The JABUTICABA tree

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Sushmita Jha

unread,
01-Mar-2011, 12:59:44 am01/03/11
to indiantreepix
Hello all,
sharing a forward I have received. I have not done any research to verify this. Strange forwards do come our way. It will be great to know from experts whether this is real.
Thank you.
Sushmita Jha


 
                   Jabuticaba ?
         The Tree that Fruits on its Trunk

 
No, this is not a belated April Fool?s prank. They look as if they may have been pinned there by an overenthusiastic gardener to impress the neighbors, but the fruit of the Jabuticaba really does grow off the trunk of the tree.
 Otherwise known as the Brazilian Grape Tree, this plant is native to South America, notably  Paraguay ,  Argentina  and (obviously from its name) mostly from  Brazil . The fruit, a succulent looking purple color, can be plucked and eaten straight from the tree.

 It is also a popular ingredient in jellies and is also juiced to make a refreshing summer drink.  What is more, it can be fermented and made into wine and strong liquor.  After three days off the tree the fermentation will begin, so sometimes, there is no choice; honestly.
 
If you want one of these in your garden, then you have to be patient.  The tree takes an age to grow, but once it reaches maturity it is worth it.  However, it has proven to be very adaptable and, although it prefers moist and slightly acid soils, it will even grow well in an alkaline type soil.


 
The flowers themselves appear on the tree at most twice a year ? naturally.  They look like some strange alien creature that has deposited itself on the trunk and branches. The habit of flowers doing this makes them cauliflorous. Instead of growing new shoots, these plants flower direct from the woody trunk or stem.

 
You might ask why it is this way.  The simple answer is that it has evolved in this manner so that animals that cannot climb very high can reach it, eat it and then expel the seeds away from the parent tree to further propagate the species.

 
If the tree is well irrigated then it will flower and fruit all the year round.  The fruit itself is about four centimeters in diameter and has up to four large seeds.  As well as being used as food, the skins can be dried out and used to treat asthma and diarrhea.

If your tonsils are swollen you can also use it to try and alleviate the inflammation.  It is also hoped that the tree will be useful in the fight against cancer, as several anti-cancer compounds have been found in the fruit.

Altogether a useful tree, if a slightly strange looking one
__,_._,_



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Sushmita Jha

unread,
01-Mar-2011, 1:21:01 am01/03/11
to Bhatt Sweta, indiantreepix
Thank you so much, Sweta. Really appreciate your prompt help.
Sushmita

On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 11:43 AM, Bhatt Sweta <bhatt...@gmail.com> wrote:
Well i GOOGLED it and the information seems to be true.

Its known as Myrciaria cauliflora (Mart.) O.Berg

Belongs to the Myrtaceae family.

The name is derived from the Tupi word Jabuti (tortoise) + Caba (place), meaning the place where you find tortoises.

The fruit tree (named jabuticabeira in Portuguese) has salmon-colored leaves when they are young, turning green posteriorly.

It is a very slow growing tree which prefers moist, lightly acidic soils for best growth.

It is widely adaptable, however, and grows satisfactorily even on alkaline beach-sand type soils, so long as they are tended and irrigated.

Its flowers are white and grow directly from its trunk in a cauliflorous habit.

Naturally, the tree may flower and fruit only once or twice a year, but when continuously irrigated it flowers frequently, and fresh fruit can be available year round in tropical regions.

It’s a small tree native to Minas Gerais in southeastern Brazil, grown for its purple grape-like fruits it produces.

It has a thick, purple, astringent skin that covers a sweet, white, or rosy pink gelatinous flesh. Common in Brazilian markets

Jaboticabas are largely eaten fresh; their popularity has been likened to that of grapes in the US.


-----

USES

Traditionally, an astringent decoction of the sun-dried skins has been used as a treatment for hemoptysis, asthma, diarrhea, and gargled for chronic inflammation of the tonsils. The fruit is 3-4 cm in diameter with one to four large seeds, borne directly on the main trunks and branches of the plant, lending a distinctive appearance to the fruiting tree.

