2
To: Indiantrees Pics <indian...@googlegroups.com>





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sheetal chaudhari

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Jul 2, 2011, 10:00:42 AM7/2/11
to J.M. Garg, efloraofindia, Satish Nikam, Dinesh Valke, Smilax004, Ron_Convolvulaceae, le...@rediffmail.com, drsmp...@gmail.com, tcha...@gmail.com, ajinky...@gmail.com, agasti...@yahoo.co.in, aparna...@gmail.com, raani...@gmail.com, neha.v...@gmail.com, rahu...@gmail.com, Plumbago...@gmail.com, mohina...@gmail.com
Doesnt look like Ipomoea triloba, the funnel shape is very much like Argyreia sp


Regards,
Sheetal Pachpande

Gurcharan Singh

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Sep 8, 2011, 10:08:24 AM9/8/11
to efloraofindia, Dinesh Valke, Giby Kuriakose, Ron_Convolvulaceae, Satish Nikam

Forwarding again for Id confirmation or otherwise please.

Some earlier relevant feedback:

“... most probably the littlebell morning glory, Ipomoea triloba ... native of tropical America.
Regards.
Dinesh”

 

“This is probably Argyria sp.

Regards,
Giby”

 

The plant may be Ipomoea triloba or perhaps another closely related species in the Batatas series Ipomoea trifida.

I personally do not think the plant is an Argyreia , although the wide tube could lead someone to countenence and Argyreia , although the sepals are much more consistent with an Ipomoea in series Batatas. The plant in the photos above are displaying some partially malformed tubes ( which in cultivated Ipomoea nil "asagao" are known as 'reverse tubes') and these type of corolla tubes (whether present in cultivated or wild strains) to various degrees collapse (prolapse ?) backwards / downwards upon themselves resulting in the outer edge of the limb to be closer to the top of the stamens and pistil than would ordinarilly be the case, additionally the base of the corolla can appear to be wider then normal when viewed from the outside of the corolla.

The partially collapsed tube can best be viewed in the upper right of the photo here
http://indiantreepix.googlegroups.com/attach/59bd350dc07f1612/IMG_4215-r.JPG?view=1&part=6&hl=en

My impression is that despite the prescence of some partially collapsed tubes, the plant is likely to be as Dinesh ji has suggested
and that is likely Ipomoea triloba , although the tube as viewed from the inside of the corolla does appear to be wider than is usual for
Ipomoea triloba and I would therefore consider a color variant of Ipomoea trifida as a possibility.

I hope to see more closeup views of sepals as these structures are Keyto differential identification in many Ipomoea and other Convolvulaceae...

Hope my impressions may be of value.

regards,

Ron”



"Doesnt look like Ipomoea triloba, the funnel shape is very much like Argyreia sp
Regards,
Sheetal Pachpande"


-- 
Dr. Gurcharan Singh
Retired  Associate Professor
SGTB Khalsa College, University of Delhi, Delhi-110007
Res: 932 Anand Kunj, Vikas Puri, New Delhi-110018.
Phone: 011-25518297  Mob: 9810359089
http://people.du.ac.in/~singhg45/ 


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Satish Nikam <satish...@yahoo.com>
Date: Sun, Feb 20, 2011 at 8:31 PM
Subject: [efloraofindia:63209] identification no200211sn2
To: Indiantrees Pics <indian...@googlegroups.com>


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