ID of flowering tree.

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PARTHA PRATIM SAHA

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May 2, 2008, 1:04:32 PM5/2/08
to indian...@googlegroups.com, jmg...@gmail.com
Hi All,

Thanks for the prompt response for the previous mail. Again, I am
posting two pix for ID.

Regards,

Partha

PH 242.jpg
P1020724.jpg

J.M. Garg

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May 3, 2008, 12:15:34 AM5/3/08
to PARTHA PRATIM SAHA, indian...@googlegroups.com
Hi, Partha ji,
Pl. follow posting guidelines for separate mails for separate plants, giving place & date etc. of picture, Numbering of Id requests etc. You can see the Posting guidelines under file section at home page at http://groups.google.co.in/group/indiantreepix

 
--
With regards,
J.M.Garg
"We often ignore the beauty around us"
For learning about our trees & plants, please visit/ join Google e-group (Indiantreepix) http://groups.google.co.in/group/indiantreepix?hl=en
For my Birds, Butterflies, Trees, Landscape pictures etc., visit  http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Special:Contributions/J.M.Garg

Tabish

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May 3, 2008, 1:37:55 AM5/3/08
to indiantreepix
The pink one is Persian Cornflower (Centaurea dealbata)
http://www.paghat.com/centaurea.html
The second one is Sturt's Desert Pea (Swainsona formosa)
http://www.flowersofindia.net/catalog/slides/Sturt's%20Desert%20Pea.html
Cheers!
- Tabish

On May 2, 10:04 pm, "PARTHA PRATIM SAHA" <parthapratim...@gmail.com>
wrote:
> PH 242.jpg
> 123KViewDownload
>
> P1020724.jpg
> 110KViewDownload

J.M. Garg

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May 3, 2008, 2:36:14 AM5/3/08
to Tabish, indiantreepix
Here are some extracts from Wikipedia link:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sturt's_Desert_Pea

Sturt's Desert Pea is an Australian plant in the genus Swainsona, named after English botanist Isaac Swainson, famous for its distinctive blood-red leaf-like flowers, each with a bulbous black centre, or "boss". It is one of Australia's best known wildflowers.

Sturt's Desert Pea is a member of Fabaceae, subfamily Faboideae, however its flowers are so different from its relations that it is almost unrecognisable as a member of the pea family [4]. The flowers are around 9 centimetres in length and grow in clusters of around half a dozen on thick vertical stalks, which spring up every 10-15 centimetres along the prostrate stems, which may be 1 to 1.5 metres in length. The plant blooms from spring to summer, particularly after rain. There is a natural pure white form, as well as hybridised varieties which can have flowers ranging from red to pink, as well as yellow, with or without the central boss [5]. Approximately 15 silky grey-green leaves rise from each prostrate branch; both branches and leaves are covered with soft hair-like filaments. The fruit is a legume, about 5 centimetres long, and yields several flat, kidney-shaped seeds at maturity.

Most forms of the plant are low-growing or prostrate, however in the Pilbara region of north-western Australia varieties growing as tall as 2 metres have been noted

Susmita Basu

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May 5, 2008, 2:15:18 AM5/5/08
to J.M. Garg, Tabish, indiantreepix
Regards
Susmita

 

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