Fresh fruit may begin to ferment 3 to 4 days after harvest, so they are often used to make jams, tarts, strong wines, and liqueurs.

Several potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory anti-cancer compounds have been isolated from the fruit. One that is unique to the fruit is jaboticabin.


OTHERS
Also known as Eugenia cauliflora.

jabuticaba - for the fruit (jaboticabeira for the tree) actually embrace 4 species of very similar trees and fruits.

More details are available at http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/jaboticaba.html

Regards,
Shweta
--
Bhatt Shweta
Asso. Prof.,
TCSC,
Doctoral Research Student,
M.S.U.


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Anand Kumar Bhatt

unread,
01-Mar-2011, 7:27:46 am01/03/11
to Sushmita Jha, Bhatt Sweta, indiantreepix
Very informative. Thank you.
Gullar and Kathal also fruit in the same way.
ak
--
Anand Kumar Bhatt
A-59, B.S.F.Colony, Airport Road
Gwalior. 474 005.
Tele: 0751-247 2233. Mobile 0 94253 09780.
My blogsite is at:
http://anandkbhatt.blogspot.com
(A NEW BLOG HAS BEEN ADDED ON 29 jJanuary 2011.)
And the photo site:
www.flickr.com/photos/akbhatt/
(NEW PHOTOS HAVE BEEN ADDED ON 24 FEB 2011.)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Ten most  common surnames of Indians: Singh, Kumar, Sharma, Patel, Shah, Lal, Gupta, Bhat, Rao, Reddy. Cheers!

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hari lal

unread,
01-Mar-2011, 9:04:10 am01/03/11
to Anand Kumar Bhatt, Sushmita Jha, Bhatt Sweta, indiantreepix
very interesting Sushmita jee i think this belong to the family
moraceae same as ficus infectoria or ficus glomerata
hari shankar lal


On 3/1/11, Anand Kumar Bhatt <anand...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Very informative. Thank you.
> Gullar and Kathal also fruit in the same way.
> ak
>
> On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 11:51 AM, Sushmita Jha <sushmi...@gmail.com>wrote:
>
>> Thank you so much, Sweta. Really appreciate your prompt help.
>> Sushmita
>>
>> On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 11:43 AM, Bhatt Sweta <bhatt...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>

>>> Well i *GOOGLED* it and the information seems to be true.
>>>
>>> Its known as* Myrciaria cauliflora* (Mart.) O.Berg


>>>
>>> Belongs to the Myrtaceae family.
>>>

>>> The name is derived from the Tupi word *Jabuti* (tortoise) +
>>> *Caba*(place), meaning the place where you find tortoises.
>>>
>>> The fruit tree (*named jabuticabeira in Portuguese*) has salmon-colored


>>> leaves when they are young, turning green posteriorly.
>>>
>>> It is a very slow growing tree which prefers moist, lightly acidic soils
>>> for best growth.
>>>
>>> It is widely adaptable, however, and grows satisfactorily even on
>>> alkaline
>>> beach-sand type soils, so long as they are tended and irrigated.
>>>
>>> Its flowers are white and grow directly from its trunk in a cauliflorous
>>> habit.
>>>
>>> Naturally, the tree may flower and fruit only once or twice a year, but
>>> when continuously irrigated it flowers frequently, and fresh fruit can be
>>> available year round in tropical regions.
>>>
>>> It’s a small tree native to Minas Gerais in southeastern Brazil, grown
>>> for
>>> its purple grape-like fruits it produces.
>>>
>>> It has a thick, purple, astringent skin that covers a sweet, white, or
>>> rosy pink gelatinous flesh. Common in Brazilian markets
>>>
>>> Jaboticabas are largely eaten fresh; their popularity has been likened to
>>> that of grapes in the US.
>>>
>>>
>>> -----
>>>

>>> *USES*


>>>
>>> Traditionally, an astringent decoction of the sun-dried skins has been
>>> used as a treatment for hemoptysis, asthma, diarrhea, and gargled for
>>> chronic inflammation of the tonsils. The fruit is 3-4 cm in diameter with
>>> one to four large seeds, borne directly on the main trunks and branches
>>> of
>>> the plant, lending a distinctive appearance to the fruiting tree.
>>>
>>> Fresh fruit may begin to ferment 3 to 4 days after harvest, so they are
>>> often used to make jams, tarts, strong wines, and liqueurs.
>>>
>>> Several potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory anti-cancer compounds
>>> have been isolated from the fruit. One that is unique to the fruit is
>>> jaboticabin.
>>>

>>> *OTHERS*
>>> Also known as *Eugenia cauliflora*.


>>>
>>> jabuticaba - for the fruit (jaboticabeira for the tree) actually

>>> embrace*4 species of very similar trees and fruits.
>>> *
>>>
>>> More details are available at *
>>> http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/jaboticaba.html*


>>>
>>> Regards,
>>> Shweta
>>>
>>>
>>> On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 11:29 AM, Sushmita Jha
>>> <sushmi...@gmail.com>wrote:
>>>
>>>> Hello all,
>>>> sharing a forward I have received. I have not done any research to
>>>> verify
>>>> this. Strange forwards do come our way. It will be great to know from
>>>> experts whether this is real.
>>>> Thank you.
>>>> Sushmita Jha
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Jabuticaba ?
>>>> The Tree that Fruits on its Trunk
>>>>
>>>>

>>>> No, this is not a belated April Fool?s prank. They look as if they may
>>>> have been pinned there by an overenthusiastic gardener to impress the
>>>> neighbors, but the fruit of the Jabuticaba really does grow off the
>>>> trunk of
>>>> the tree.

>>>> Otherwise known as the Brazilian Grape Tree, this plant is native to
>>>> South America, notably Paraguay , Argentina and (obviously from its
>>>> name)
>>>> mostly from Brazil . The fruit, a succulent looking purple color, can
>>>> be
>>>> plucked and eaten straight from the tree.
>>>>

>>>> It is also a popular ingredient in jellies and is also juiced to make
>>>> a refreshing summer drink. What is more, it can be fermented and made
>>>> into
>>>> wine and strong liquor. After three days off the tree the fermentation
>>>> will
>>>> begin, so sometimes, there is no choice; honestly.
>>>>

>>>> If you want one of these in your garden, then you have to be patient.
>>>> The tree takes an age to grow, but once it reaches maturity it is worth
>>>> it.
>>>> However, it has proven to be very adaptable and, although it prefers
>>>> moist
>>>> and slightly acid soils, it will even grow well in an alkaline type
>>>> soil.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>

>>>> The flowers themselves appear on the tree at most twice a year ? *
>>>> naturally*. They look like some strange alien creature that has


>>>> deposited itself on the trunk and branches. The habit of flowers doing
>>>> this
>>>> makes them cauliflorous. Instead of growing new shoots, these plants
>>>> flower
>>>> direct from the woody trunk or stem.
>>>>
>>>>

>>>> You might ask why it is this way. The simple answer is that it has
>>>> evolved in this manner so that animals that cannot climb very high can
>>>> reach
>>>> it, eat it and then expel the seeds away from the parent tree to further
>>>> propagate the species.
>>>>
>>>>

>>>> If the tree is well irrigated then it will flower and fruit all the
>>>> year round. The fruit itself is about four centimeters in diameter and
>>>> has
>>>> up to four large seeds. As well as being used as food, the skins can be
>>>> dried out and used to treat asthma and diarrhea.
>>>>

>>>> If your tonsils are swollen you can also use it to try and alleviate
>>>> the inflammation. It is also hoped that the tree will be useful in the
>>>> fight against cancer, as several anti-cancer compounds have been found
>>>> in
>>>> the fruit.
>>>>
>>>> Altogether a useful tree, if a slightly strange looking one
>>>> __,_._,_
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --

>>> *Bhatt Shweta*
>>> *Asso. Prof.,*
>>> TCSC,
>>> *Doctoral Research Student,*


>>> M.S.U.
>>>
>>>
>>
>
>
> --
> Anand Kumar Bhatt
> A-59, B.S.F.Colony, Airport Road
> Gwalior. 474 005.
> Tele: 0751-247 2233. Mobile 0 94253 09780.
> My blogsite is at:
> http://anandkbhatt.blogspot.com
> (A NEW BLOG HAS BEEN ADDED ON 29 jJanuary 2011.)
> And the photo site:
> www.flickr.com/photos/akbhatt/

> <http://www.flickr.com/photos/akbhatt/>(NEW PHOTOS HAVE BEEN ADDED ON 24 FEB

Dr Pankaj Kumar

unread,
01-Mar-2011, 9:31:46 am01/03/11
to efloraofindia
Dear Sushmita Mam,
Thanks a lot for sharing the pics and information. A nice piece of
research it seems.
Myrciaria cauliflora as the name suggests cauliflora means "flowering
on the stem".

Regards
Pankaj


On Mar 1, 7:04 pm, hari lal <taxo....@gmail.com> wrote:
> very interesting Sushmita jee i think this belong to the family
> moraceae same as ficus infectoria or ficus glomerata
> hari shankar lal
>
> On 3/1/11, Anand Kumar Bhatt <anandkbh...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> > Very informative. Thank you.
> > Gullar and Kathal also fruit in the same way.
> > ak
>
> > On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 11:51 AM, Sushmita Jha <sushmitas...@gmail.com>wrote:
>
> >> Thank you so much, Sweta. Really appreciate your prompt help.
> >> Sushmita
>
> >>> <sushmitas...@gmail.com>wrote:

Neo

unread,
02-Mar-2011, 12:06:49 am02/03/11
to efloraofindia
Appears to belong to the Flacourtia genus. May be Flacourtia jangomas

On Feb 28, 9:59 pm, Sushmita Jha <sushmitas...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Hello all,
> sharing a forward I have received. I have not done any research to verify
> this. Strange forwards do come our way. It will be great to know from
> experts whether this is real.
> Thank you.
> Sushmita Jha
>
>                        Jabuticaba ?
>          The Tree that Fruits on its Trunk
>
>  No, this is not a belated April Fool?s prank. They look as if they may have
> been pinned there by an overenthusiastic gardener to impress the neighbors,
> but the fruit of the Jabuticaba really does grow off the trunk of the tree.
>   Otherwise known as the Brazilian Grape Tree, this plant is native to South
> America, notably  Paraguay ,  Argentina  and (obviously from its name)
> mostly from  Brazil . The fruit, a succulent looking purple color, can be
> plucked and eaten straight from the tree.
>
>  It is also a popular ingredient in jellies and is also juiced to make a
> refreshing summer drink.  What is more, it can be fermented and made into
> wine and strong liquor.  After three days off the tree the fermentation will
> begin, so sometimes, there is no choice; honestly.
>
>  If you want one of these in your garden, then you have to be patient.  The
> tree takes an age to grow, but once it reaches maturity it is worth it.
> However, it has proven to be very adaptable and, although it prefers moist
> and slightly acid soils, it will even grow well in an alkaline type soil.
>
>  The flowers themselves appear on the tree at most twice a year ? *naturally
> *.  They look like some strange alien creature that has deposited itself on
> the trunk and branches. The habit of flowers doing this makes them
> cauliflorous. Instead of growing new shoots, these plants flower direct from
> the woody trunk or stem.
>
>  You might ask why it is this way.  The simple answer is that it has evolved
> in this manner so that animals that cannot climb very high can reach it, eat
> it and then expel the seeds away from the parent tree to further propagate
> the species.
>
>  If the tree is well irrigated then it will flower and fruit all the year
> round.  The fruit itself is about four centimeters in diameter and has up to
> four large seeds.  As well as being used as food, the skins can be dried out
> and used to treat asthma and diarrhea.
>
>  If your tonsils are swollen you can also use it to try and alleviate the
> inflammation.  It is also hoped that the tree will be useful in the fight
> against cancer, as several anti-cancer compounds have been found in the
> fruit.
>
> Altogether a useful tree, if a slightly strange looking one
> __,_._,_
>
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manudev madhavan

unread,
02-Mar-2011, 7:18:17 am02/03/11
to Neo, efloraofindia
Very informative..
Thanks a lot

--
Manudev K Madhavan
Junior Research Fellow
Systematic & Floristic Lab,
Department of Botany, 
Centre for Postgraduate Studies & Research 
St. Joseph's College, Devagiri
Kozhikode- 673 008
Mob: 9496470738

J.M. Garg

unread,
16-Jun-2011, 1:34:00 am16/06/11
to efloraofindia, Sushmita Jha, Bhatt Sweta, taxo...@gmail.com, Dr. Pankaj Kumar, nvict...@rediffmail.com, manudev madhavan, tapu...@gmail.com, Shrikant Ingalhalikar, Vijayasankar Raman

Forwarding again for Id confirmation or otherwise please.

Some earlier relevant feedback:

“Well i GOOGLEDit and the information seems to be true.

Its known as Myrciaria cauliflora (Mart.) O.Berg ” from Shweta ji.
 

“very interesting Sushmita jee i think this belong to the family
moraceae
same as ficus infectoria or ficus glomerata
hari shankar lal”
 
"Thanks a lot for sharing the pics and information. A nice piece of
research it seems.
Myrciaria cauliflora as the name suggests cauliflora means "flowering
on the stem".
Regards
Pankaj"

 

“Appears to belong to the Flacourtia genus. May be Flacourtia jangomas” from Neo ji.

--
'Creating awareness of Indian Flora & Fauna'
The whole world uses my Image Resource of more than a thousand species & eight thousand images of Birds, Butterflies, Plants etc. (arranged alphabetically & place-wise): http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:J.M.Garg. You can also use them for free as per Creative Commons license attached with each image.
For identification, learning, discussion & documentation of Indian Flora, please visit/ join our Efloraofindia Google e-group: http://groups.google.co.in/group/indiantreepix (more than 1600 members & 70,000 messages on 30/5/11) or Efloraofindia website: https://sites.google.com/site/efloraofindia/ (with a species database of around 5000 species)

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Ushadi micromini

unread,
17-Jun-2011, 6:12:23 am17/06/11
to efloraofindia, J. M. Garg, Gurcharan Singh
GARG JI:
YES THIS IS JABOTICABA... a cauliflori tree from Brazil...
called * Myriciaria cauliflora*

I will send a new post with my pictures, from a botanical garden
started by a physician in California...
I was not there when the tree flowered but have seen , photographed
and tasted fruits of this tree elsewhere,
somewhat sweet..

Usha di
=====




On Jun 16, 10:34 am, "J.M. Garg" <jmga...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Forwarding again for Id confirmation or otherwise please.
>
> Some earlier relevant feedback:
>
> “Well i GOOGLEDit and the information seems to be true.
> Its known as *Myrciaria cauliflora (Mart.) O.Berg* ” from Shweta ji.
>
> “very interesting Sushmita jee *i think this belong to the family
> moraceae* same as ficus infectoria or ficus glomerata
> hari shankar lal”
>
>  "Thanks a lot for sharing the pics and information. A nice piece of
> research it seems.
> *Myrciaria cauliflora* as the name suggests cauliflora means "flowering
> on the stem".
> Regards
> Pankaj"
>
> “Appears to belong to the Flacourtia genus. *May be Flacourtia jangomas*”
> from Neo ji.
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Sushmita Jha <sushmitas...@gmail.com>
> Date: 1 March 2011 11:29
> Subject: [efloraofindia:63856] The JABUTICABA tree
> To: indiantreepix <indian...@googlegroups.com>
>
> Hello all,
> sharing a forward I have received. I have not done any research to verify
> this. Strange forwards do come our way. It will be great to know from
> experts whether this is real.
> Thank you.
> Sushmita Jha
>
>                        Jabuticaba ?
>          The Tree that Fruits on its Trunk
>
>  No, this is not a belated April Fool?s prank. They look as if they may have
> been pinned there by an overenthusiastic gardener to impress the neighbors,
> but the fruit of the Jabuticaba really does grow off the trunk of the tree.
>   Otherwise known as the Brazilian Grape Tree, this plant is native to South
> America, notably  Paraguay ,  Argentina  and (obviously from its name)
> mostly from  Brazil . The fruit, a succulent looking purple color, can be
> plucked and eaten straight from the tree.
>
>  It is also a popular ingredient in jellies and is also juiced to make a
> refreshing summer drink.  What is more, it can be fermented and made into
> wine and strong liquor.  After three days off the tree the fermentation will
> begin, so sometimes, there is no choice; honestly.
>
>  If you want one of these in your garden, then you have to be patient.  The
> tree takes an age to grow, but once it reaches maturity it is worth it.
> However, it has proven to be very adaptable and, although it prefers moist
> and slightly acid soils, it will even grow well in an alkaline type soil.
>
>  The flowers themselves appear on the tree at most twice a year ? *naturally
> *.  They look like some strange alien creature that has deposited itself on
> the trunk and branches. The habit of flowers doing this makes them
> cauliflorous. Instead of growing new shoots, these plants flower direct from
> the woody trunk or stem.
>
>  You might ask why it is this way.  The simple answer is that it has evolved
> in this manner so that animals that cannot climb very high can reach it, eat
> it and then expel the seeds away from the parent tree to further propagate
> the species.
>
>  If the tree is well irrigated then it will flower and fruit all the year
> round.  The fruit itself is about four centimeters in diameter and has up to
> four large seeds.  As well as being used as food, the skins can be dried out
> and used to treat asthma and diarrhea.
>
>  If your tonsils are swollen you can also use it to try and alleviate the
> inflammation.  It is also hoped that the tree will be useful in the fight
> against cancer, as several anti-cancer compounds have been found in the
> fruit.
>
> Altogether a useful tree, if a slightly strange looking one
> __,_._,_
>
> --
> With regards,
> J.M.Garg (jmga...@gmail.com)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Jmgarg1
> 'Creating awareness of Indian Flora & Fauna'
> The whole world uses my Image Resource of more than a *thousand species* &
> eight thousand images of Birds, Butterflies, Plants etc. (arranged
> alphabetically & place-wise):http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:J.M.Garg. You can also use them
> for free as per Creative Commons license attached with each image.
> For identification, learning, discussion & documentation of Indian Flora,
> please visit/ join our Efloraofindia Google e-group:http://groups.google.co.in/group/indiantreepix(more than 1600 members &
> 70,000 messages on 30/5/11) or Efloraofindia website:https://sites.google.com/site/efloraofindia/(with a species database of
> around 5000 species)
>
>
>
>  ATT00010.jpeg
> 147KViewDownload
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>  ATT00005.jpeg
> 120KViewDownload
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>  ATT00006.jpeg
> 66KViewDownload
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>  ATT00004.jpeg
> 230KViewDownload
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> 222KViewDownload
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> 135KViewDownload
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>  ATT00009.jpeg
> 91KViewDownload
>
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> 87KViewDownload
>
>  ATT00001.jpeg
> 116KViewDownload

Ushadi micromini

unread,
17-Jun-2011, 6:27:23 am17/06/11
to efloraofindia, J. M. Garg, Gurcharan Singh
Dear All:
come to think of it....

MANY trees set flowers and fruits on its trunk directly....
some that come to mind right here are:

Cocoa or Theobroma cacao
Jackfruit or kathal or Artocarpus heterophyllus
Calabash or Crescentia cujete
Cannonball tree or Couroupita guianensis
Devphal or Artocarpus gomezianus Wall. ex Trécul

and this... Jaboticaba... or Myrciara cauliflora....


Usha di
=============

On Jun 16, 10:34 am, "J.M. Garg" <jmga...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Forwarding again for Id confirmation or otherwise please.
>
> Some earlier relevant feedback:
>
> “Well i GOOGLEDit and the information seems to be true.
> Its known as *Myrciaria cauliflora (Mart.) O.Berg* ” from Shweta ji.
>
> “very interesting Sushmita jee *i think this belong to the family
> moraceae* same as ficus infectoria or ficus glomerata
> hari shankar lal”
>
>  "Thanks a lot for sharing the pics and information. A nice piece of
> research it seems.
> *Myrciaria cauliflora* as the name suggests cauliflora means "flowering
> on the stem".
> Regards
> Pankaj"
>
> “Appears to belong to the Flacourtia genus. *May be Flacourtia jangomas*”
> from Neo ji.
>
> ---------- Forwarded message ----------
> From: Sushmita Jha <sushmitas...@gmail.com>
> Date: 1 March 2011 11:29
> Subject: [efloraofindia:63856] The JABUTICABA tree
> To: indiantreepix <indian...@googlegroups.com>
>
> Hello all,
> sharing a forward I have received. I have not done any research to verify
> this. Strange forwards do come our way. It will be great to know from
> experts whether this is real.
> Thank you.
> Sushmita Jha
>
>                        Jabuticaba ?
>          The Tree that Fruits on its Trunk
>
>  No, this is not a belated April Fool?s prank. They look as if they may have
> been pinned there by an overenthusiastic gardener to impress the neighbors,
> but the fruit of the Jabuticaba really does grow off the trunk of the tree.
>   Otherwise known as the Brazilian Grape Tree, this plant is native to South
> America, notably  Paraguay ,  Argentina  and (obviously from its name)
> mostly from  Brazil . The fruit, a succulent looking purple color, can be
> plucked and eaten straight from the tree.
>
>  It is also a popular ingredient in jellies and is also juiced to make a
> refreshing summer drink.  What is more, it can be fermented and made into
> wine and strong liquor.  After three days off the tree the fermentation will
> begin, so sometimes, there is no choice; honestly.
>
>  If you want one of these in your garden, then you have to be patient.  The
> tree takes an age to grow, but once it reaches maturity it is worth it.
> However, it has proven to be very adaptable and, although it prefers moist
> and slightly acid soils, it will even grow well in an alkaline type soil.
>
>  The flowers themselves appear on the tree at most twice a year ? *naturally
> *.  They look like some strange alien creature that has deposited itself on
> the trunk and branches. The habit of flowers doing this makes them
> cauliflorous. Instead of growing new shoots, these plants flower direct from
> the woody trunk or stem.
>
>  You might ask why it is this way.  The simple answer is that it has evolved
> in this manner so that animals that cannot climb very high can reach it, eat
> it and then expel the seeds away from the parent tree to further propagate
> the species.
>
>  If the tree is well irrigated then it will flower and fruit all the year
> round.  The fruit itself is about four centimeters in diameter and has up to
> four large seeds.  As well as being used as food, the skins can be dried out
> and used to treat asthma and diarrhea.
>
>  If your tonsils are swollen you can also use it to try and alleviate the
> inflammation.  It is also hoped that the tree will be useful in the fight
> against cancer, as several anti-cancer compounds have been found in the
> fruit.
>
> Altogether a useful tree, if a slightly strange looking one
> __,_._,_
>
> --
> With regards,
> J.M.Garg (jmga...@gmail.com)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/User:Jmgarg1
> 'Creating awareness of Indian Flora & Fauna'
> The whole world uses my Image Resource of more than a *thousand species* &
> eight thousand images of Birds, Butterflies, Plants etc. (arranged
> alphabetically & place-wise):http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:J.M.Garg. You can also use them
> for free as per Creative Commons license attached with each image.
> For identification, learning, discussion & documentation of Indian Flora,
> please visit/ join our Efloraofindia Google e-group:http://groups.google.co.in/group/indiantreepix(more than 1600 members &
> 70,000 messages on 30/5/11) or Efloraofindia website:https://sites.google.com/site/efloraofindia/(with a species database of
> around 5000 species)
>
>
>
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